Transwave by Andrew Loh

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Tom Frame
Posts: 1058
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
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Location: San Francisco

Transwave by Andrew Loh

Postby Tom Frame » September 4th, 2011, 2:22 pm

Transwave (Trick) by Andrew Loh $10.99
14 page PDF, 11 illustrations
Available at: www.freewebs.com/cardicians


Andrew Loh is a young magician from Malaysia. In this PDF, he teaches two versions of his latest routine.

The PDF is nicely designed and the illustrations are very well done.

The author provides references for some of the techniques.

With one exception, Mr. Loh employs well known sleights that require an intermediate level of skill.

English is not Mr. Lohs primary language and I commend him for attempting to write this material in his non-native tongue. Unfortunately, the result of this language barrier is text that does not provide a pleasurable reading experience. His writing gets in the way of the reading.

On the Magic Caf, the author has many supporters whose primary language is English. Prior to releasing this product, he should have sent copies to several of them for proofreading and editing. If ones goal is to produce and sell a high quality product, it is ones duty to enlist whatever assistance necessary to achieve that goal. There is no shame in asking for help.

In addition to the language problem, the authors instructions lack important detail.

Mr. Loh begins by applauding Phil Goldsteins BWave. He then states, However, in my version, this has nothing to do with BWave but I couldnt think of any better idea to give a suitable title for this effect.

I appreciate that glimpse into the authors creative process.


Version #1: The performer removes a red-back packet of cards from a card wallet. He turns it face-up and displays the four Aces in his left hand and the four Kings in his right hand. He tables the Ace packet face-down. He snaps the face-up King packet and the Kings turn face-down. Then the Kings transform into the Aces. He tables the Ace packet face-up.

The performer picks up the face-down packet, snaps it and the cards transform into face-up Kings. He attempts to cause the Kings to turn face-down again, but he fails. He spreads the face-up Kings and reveals that only the King of Diamonds has turned face-down.

He removes the face-down King of Diamonds, shakes it and it transforms into the Ace of Diamonds. He spreads the face-up Ace packet to reveal the face-down King of Diamonds among the Aces.

Finally, he flips the Kings face-down to reveal that their backs are now green, blue, cyan and black.

Beginning a magic effect by removing a packet of cards from a teeny, cheesy wallet causes laymen to correctly surmise that special cards are being used. That awareness lessens their impression of the performers skill and diminishes the effects potential impact because the special cards create the magic, not the performer.

To avoid this problem, Bro. John Hamman urged performers to remove special cards from a normal deck to implicitly convey that the special cards are normal. I wish that Mr. Loh had heeded that sage advice.

I dont like this routines odd construction. After successfully transforming four cards, the performer is apparently unable to repeat the feat and reverses only one card. That is an anticlimactic moment. And why is he now able to reverse only that particular card and why did it transpose with the same-suit Ace?

Other than stating that the Kings are magical (explicitly giving credit to the special cards) the authors presentation doesnt explain why their backs change color.

From a theatrical standpoint, why is any of this happening? The effects feel like disjointed pieces of eye candy rather than elements of a cohesive routine with a clear through-line.

A primary technique in this routine is Peter Duffies Snap Change. I wasnt familiar with this technique. After repeatedly reading and working through Mr. Lohs instructions, I still have no idea how to execute the technique. I dont like it.


Version #2: The performer removes a red-back packet of cards from a card wallet. He turns it face-up and displays the four Aces in his left hand and the four Kings in his right hand. He tables the Ace packet face-down. He waves the King packet over the Ace packet and the Kings transform into Aces.

The performer picks up the face-down packet and flexes it, causing the backs to change from red to blue. He turns the packet face-up and displays four Kings.

He attempts to cause the Kings to turn face-down again, but he fails. He spreads the face-up Kings and reveals that only the King of Diamonds has turned face-down.

He removes the King and turns it face-up, revealing that it has changed into the Ace of Diamonds.

The performer picks up the Ace packet and spreads it, revealing the King of Diamonds.

To explain how the effect was accomplished, the performer turns the King face-down, displaying Smoke and Mirrors written on its back.

Again, Mr. Loh provides no presentational rationale for these magical occurrences.

The author acknowledges that he appropriated the Smoke and Mirrors line from John Bannons Mega Wave booklet. How creative.


Not Recommended
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