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Take a look at your library

Posted: January 9th, 2003, 7:04 am
by Guest
Thanks to "Mr. Royston" on the thread about Close up card Magic, I have come to an interesting (I think) question for you.

Which book in your library contains the most tricks you actually perform? And what about videos/DVDs?

For me:
- "Close Up Card Magic" by Harry Lorayne
- "The Magic of David Regal No. 2"

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 9th, 2003, 8:38 pm
by Guest
I perform many tricks from Close Up Card Magic, the Lorayne Tapes(number 4 is the best in my eyes), and lots from Card College. I've added two from Aaron Fishers' book...which is a lot for a new book. I do alot from Lorayne books, My Favorite Card Tricks, Quatam leaps has a few, Dexterity has one I use all the time now(With a crimp and spelling...i usually don't either, but as he says....great trick). The Card Magic of Nick Trost has many great tricks....I re read it recently and forgot how many I had liked...and even performed a few that I forgot came from there.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 9th, 2003, 9:43 pm
by Brian Marks
FASDIU by Paul Cummins
David Roth's EXPERT COIN MAGIC by RK
SIMON SAYS by Simon Lovell

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 9th, 2003, 9:44 pm
by Brian Morton
Probably the biggest staples of my repetoire come from:

"Professional Card Magic," (Cliff Green)

Howard Schwarzman's 1961 lecture notes (can't remember the title offhard -- I'm having a heading-toward-senior-moment...)

and, funnily enough

Card College 3.

brian :cool:

(This ain't everything, just some of my favorite tricks come from these)

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 10th, 2003, 5:27 pm
by troublewit
Brother John Hamman's "Twins" from the Kaufman book. It is my daughter's favorite trick....and she's seen alot. Every time I perform this trick for audiences, it ALWAYS entertains (from the story), and completely AMAZES....thanks to Bro. John's diabolical thinking.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 11th, 2003, 6:16 pm
by Guest
I've read hundreds and hundreds of magic books over the past forty years, but the number of items in my core, performance-ready repertoire seems to always stay around 25 to 30 items. It's seldom I find one item in a book to use, and rarely do I find multiple items.

The Secrets of Brother Hamman contains five items that seem to always stay in my repertoire. The Signed Card, Two-Shuffles Harry, The Twins, The Pinochle Trick, and The Marx Brothers. (Does anyone else do The Marx Brothers? Wonderful trick.) There are at least another ten tricks that have rotated in out of my repertoire over the years. I feel about this book the way many people have been writing about CUCM on this Forum lately. If I had to limit my performances to material from only one book, this would be the one. Great magic using both normal cards and gaffs, and running the gamut from "suitable for motivated beginners" through intermediate-level sleight-of-hand, and even a couple of TOUGH items.

Variations by Earl Nelson deserves its near-legendary status. I now have just three items from this book in my repertoire (Pass the Sandwich, Sleeve Aces, and Reset, Reset), but this is some seriously good magic here. My favorite trick of all time to perform is Reset, Reset. Someone posted on this Forum recently that a revised edition will be published shortly. About time. (By the way, if you've been practicing some variant of the Classic Pass for some time, but have yet to use it in front of the laity, Pass The Sandwich is a wonderful trick with which to begin doing so. The effect is not seriously diminished by less-than-perfect execution of the Pass. Also, this is a perfect walk-around item.)

There have only been a few times that I have picked up an item from a video/DVD that wasn't already in print. For those of you who want to look for it, the Larry Jennings Card Stab on one of his Paris Sessions videotapes is a great trick, which I don't believe has appeared elsewhere. (Maybe I should keep my mouth shut about it.) Mr. Jennings said on the tape that Allen Okawa used it frequently and said that it was responsible for getting him more work than any other trick. I believe it. (Perhaps this item will be included in Mr. Jennings Takes It Easy ?)

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 11th, 2003, 7:20 pm
by Bob Coyne
Variations by Earl Nelson deserves its near-legendary status. I now have just three items from this book in my repertoire (Pass the Sandwich, Sleeve Aces, and Reset, Reset), but this is some seriously good magic here. My favorite trick of all time to perform is Reset, Reset.
I LOVE Reset, Reset too. I learned it from the Variations video, not the book. Great tape in my opinion.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 11th, 2003, 8:40 pm
by Ryan Matney
Larry Jennings card stab from the video is something I have used a LOT. It has a classic look to it with the wrapped deck. Something people don't see often now I think. I have a little pocket knife I found that works perfect for it.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 11th, 2003, 9:15 pm
by Guest
Ryan,

As often as not, I will do the trick without using the napkin for cover, as it is not absolutely necessary for the trick, and a paper napkin or other suitable cover is not always available. (I agree, though, that the napkin does lend a certain "air" to the trick, and makes it stand apart from other card tricks.)

Scott

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 12th, 2003, 6:03 am
by Guest
I purchased The Brother Hamman book minutes before attending Bro. John's video taping for Papa Stevens here in Wichita back in 1990.
As Bro. John went through his routines I was putting check marks beside the names of the effects in the index.
Once home I first started learning The Marx Brothers and have performed it thousand's of times since. A good friend of mine who has seen quite a few card tricks told me The Marx Brothers is his favorite trick.
If you have the book (shame if you don't) and don't perform the Marx Brothers, I would encourage anyone to look it up (page 234) and work it up. Killer routine.

Take care all

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 12th, 2003, 9:03 am
by Guest
I've always found the effect described under "A Gambler's Aid" in Buckley's Card Control (p.166) of particular interest, although i've yet to pluck up enough courage to perform it in public. The effect runs as follows:

You ask a spectator to name a number between six and twelve. Say he opts for nine. You count five cards from the top and then, realising that the volunteer chose nine you drop the five cards back on top and ask the spectator himself to count to the ninth card, remove it, remember it and place it on the bottom (or anywhere else into the deck for that matter). You can have your back turned if you like whilst all this takes place. Then without touching the deck you proceed to name the card at the chosen number. There is no prior set-up of the deck.

Anyone performed this to an audience?

HappyTrickster

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 12th, 2003, 9:34 am
by Guest
If I can get one killer trick from a book I am happy. If I can get two, well, then I'm twice as happy.
There are 7 incredibly strong tricks in John Bannon's "Smoke and Mirrors" that are still in my repretoire after first learning them in 1998. My favorite is "Tattoo You" where a spectator's signature is visibly moved from the face of one card to the face of another.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 12th, 2003, 10:48 am
by Ryan Matney
As often as not, I will do the trick without using the napkin for cover, as it is not absolutely necessary for the trick, and a paper napkin or other suitable cover is not always available. (I agree, though, that the napkin does lend a certain "air" to the trick, and makes it stand apart from other card tricks.)
Hi Scott,

Yes, I've done it without the napkin as well. I started getting a package of black napkins (In the birthday supplies)and carrying a couple with me just for that trick though. You probably know sometimes you get asked to repeat this particular trick. This is one that I do repeat if asked. I wrap the deck again and use Frank Garcia's stab method from phoenix and also his video. It's a total bluff but works really great since you have already proved it once.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 12th, 2003, 11:52 am
by Glen Guldbeck
Great thread GetJet!!

I regularly perform six effects from Earl Nelson's "Variations".
1. Reset, Reset
2. Between You Points of Departure
3. Pass The Sandwich
4. Sleeve Aces
5. Clifton's Ring Move
6. Earl's Ring Move

So much great material! The other effect that I've seen performed, but have not learned, is "The Changing of the Card". Very visual!!

Very excited about the re-releases of "Variations" and "Versatile Card Magic".

Glen

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 12th, 2003, 6:10 pm
by Jeff Haas
Don,

What are the seven tricks you consider to be the standouts in "Smoke and Mirrors?"

I like Heart of the City a lot.

Jeff

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 12th, 2003, 8:46 pm
by Guest
Jeff,

Tattoo You
Hop Two It
Heart of the City
Detour De Force
Underhanded
Trick Shot Production
Timely Departure

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 13th, 2003, 12:29 pm
by Guest
Thanks to all who have contributed, I will definitely look up the Marx Brothers Trick ;-)

By the way, I also love Bannon's book. I had incredible reactions from "Timely Departure". I performed it after Regal's "Bottoms Up Aces" (which I love, too) and all were saying "Yes, the one with the aces was nice, but how the heck could he find out my favorite hour and our three cards!"

I have been working on Tattoo You, but I am a bit self-conscious about the last move (i.e. the "visual" transfer"). Does it really go by well, and do you have any tips on the transposition in the end?

Thanks again and keep our ART alive!

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 14th, 2003, 1:48 am
by Jeff Haas
Don, thanks! I'll have to take another look at Timely Departure. I've never done a clock trick; they never appealed to me as a genre.

Jeff

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 14th, 2003, 6:37 am
by Matthew Field
Originally posted by GetJet:
I am a bit self-conscious about the last move (i.e. the "visual" transfer"). Does it really go by well, and do you have any tips on the transposition in the end?
I'm a big fan of "Tattoo You" and perform it all the time. The visual transfer at the end goes over well for me -- just give it a feint or two (as John suggests) before you pull the signature off.

Matt Field

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 14th, 2003, 6:43 am
by Guest
Just following the chain of associations here but . . . on the Sankey SECRET FILES DVDs (which I bought on Matt Fields' recommendation--thanks, Matt), there's an application of this same kind of "transfer" from one card to another--only it's the transfer of a tear (rip) from one card to another. Typical wonderful Sankey insanity.

--Ezra.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 14th, 2003, 7:22 am
by Jim Maloney_dup1
The book that I do the most stuff from is Theatrical Close-up, by Peter Samelson (I do NY Transpo and I'm working on the coin vanish and some of the sponge ball stuff).

-Jim

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 14th, 2003, 9:15 am
by Chris Bailey
Hmmm...one good trick per book and I'd be happy too. Stiring Silver and @#X! from 100% Sankey (Plus Back In Time and a hot-shot cut/top change trick from his video)

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 14th, 2003, 1:17 pm
by Sam Kesler
Glen, could you share any information about the re-issue of Variations and Versatile Card Magic? I sent you an e-mail but it was undeliverable. Thanks!

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 25th, 2003, 9:50 am
by Glen Guldbeck
Sam,

Sorry it took me so long to reply. Earl Nelson and Mike Caveney are re-publishing "Variations" and Simon's book "Versatile Card Magic". Earl is also releasing a DVD of "moves" from the Simon book. According to Earl, both books are identical in terms of layout, size, and overall appearance. Both will be released together. Earl, undoubtedly, will be including variations of his variations. Can hardly wait. Supposed to be out in February or March.

Sam, my e-mail is gguldbeck@nacchq.com.

Glen

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: January 26th, 2003, 6:22 am
by Guest
I really like "A Matter of Psychology" from Ultra Cervon...plot is straight-forward, and the kicker ending really shocks many folks for whom I do it.

I second everyone's comments about "Twins;" what a glorious, glorious plot; the story, not the moves is what makes it a classic, and enables me to draw the spectators in. (Saw the Marx Bros. routine on his tape...I'll revisit it, based on comments here. I was a big Marx Bros. fan, so I certainly should be able to adapt patter. ("I never forget a face, but in your case, I'll make an exception.")

Lewis Jones has "Tomb of the Kings" in his "Lusions" manuscript, and while I'm working through it (still), it really intrigues me with the multiple phases woven together with the plot.

Food for thought.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: February 22nd, 2003, 12:20 pm
by Guest
mine has to be Cards on the Table by Jerry Sadowitz. It is utter genius

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: February 22nd, 2003, 1:25 pm
by Joe M. Turner
Originally posted by Steve Friedberg:
I really like "A Matter of Psychology" from Ultra Cervon...plot is straight-forward, and the kicker ending really shocks many folks for whom I do it.
I learned "A Matter of Psychology" but later switched to Larry Jennings' "Ambitious Classic." I don't have a good reason for it, though. I love both routines.

Let's see... John Bannon's SMOKE & MIRRORS book & video contain some items I perform a lot. Paul Cummins' FASDIU #1 has a lot, too.

I've been inspired to get my copy of Variations back out. There really is a lot of good stuff in there that I have let sit...

JMT

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: February 22nd, 2003, 2:00 pm
by Pete Biro
With over 1,500 books in the next room... I thought about the question posted here and suddenly realized ALMOST everything I do has been taught to me by someone one-on-one.

Folks like Senor Mardo, Slydini, Vernon, Diaconis, Bill Anderson (totally unknown guy, but started me out with great lessons), Johnny Thompson, Charlie Miller, Mike Caldwell, Topper Martyn, Jay Marshall, Pat Page, Fred Kaps, Al Koran, Glenn Heywood and, last but not least, Ken Brooke. :cool:

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: February 22nd, 2003, 7:51 pm
by Guest
I like performing Warp II from "Ultra Cervon" It's a great version of the Walton classic.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 5th, 2003, 4:27 pm
by Guest
A very good post.

My stand-up act contains five items from The Royal Road to Card Magic. The material from the last chapter is quite astonishing.

The Conus Aces

Eveyrwhere and Nowhere

The Ladies Looking Glass

Cards up the Sleeve

and Everybody's Card

That is a complete act.

The old effects are timeless classics.

Regards

Michael

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 5th, 2003, 9:24 pm
by NCMarsh
Sources of my repetoire:

Kenner/Liwag Magic Man Examiner

Swiss Another Interesting Application of That Principle (a goldmine!)

Hollingworth Drawing Room Deceptions

Regal Close Up and Personal

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 5th, 2003, 9:25 pm
by NCMarsh
I should add that the Malone DVD's have a lot that I hope to add...

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 6th, 2003, 8:21 am
by Ira Rush
For me, if I had to choose the one or two books that I have gotten the most mileage out of, they would be;

Derek Dingle - "Dingle's Deceptions"

Paul Gertner - "Steel and Silver"

And the winner for the video category is...

Paul Harris - "Adventures in Close-Up- Volume3 "

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 8th, 2003, 3:49 pm
by Guest
"The Good Luck Card" from Royal Road is still one of my favourite effects.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 10th, 2003, 10:36 am
by James Nelson
Book - Marlo Without Tears

Video - Videomind

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 10th, 2003, 1:29 pm
by Guest
From the video library, I'll agree with the 3rd PH video that Tannen's put out.

The other videos with the most stuff I use from them include the first JC Wagner video and the first John Bannon video (A1s early videos had great stuff)

HR

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 10th, 2003, 6:37 pm
by troublewit
I already posted in this thread regarding a book. (Bro John Hamman) For video, I submit the Commercial Classics of Johnny Thompson 4 Volume set on L&L video. I don't like learning from video...I much prefer books. This was an exception. The Balls and Net routine, for example, has touches and handlings from Silent Mora, Dai Vernon, Will DeCieve, Ed Marlo, Oscar Pladic, John Scarne and , of course, Johnny Thompson himself. The Cups and Balls draws from Dai Vernon, Charlie Miller, Pops Krieger, Doc Daley, and Malini. Add to this, Johnny performs and explains (often with great anecdotes and insights) routines from Al Baker, Roy Benson, Leipzig, Hofsinzer, Elmer Biddle, Alex Elmsely, Al Koran, Manuel, Emil Jarrow, Tom Beardon, Slydini, T Nelson Downs, and Han Ping Chien. If you can't find usable material from these tapes, you should consider passing the wand. These tapes are on a very short list of videos I will not part with.

Re: Take a look at your library

Posted: March 22nd, 2003, 11:19 pm
by Scott Fridinger
David Regal's 3 DVD's/Videos are all excellent, I have tried almost every trick on them, and they all work very well. I feel they have very good bang for the bucks, and you have every level of type and level of trick at your disposal. The best thing is that he actually routines the trick during the performance portion, so you see how they could flow together, unlike some tapes which do trick, explanation, trick, explination.

Also, since many of the effects can also be found in his book Close Up and Personal and Constant Fooling I & II, I would have to put to put them on the list because of other added material.

Thank you Mr. Regal.

Scott