Magicians at War by H. Wayne Capps (2020) / A Slightly Biased Review

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Zig Zagger
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Magicians at War by H. Wayne Capps (2020) / A Slightly Biased Review

Postby Zig Zagger » June 21st, 2020, 4:51 am

"Great liars are also great magicians," Adolf Hitler supposedly once said or wrote. I have yet to find a German source for this alleged quote (any help?), but hey, it's all over the internet, so it must be true, right?! And it's printed in this book, like many other tales, semi-truths and lies. But if you turn the quote around, you will get an undisputed truth: Great magicians are also great liars. Just like, among others, many politicians or trumping spin doctors. So I wouldn't dream of buying juicy or heroic stories from any of them easily. You have to take them with a grain of salt, if not with a big handful of woofledust.

Yet magic lore is full of these stories, and we all love them, don't we? Because it sounds so exciting, so great and reassuring for our magic passion or profession: "How Espionage and Deceit Changed History" (subtitle of this book); "The Card Trick That Stopped WWII" (title of chapter 5); "Magicians in history have literally changed the world" (final chapter). Yeah, right! Sadly, the backstage view of magic is less glorious, less interesting and often shabby.

The author, H. Wayne Capps, is both a professional magician (under the name of Howard Blackwell) and a U.S. Air Force Reserve Lieutenant Colonel. With this slim booklet, which has grown out of a magic club mini lecture, he has tried to fuse his two occupations and passions. As the author states, this book was mainly written in the back of a C-17 cargo aircraft that took him around the world on military missions. That may explain why his offer is somewhat drafty and shaky. Why exactly?

Despite a fascinating and broad topic, the author has chosen the path of least resistence and has limited his work to mainly retelling the best, and already best-known, rehashed stories. Now, if you are a bit proficient in magic history, which names would you list with regard to magicians in and around the battlefields of war and espionage? Right, Robert-Houdin, Jasper Maskelyne, John Mulholland, Kalanag, maybe Houdini, "the spy" (?). And yes, all of them are covered in this book, plus a few other obvious ones (see http://www.magiciansatwar.com for the table of contents). Surprisingly, neither the Trojan Horse nor The Man Who Never Was nor The Death Camp Magicians are covered, not to mention Dudley Clarke, the real British master deceiver in World War II.

Capps is aware of the lore and its questionable lure, as he points out several times. At the same time, he exploits these myths carelessly, in order to tell and sell, and shows little interest in unlinking the rings of fiction and facts. I find this annoying, as uninitiated readers have no chance of making up their own mind because of the poor crediting. With a few notable exceptions, only the most basic sources are given.

The two main sources on Jasper Maskelyne, for example, are his own, largely fictitious "autobiography" and David Fisher's subsequent super-fiction novel, The War Magician. Richard Stokes, who has done so much research to investigate and debunk the Maskelyne myths, is not even mentioned. At times, the crediting is also sloppy. Robert-Houdin's seminal autobiography is not even listed as a primary source; and as I looked up a supposed author named Clarke Sternberg, "he" turned out be the U.K.-based Sternberg Clarke entertainment agency which once ran a blog post on Robert-Houdin on their website. Duh!

Yet the author emphasizes more than once that he has "thoroughly researched" the field, despite quoting sources like ABC News or writing sentences like this: "John Mulholland was a New York based magician and according to his widow, performed several times at Radio City Music Hall and wrote a number of books on magic." He also claims that Robert-Houdin had toured the United States. And we learn that his in-depth research of the obscure (?) artist Paul Potassy made the author discover two important sources, Potassy's biography & trick book by Uwe Schenk and Michael Sondermeyer and his 3-DVD set from L&L Publishing. Wow!

Sadly, and although announced in the introduction, there is no noticeable attempt of the reserve author to cast the actions and magic principles described into a bigger theoretical context on the role of deception in warfare or the parallels between the theaters of war and theater illusions. With a bit more care and effort, he could have dug into Sun Tzu or the eminent works of Barton Whaley and many other scholars.

Capps' original contributions are limited to interviews with two fellow magicians, one an Army veteran, the other a former CIA director. While the brief chapter on military veterans "who used magic as a healing tool to fight the war within" taps into uncharted territory that I feel would have deserved a much bigger expedition, the CIA chapter falls short of its promise of top secrets revealed. As we learn, the CIA magician was merely fond of showing tricks to foreign diplomats and helped train his team on hostile deception tactics "to benefit a nation." Abraca-poof!

Like almost any self-published book, this one could have used an editor and a spell checker to good results. Without, the "proverbial" cat becomes "preverbal", the "ruse" a "rouse", and Eugene Burger is misspelled as Berger. Ouch! If the chapters are in any meaningful order, I must have missed it. I also find it both amusing and irritating that the book's cover image of my Kindle edition is still speckled with the watermark logo from fiverr, a web platform for freelance services...

I realize this review is already much longer than some of the book's chapters, which is not a good thing. So to conclude, if you have never heard of any of the magicians mentioned above and are mildly interested in their claimed endeavors and achievements in the wars of the world, this slim book of 72 pages might serve as a quick and unambitious introduction. I would advise you, however, to consider getting the Kindle version via Amazon for about $5 and not bother with the paperback edition for a hefty $24,95.

But if you have some background in magic history and more than a passing interest in this topic, you likely won't find much of value here. For an in-depth, no-nonsense approach on the bigger context of military deception, let me recommend some major sources instead (out of about 30+ books on this subject in my library): Jon Latimer's Deception in War, Thaddeus Holt's The Deceivers, and any book by Barton Whaley, like Stratagem.

To end on a positive note, I fully agree with the author's final assessment: "All of these stories, no matter how far-fetched, are certainly fun to tell and will no doubt outlive us all." Amen to that, and cheers to all you great liars and master deceivers out there!

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Full disclosure: I consider myself rather well-read in this particular area of magic and military deception, and I have delivered a detailed lecture about "Magicians at War" (sic!) at the recent 8th European Magic History Conference in Vienna in 2019 (see https://emhc2019.com/). That's why I'm both a bit saddened and annoyed that this book underdelivers on a truly fascinating facet of our beloved art.

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A slightly shorter version of this review has appeared in Marco Pusterla's fine Ye Olde Magic Mag (see https://yeoldemagicmag.com/), Vol. 6, Issue 3.
Tricks, tips, news, interviews, musings and fun stuff: Have a look at our English-German magic blog! http://www.zzzauber.com
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Jack Shalom
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Re: Magicians at War by H. Wayne Capps (2020) / A Slightly Biased Review

Postby Jack Shalom » June 21st, 2020, 9:20 am

I love that he referenced L&L DVDs. Did he quote Scotty, David, or Cassandra?
ZZ, is there anywhere we can read your talk in English?

Diego
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Re: Magicians at War by H. Wayne Capps (2020) / A Slightly Biased Review

Postby Diego » June 21st, 2020, 12:28 pm

RE: "Stories, no matter how far-fetched, are fun to tell."

I was talking with a fellow historian about the reality vs. the telling of Robert Houdin quashing an uprising in Alegeria, and noted he was
doing the showman's M.O. of "cutting up jackpots", where the entertainment value of the story, is more valued than it's veracity.
Robert Houdin back home, "Oh you think scoring with _____ when playing England last year, was a big deal, I stopped a revolution in Algeria last year!"

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Zig Zagger
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Re: Magicians at War by H. Wayne Capps (2020) / A Slightly Biased Review

Postby Zig Zagger » June 22nd, 2020, 4:06 pm

Jack Shalom wrote:I love that he referenced L&L DVDs. Did he quote Scotty, David, or Cassandra?

:lol: Haha, I don't think so.
Jack Shalom wrote:ZZ, is there anywhere we can read your talk in English?

It's not on my blog yet, but if you PM me your e-mail address I'd be happy to send you a PDF file of my (English) presentation.
Tricks, tips, news, interviews, musings and fun stuff: Have a look at our English-German magic blog! http://www.zzzauber.com
Advancing the art in magic one post at a time (yeah, right!)


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