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Out of the Box by Bobby Hasbun

Posted: February 7th, 2012, 2:46 pm
by Tom Frame
Out of the Box (Ebook) by Bobby Hasbun $8.00
26 pages, 56 photographs
Available at: bobbyhasbun@yahoo.com


Here we have the first set of lecture notes from young card-slinger Bobby Hasbun. The author writes well and does a good job of teaching the material. He cites his recent inspirational sources, but he doesnt provide primary source attribution.

For some inexplicable reason, Mr. Hasbun chose to capitalize all of the text. While this imprudent decision wont hinder your ability to learn the material, it does make for rather unpleasant reading. Kind of like a ransom note.

The abundant photographs are clear and helpful.


Dunburied: A participant selects a card, say the King of Spades, which is lost in the deck. The performer removes the black Kings from the deck, stating that they will find the participants card. He waves the face-up Kings over the deck and a face-down card appears between them. He waves the cards over the deck again and the black Kings change into red Kings, with the selection sandwiched between them.

At the end of the effect you are left dirty and the author doesnt describe how he cleans up. However, the participants reaction to the revelation of the selected card will provide you with ample misdirection to do what you need to do. I like it.


Hold Em Switch Em: The performer hands a Seven and a Deuce to a participant, stating that they constitute the worst opening hand in Texas Hold Em. He tables a pair of Aces, remarking that they are the best opening hand in Hold Em.

He retrieves the Seven and Deuce from the participant and transforms them into the pair of Aces. The participant turns over the tabled pair of Aces and discovers that they have transformed into the Seven and Deuce.

This effect first appeared in the March 2011 issue of Magic. I liked it enough to include it in my book Hold Em Magic (2011). I still like it.


Sandwich at Any Number: Two cards are freely selected and lost in the deck. A participant freely names any number from one to fifty-two, say fourteen. The performer counts to the fourteenth and reveals the first selection.

The performer returns the counted cards to the deck and spreads the deck face-down. Two face-up Kings are seen sandwiching a face-down card at the fourteenth position. The performer turns it over, revealing the second selection.

This is the authors improved handling of his effect that first appeared in the January 2011 issue of Magic. I like this novel approach to the ACAAN plot.


Prophet: A participant shuffles the deck and names a number from one to twenty-five, say fifteen. She cuts the deck in half and freely chooses either half. The performer turns over the top card of the chosen half, say the Queen of Hearts. He turns it face-down, buries it in the other half of the deck and the participant shuffles it.

The performer removes two isolator cards in the other half of the deck. The participant places these cards face-up on the top of bottom of her half deck. She reassembles the deck.

The performer spreads the deck, displaying the face-up isolator cards. The participant attempts to find her card by freely selecting a card from between the isolator cards. Unfortunately she fails.

The performer spreads the deck face-down and the participant counts to the fifteenth card between the isolator cards. She turns it over and discovers the Queen of Hearts.

This is an oddly constructed effect. I dont understand why Mr. Hasbun included the segment in which the participant fails to find her card. It doesnt advance the plot and there is no payoff for the participant. The handling also feels procedurally overwrought. I dont like it


Memento: The performer displays the face-up black Kings on top of the face-down, blue-backed deck. The participant freely selects a card and signs its face. The performer loses her card in the deck.

The performer removes the Kings and spreads them, revealing that they have produced a red-backed Joker a wild card. Suddenly, the Jokers back changes to blue. Then, the Joker transforms into the participants signed selection. Finally, the selections back changes to red. The participant can keep her card.

This is a surprising, well constructed effect. I like it.


Spielberg Production: The author teaches his technique for the flash production of four Aces.

The literature offers numerous methods for causing the Aces to suddenly explode from the deck. Relative to them, this method is okay.


Rotary Cut: This is a method of legitimately cutting the deck in a fluid, visually appealing manner.

Do I really need another legitimate in-the-hands cut? Uh, no. However, I can see how Mr. Hasbuns handling may appeal to people who compulsively collect card-cutting curiosities.


Variations: Here, the author offers alternative versions of the preceding effects.


While the material in these lecture notes isnt life-altering, I like four of the effects and the price tag is hard to beat. I look forward to Mr. Hasbuns future offerings.


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