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DVDs or video files

Posted: September 16th, 2017, 2:30 pm
by Tom Gilbert
I'm going to try to clean up my hard drive and copy or convert the video files to DVDs. Would there be any advantage to converting the video files (mpg) to DVD files and then burn them?

Re: DVDs or video files

Posted: September 16th, 2017, 8:31 pm
by Bill Mullins
I think DVDs are becoming an obsolete medium. At least, the ones you burn on a computer aren't super stable. I'd buy a stand-alone hard drive and copy the files to it ( or get 2 so they are backed up.) Do this every few years as your library grows and storage gets cheaper.



My Blu Ray player will play many video files directly, so I wouldn't convert the files if I were to back them up on DVDs. You can get a Sony player that will do this for $60 or so, maybe less.

If you do decide to convert them, Handbrake is a great free video conversion program, and VLC is a great free video player.

Re: DVDs or video files

Posted: September 16th, 2017, 9:48 pm
by Tom Gilbert
Thanks Bill. I do have a back up, but wanted to watch them a little more conveniently, as I usually store the drive away. Makes sense to put a lot more video files on a DVD, than spending time converting and only getting 1, maybe 2 on a disk. I've heard of Handbrake and also Flick, but files it is.

Re: DVDs or video files

Posted: September 17th, 2017, 12:43 pm
by Bill Mullins
Tom Gilbert wrote:Thanks Bill. I do have a back up, but wanted to watch them a little more conveniently, as I usually store the drive away.

Well, with two you can hide one as a back up and use one attached to your machine. Or to your network, if you have one (we have a wifi network attached to the cable network to get internet to the various computers, tablets and phones in our house).

To follow up on the blu ray, we end up watching a lot of computer files on our big TV (mostly movies and British/PBS mystery shows). This is very similar to the player we have. It plays .AVI, .MP4, .MKV and other common video file formats. It also plays from a USB port, so it's very simple to copy a file from the computer to a thumb drive and play it on the machine.

We also have a Chromecast, and us it to play things in Chrome and stream them to the TV (the Chrome browser will play several types of video files).

I was not familiar with Flick. May have to give it a try.