Magic on the Moon

Discussions of new films, books, television shows, and media indirectly related to magic and magicians. For example, there may be a book on mnemonics or theatrical technique we should know or at least know about.
Jim Maloney
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Jim Maloney » July 22nd, 2009, 2:28 pm

000 wrote:A 1999 Gallop Poll found that 6% of the American public doubted the moon landings, which skepticism according to Fox Television increased to 20% after the showing of it's Feb 2001 special, viewed by some 15 million people.
In 2009 a poll conducted by the British Engineering and Technical Magazine found that 25% did not believe man has walked on the moon.
Now you'd have to agree thats a whole lot of morons.
So RK, reach for the mouthwash and act in a more respectful manner to those whose opinion you disagree with.


Well, by definition, nearly 50% of all people have below average intelligence...

-Jim
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Richard Kaufman
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Richard Kaufman » July 22nd, 2009, 2:34 pm

What he said, "That's a whole lot of morons."
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Gordolini
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Gordolini » July 22nd, 2009, 2:55 pm

Time to come back to earth...

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El Mystico
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby El Mystico » July 22nd, 2009, 3:00 pm

i watched the Mythbusters films and thought they did a great job.

000 - did you watch them? Did you find them unconvincing? if so, in what ways? Or were there specific other bits of evidence suggesting the landing was a fake that you feel have not been addressed?

Tom Frame
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Tom Frame » July 22nd, 2009, 3:38 pm

When it comes to conspiracy theorists, I don't think that we're talking about mere stupidity or denial.

A delusion is a false personal belief that is not subject to reason or contradictory evidence. A delusion may be firmly maintained in the face of incontrovertible evidence that it is false.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV-TR, precise data about the population prevalence of this disorder is lacking, but the best estimate is .03%.
"There is more to consciousness than meets the mind's eye." - Frame

Ray Eden
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Ray Eden » July 22nd, 2009, 4:28 pm

I just want to be f**king clear... is it the accepted f**king norm within this f**king forum to use the f**king "F" word as a common place f**king adjective.

I tend to keep this type of low English from my postings, but if its acceptable I plan to use it a lot f**king more! It's f**king fun!!! And as George Carlin was wont to point out... its such a useful f**king word! It's a noun, a verb, an adjective. It may even qualify as a dangling participle!!

And before anyone gets on a pedestal... I am being sardonic!!! As a writer myself, I find the usage of such low English extremely counterproductive when trying to make effective arguments.

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mrgoat
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby mrgoat » July 22nd, 2009, 5:55 pm

Ray Eden wrote:I just want to be f**king clear... is it the accepted f**king norm within this f**king forum to use the f**king "F" word as a common place f**king adjective.

I tend to keep this type of low English from my postings, but if its acceptable I plan to use it a lot f**king more! It's f**king fun!!! And as George Carlin was wont to point out... its such a useful f**king word! It's a noun, a verb, an adjective. It may even qualify as a dangling participle!!

And before anyone gets on a pedestal... I am being sardonic!!! As a writer myself, I find the usage of such low English extremely counterproductive when trying to make effective arguments.


Oh, f**k off.

Ray Eden
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Ray Eden » July 22nd, 2009, 5:57 pm

LOL... I figured someone would take this far too seriously. mrgoat takes the bait.

David Alexander
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby David Alexander » July 22nd, 2009, 6:20 pm

Tom Frame wrote:When it comes to conspiracy theorists, I don't think that we're talking about mere stupidity or denial.

A delusion is a false personal belief that is not subject to reason or contradictory evidence. A delusion may be firmly maintained in the face of incontrovertible evidence that it is false.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV-TR, precise data about the population prevalence of this disorder is lacking, but the best estimate is .03%.


Well, .03% of the US is still roughly 100,000 people. Toss in some paranoia and the figure will jump up considerably...add a dash of foolishness and an inability to understand what evidence is and the inability to think critically and the number zooms upward to a population that can support the people who put forward this nonsense. Think Art Bell and his career

Richard Stokes
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Richard Stokes » July 22nd, 2009, 7:40 pm

I think it's useful to engage in radical skepticism - and contest the status quo or the received wisdom or the dominant orthodoxy.
Conspiracy theories , at the very least, force us to re-evaluate the evidence.
And, we frequently find that the evidence is not as solid as we first imagined.

Sometimes the conspiracies actually exist- eg Watergate or the recent poker software scandal where , despite repeated assurances, insiders were directly reading players' hole cards.
Characters like Martha Mitchell (remember her? the Attorney General's wife back in the Nixon days! ) might easily have been consigned to the paranoid and delusional category. The persistent 'anoraks' who cracked the software scandal were initially dismissed as embittered lunatic losers.

000
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby 000 » July 22nd, 2009, 10:28 pm

50% of Americans believe in miracles........any labels gents?

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Richard Kaufman
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Richard Kaufman » July 22nd, 2009, 11:20 pm

Anyone who's religious has to believe in both miracles and the supernatural. That's called faith.

I don't see any relation between "faith" and denying the fact that men have landed on the moon!

Try to keep your [censored] straight and don't be a smartass.
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Dustin Stinett
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Dustin Stinett » July 22nd, 2009, 11:21 pm

Richard Stokes wrote:I think it's useful to engage in radical skepticism

Im all for skepticism and questioning authority. But conspiracy theories are usually made up of circular arguments and unsubstantiated evidence that flies in the face of not only corroborated evidence, but also logic and common sense.

The Watergate and poker scandals had none of that. (And even after all the evidence came out against the Nixon Administration, Martha Mitchell was still considered a bit of a nut ball. Nixons assertion that there would not have been a scandal had it not been for her is absurd. The scandal had already been exposed by the time she started talking with the press.)

000 wrote:50% of Americans believe in miracles........any labels gents?

Equating faith in a deity (for which there is no empirical evidence either for or against) with this subject is grasping at straws at best.

Dustin

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Gord
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Gord » July 23rd, 2009, 12:20 am

000 wrote:50% of Americans believe in miracles........any labels gents?


Toronto Maple Leaf fans????

Gord

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Dustin Stinett
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Dustin Stinett » July 23rd, 2009, 2:58 am

Don't forget us LA Kings fans.

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mrgoat
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby mrgoat » July 23rd, 2009, 3:46 am

Ray Eden wrote:LOL... I figured someone would take this far too seriously. mrgoat takes the bait.


I figured someone wouldn't realise I was joking.

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Richard Kaufman
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Re: Magic on the Moon

Postby Richard Kaufman » July 23rd, 2009, 10:28 am

And now I think we're done.
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