Dai Vernon - Revelations

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Nathan
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Joined: October 14th, 2008, 8:23 pm

Dai Vernon - Revelations

Postby Nathan » February 5th, 2003, 12:47 am

Does anyone have a copy of Vernon's Revelations (the annotations to Erdnase) that they want to sell?

I've been trying to locate the book for a while but all the copies I've found are ridiculously priced because they are signed by the Professor himself.

Last week an unsigned copy of this book went on eBay for over $100. Is this a fair price for this book considering its current rarity?

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Pete Biro
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Re: Dai Vernon - Revelations

Postby Pete Biro » February 5th, 2003, 7:56 am

Read Erdnase, Revelations added little. :cool:
Stay tooned.

Gary
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Re: Dai Vernon - Revelations

Postby Gary » February 5th, 2003, 6:01 pm

Nathan,

Revelations starts out with a fascinating 10 page introduction by Persi Diaconis. Vernon then provides finess on outjog and injog shuffles. Vernon's simple statements such as "The positions described by Erdnase cannot be improved upon." tells the student that the method given is as good as it gets and so learn it exactly the was Erdnase described it. How many people do you know who have studied one book in detail for over 75 years?

Vernon explains how to "correctly" perform a slip cut and a cut that will retain the complete stock. Vernon explains a very important point that Erdnase failed to mentinon in his explanation.

Then there is Vernon's "touch" for retaining the top stock during a false cut procedure. He mentions "Since evolving the above handling many years ago, we have used it consistently to the exclusion of all others."

Vernon also tells you about the "most important paragraphs in Erdnase's entire work" and goes on to say that how it is "often disregarded by the average reader."

Vernon gives his own tips on the crimp, locations using the jog, another great use for the Erdnase bottom deal GRIP, his own variation of the Erdnase second deal, great tips on palming including proper replacement of cards which have been bottom palmed, his tip on maintaining a bottom palm while dealing, where to find the finest descriptions for the two-handed pass with very detailed explanation of his own pass, his own routine for Three Card Monte, his technique for the diagonal palm shift.

This doesn't include the section on Present Day Developments which include work on great tips on the pull out shuffle, the push through shuffle, block transfer and applications, cull of the mysterious kid, etc, etc.

I like it at any price...

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Richard Kaufman
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Re: Dai Vernon - Revelations

Postby Richard Kaufman » February 5th, 2003, 8:54 pm

Opinions on "Revelations" have been polarized since it was published. Some people shrug and wonder what the big deal was about, since they had heard about this legendary book of Vernon's for decades. Others treasured the Professor's brief comments.
I can tell you that there was a lot more to the manuscript before it was ... edited.
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Nathan
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Joined: October 14th, 2008, 8:23 pm

Re: Dai Vernon - Revelations

Postby Nathan » February 5th, 2003, 10:05 pm

From reading old discussion about this book and also talking to quite a few magicians about it, I have already gathered that many people give it only a mediocre review. That is why I was surprised to see it go for so much on eBay.

I've had the good fortune to borrow this book from a friend for a short time and I think it is very useful. It contains a different type of commentary than Annotated Erdnase and hidden amongst some of the bits of text are some great tips. Since many people apparently disagree with me I figured it shouldn't be that difficult to find someone who wants to part with the book.


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