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Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 23rd, 2016, 2:00 pm
by Leonard Hevia
Richard Kaufman wrote:"EIM"?


Encyclopedia of Impromptu Magic

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 23rd, 2016, 2:36 pm
by observer
Leonard Hevia wrote:
Richard Kaufman wrote:"EIM"?


Encyclopedia of Impromptu Magic


Yup. Hey it's a long title to type out!

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 23rd, 2016, 2:43 pm
by Q. Kumber
I've just gone over the EIM instructions and, yes, I could follow them. I'm not sure how easy it would be to follow if I didn't already know how to do it. The get into it is different from Vernon's handling, but may have some of Daley's ideas.

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 24th, 2016, 10:22 am
by Bill Mullins
The instructions in EIM are pretty much the same as those he wrote in Hugard's Magic Monthly, in 1950.

I was going to contact Harvey Rosenthal who mentioned (years ago) earlier in the thread that he had a video of himself doing the knot and would send it to requesters, in hopes that the offer was still available. On another forum, I found mention last winter that Mr. Rosenthal is in a nursing home and is not well.

Does anyone know any further details about him? Is his status any better?

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 24th, 2016, 11:57 am
by observer
Yes, EIM is a compilation of Gardner's long-running Hugard's series. Gardner didn't mean he was rewriting that 1950 version - the 1950 version is a rewrite of the version in Here's New Magic (1937), which he ghostwrote for Joe Berg.

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 24th, 2016, 12:48 pm
by Richard Kaufman
The Gardner description is impossible to follow if you don't already know how to do it.

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 24th, 2016, 3:23 pm
by Bill Mullins
observer wrote:Yes, EIM is a compilation of Gardner's long-running Hugard's series.

In general, yes, but in this case, no. The HMM write-up of Berg's Knot is in HMM Feb 1950. Gardner didn't start the "Encyclopedia of Impromptu Tricks" series until Mar 1951. The eventual book, Encyclopedia of Impromptu Magic, published in 1978, compiled the HMM Impromptu Tricks series (3/1951 [Apples - Arm] - 4/1958 [Watch - Zipper]) plus other tricks he had written up in HMM and elsewhere, plus other impromptu tricks he had compiled over the years for eventual inclusion in the book he knew he would do. Berg's Knot does appear in the "Encyclopedia" series in HMM (8/1953, p. 27), but only by reference -- he says to look it up in the Feb 1950 issue.

Descriptions of the knot are as follows:

Text:
Joe Berg, Here's New Magic (1937) [ghosted by Gardner] p. 16
Martin Gardner, HMM 2/1950 p. 630
Karl Fulves, Pallbearer's Review Close Up Folio #7 (19770 p 993
Martin Gardner, Encyclopedia of Impromptu Magic (1978) [reprint of HMM 2/1950]
David Avadon, Joe Berg and Eric Lewis, The Berg Book (1983) [I haven't seen this so I don't know if it is the 1937 description reprinted, or a new write up]
Mark Trimble, The Encyclopedia of Silk Magic vol 4 (1993) p. 1697
David Ben, Zarrow: A Lifetime of Magic (2008) p. 292
Bruce Cervon, Castle Notebooks vol 3 (2008) p. 245 [note: the Table of Contents in the book is incorrect]

Video:
Dai Vernon, Revelations vol 9
Dai Vernon, L&L World's Greatest Magic Secrets of Silk Magic vol 1 [suspect this is the Revelations footage]
Dai Vernon, Genii The Lost Dai Vernon Lecture (2012) (33:10)

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 24th, 2016, 3:39 pm
by Bill Mullins
Add:

Dai Vernon, L&L Revelations 30th Anniversary Magic Castle April 15 1977 Lecture (1981)

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 24th, 2016, 4:49 pm
by observer
Bill Mullins wrote:
observer wrote:Yes, EIM is a compilation of Gardner's long-running Hugard's series.

In general, yes, but in this case, no. The HMM write-up of Berg's Knot is in HMM Feb 1950. Gardner didn't start the "Encyclopedia of Impromptu Tricks" series until Mar 1951.



That is perhaps something of technicality. The essential purpose of my post was to note that EIM reprints the earlier Hugard's description, which is a revision of the original 1937 Here's New Magic description; that is to say, the EIM version is not (as far as I can tell) an update of the Hugard's version. But this is getting a bit circular, and I had better stop before dizziness sets in.

It might be worth adding the 2015 EIM to the list above. I wonder if it has any additional information on the Berg knot?

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: October 24th, 2016, 6:42 pm
by erdnasephile
Bill Mullins wrote:David Avadon, Joe Berg and Eric Lewis, The Berg Book (1983) [I haven't seen this so I don't know if it is the 1937 description reprinted, or a new write up]


This reference can be found on pages 249-254 of The Berg Book (1983). It actually consists of 2 separate descriptions.

The first, written by Eric Lewis, is based off Martin Gardner's second description in HMM; however, he tries to "clarify further certain points, particularly in the initial stages." Mr. Lewis states that he has made a "subtle difference in the handling." Amusingly, Mr. Lewis also spends time talking about what you all have been saying about how difficult the knot is to learn and that "no one I have met seemed to know it."

The second description was penned by David Avadon. He identifies Mr. Lewis' description as a handling by "Martin Gardner, Dai Vernon, and Dr. Jacob Daley." In his article, Mr. Avadon details "Joe's own handling", entitling it as: "The Berg Knot--Berg's Handing."

Both articles are profusely illustrated with line drawings, and Mr. Avadon's description also includes a cool variant with a ring.

Finally, the text contains this tantalizing tidbit: "Jon Racherbaumer, as well, has an excellent version of the knot."

Re: Dai Vernon

Posted: November 6th, 2016, 11:52 am
by Leonard Hevia
Mike Henkel's copy of Zarrow is still available on eBay. I can't believe no one has snagged it. From the photo it looks like it was never opened. The card magic within is fantastic and from a first generation student of Vernon no less. I have a photo in my collection of Vernon enjoying dinner at Herb's house with other guests. It's a reminder that Zarrow never left the Professor's class.