FIGURE THIS

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Larry Horayne
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FIGURE THIS

Postby Larry Horayne » June 24th, 2003, 10:24 pm

Now, you fellows are an intelligent group.
How do you interpret this effect description?

Ask a spectator to check your pulse. She sees her watch ticking and feels your normal pulse.

At just the right moment your pulse stops.

At the very same moment your spectator's watch stops ticking. It literally stops dead in its tracks.

Then... at your command the spell is broken and your pulse resumes along with the second hand on her watch.

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 25th, 2003, 12:00 am

I'm not quite sure that I understand your question. (And I'm certainly not sure that I qualify as intelligent.)

I can see how this effect can be achieved. It isn't difficult to do it.

I'm not sure what "at just the right moment" means, but I presume that it means that it's at the moment that the spectator's watch stops. And it's therefore tautologous.

But other than that, what's the question?

Dave

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Dustin Stinett
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Dustin Stinett » June 25th, 2003, 12:04 am

Sorry Sandy, like Dave, I'm having more trouble interpreting your question. The effect description sounds straightforward to me, and I can think of a method or two. Of course, I don't have a clue what tautologous means, so apparently I'm not even in Dave's league when it comes to intelligence.

Dustin

Larry Horayne
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Larry Horayne » June 25th, 2003, 6:28 am

After reading the effect description, I want you to tell me exactly what you believe happens when it is performed. The description is HIGHLY deceiving -- can you spot the deception?

Larry Horayne
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Larry Horayne » June 25th, 2003, 6:39 am

Sorry if this may be confusing -- It's possible you didn't understand the premise of my question.

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Dustin Stinett
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Dustin Stinett » June 25th, 2003, 8:23 am

"She sees her watch ticking..."

You can presume from the description that the watch remains on her wrist. However, there is a very good chance that it does not.

Dustin

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Pete Biro
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Pete Biro » June 25th, 2003, 8:52 am

when someone takes your pulse they look at their watch.... so they see the second hand is moving (I assume)... but what if it is digital.

And, how many of today's digital domain youngsters know what you mean when you say something rotates CLOCKWISE?

:rolleyes:
Stay tooned.

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 25th, 2003, 9:08 am

If the question is how would you categorize the effect, I would say sympathetic magic--the watch stops/the pulse stops. It can be read as a death and resurrection trick. When you die, time stops. When you are reborn, time starts up again.

Nice idea.

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 25th, 2003, 9:31 am

Originally posted by Sandy Singer:
After reading the effect description, I want you to tell me exactly what you believe happens when it is performed. The description is HIGHLY deceiving -- can you spot the deception?
Well, what I think is happening is as follows.

The spectator has an analogue watch, and its working (the second hand being seen to be moving).

She feels your pulse, presumably at your wrist.

The watch may be on her wrist. If it isn't, then I guess that you're holding it in your non-pulse-taken hand.

Two things then happen simultaneously she detects the cessation of your pulse, and she (and everybody else) can see that her watch has stopped (since the second hand no longer moves).

After a short pause, she detects your pulse again, and she (and everybody else) can see that her watch is now working (since the second hand now moves).

(The location of your other hand, the one which is not having its pulse taken, isnt mentioned. But its relevant. Yes, I know, its located on the end of your arm. But you know what I mean, Im sure.)

And I see no deception in the description. So my assumptions are presumably wrong.

Dave

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MaxNY
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby MaxNY » June 26th, 2003, 4:43 am

A couple of years ago I constructed an egg-timer that "stops" time. It wasn't until after I built this, I realized that you can purchase this trick from some shops. I'm not too sure this will help you, probably not. Nobody takes a pulse by an egg-timer.
---Did you ever get to see Blaine stop his heart on the Carson Daily show?

Larry Horayne
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Larry Horayne » June 26th, 2003, 6:20 am

Read the effect description carefully. It CLEARLY states it is HER, THE SPECTATOR'S WATCH, ON HER WRIST. If so, why are you buying a watch from the manufacturer?

Jeff Eline
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Jeff Eline » June 26th, 2003, 7:08 am

The only possible deception I can spot is the assumed position of the magician and the specator when her watch stops.

My assumption is that the spectator would be holding the magician's wrist while looking at her watch. The magician's other hand is at his side.

However, my guess would be that the magician would have to be holding the watch or at least her wrist with the watch.

And that's certainly not as clean as the description implies. Then again, when have descriptions ever matched the actual workings of an effect?

Ian Kendall
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Ian Kendall » June 26th, 2003, 7:39 am

I've reread the description and it does not say anywhere that the watch is on her wrist...

However, I think we are missing the point. In the description 'at just the right moment' the pulse stops.

I think you have your pulse taken by a lady for, ooh, three or four weeks. At some point her watch will stop, and just then your pulse stops by your favourite method (but most likely from not eating or sleeping for three or four weeks while you waited for the watch to stop).

Snide comments aside, I believe the deception lies in the order of events.

Take care, Ian

Frank Yuen
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Frank Yuen » June 26th, 2003, 8:45 am

I'm pretty sure that Sandy is referring to a new effect out called "The Paradox Watch" and he is questioning why you are buying a watch when the ad says the spectators watch stops. Not having the effect but being familiar with how to stop watches, I would guess that the watch you purchase is used to stop the spectators watch. It puts the gimmick in a convenient spot right on your wrist.

Frank Yuen

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Pete Biro
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Pete Biro » June 26th, 2003, 9:56 am

Maybe you get a spectator that does NOT have a watch... say, "Here put this on, you'll need it to time something." :rolleyes:

Sandy... don't be a cheap screw... buy the trick and tells us what it really is. :eek:
Stay tooned.

Dave Egleston
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Dave Egleston » June 26th, 2003, 3:18 pm

I'm sorry Sandy -

No matter how it's written -

Still sounds like boring one-on-one magic.

Probably could be performed with stuff you've already got on hand

Dave

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 27th, 2003, 6:12 am

You are right, sounds like a rubber ball and a kinetic watch. Or some gimmicked watch that stops the spectators. Learning how to stop your pulse was discovered actually pretty early on in my studies for some reason and I think more people than what's realized know where that artery is in your arm. Has this effect been audience tested and if so, how was their reaction? Or is this a magician pleaser?

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 27th, 2003, 6:37 am

Originally posted by Justin Hart:
Or some gimmicked watch that stops the spectators.
I want one of those!!!

Brian Marks
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Brian Marks » June 27th, 2003, 7:10 am

Originally posted by Dave Egleston:
I'm sorry Sandy -

No matter how it's written -

Still sounds like boring one-on-one magic.

Probably could be performed with stuff you've already got on hand

Dave
Steve Cohen did a trick where his stopped pulse in his chamber magic show. This effect killed the 2x I saw him do it.

Richard Tremblay
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Richard Tremblay » June 27th, 2003, 7:11 am

Originally posted by Justin Hart:
Has this effect been audience tested and if so, how was their reaction? Or is this a magician pleaser?
Justin,

I tried it in my teens with some nurse student who practiced taking blood pressure. I explained to them that with practice, I was able to stop my blood circulation. They were very impressed.

One of them then ask me to take the pressure on my other arm. :whack:

Richard Tremblay :rolleyes:

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 27th, 2003, 7:57 am

Richard,

hehe, sounds like me...we just have to remember to bring two of those thigns that cost 50 cents. ;) But I still don't understand Sandy's question...and neither did anyone else it seems...also, how did David Blaine get mentioned in this? hahahahaha

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 27th, 2003, 8:03 am

Originally posted by Sandy Singer:
Now, you fellows are an intelligent group.
How do you interpret this effect description?

Ask a spectator to check your pulse. She sees her watch ticking and feels your normal pulse.

At just the right moment your pulse stops.

At the very same moment your spectator's watch stops ticking. It literally stops dead in its tracks.

Then... at your command the spell is broken and your pulse resumes along with the second hand on her watch.
Rubber ball, PK magnet. Won't work with a digital watch, Rolex or any analog watch that does not have a second hand or is anti-magnetic (which includes most Timex products).

The deception is in assuming that we are an intelligent bunch of people (just kidding, guys...guys! AAARRGH!!!!) :p

Lee (tongue firmly in cheek) Darrow, C.Ht.
http://www.leedarrow.com

Steve Hook
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Steve Hook » June 27th, 2003, 8:06 am

Justin:

I think Frank Yuen already solved the mystery: It can't truly be "the spectator's watch" if the ad is for the necessary trick watch.

I'm with Frank, which means Sandy did fail to mention what the ad was in reference to.

Steve

Frank Yuen
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Frank Yuen » June 27th, 2003, 8:50 am

Actually, I'm sure the ad is 100% correct. It IS the spectator's watch that stops. However, the watch that you are purchasing is what causes it to stop.

I don't think Sandy was trying to stump anyone, I think he thought the ad was deceptive and wanted our opinions.

Frank Yuen

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 27th, 2003, 9:49 am

Wait, wait - I know what the deception is. The add states that the watch "literally stops dead in its tracks."

That is, of course, impossible since the watch is not living and is not in any tracks. Just another misuse of the word literally. If people keep using it improperly for emphasis, we're going to have to invent another word that actually means literally.

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 27th, 2003, 9:50 am

Wait, wait - I know what the deception is. The add states that the watch "literally stops dead in its tracks."

That is, of course, impossible since the watch is not living and is not in any tracks. Just another misuse of the word literally. If people keep using it improperly for emphasis, we're going to have to invent another word that actually means literally. :rolleyes:

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Pete Biro
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Pete Biro » June 27th, 2003, 10:54 am

OK, here is my version. You palm a little sticker that covers the watch face. ON it it says, "Say My Watch Has Stopped! Eeeek!" :D :D :D
Stay tooned.

Guest

Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Guest » June 29th, 2003, 12:43 am

The watch provided when you buy the trick (Paradox Watch) is one that you wear yourself. When it comes into close enough proximity with the spectator's watch, then it will stop the spectator's (analog) watch immediately.

The pulse stopping extra is method as known.

If the watch stopping effect interests you, what makes this method so effective is that the Paradox watch itself has been designed from the ground up, rather than adapting an existing watch. This means its range is far greater than you would expect.

Scott

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Tim Ellis
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Tim Ellis » June 29th, 2003, 7:03 am

Then there's this version where the gimmicked watch actually stops the SPECTATOR'S PULSE! It's a real killer.

Bill Duncan
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Bill Duncan » June 29th, 2003, 10:57 am

Originally posted by Scott Eccles:
If the watch stopping effect interests you, what makes this method so effective is that the Paradox watch itself has been designed from the ground up, rather than adapting an existing watch. This means its range is far greater than you would expect.
Scott,
What happens when I open my wallet filled with credit and magnetic id cards using the hand that wears the watch?

Is there a "bonus" effect?

Jonathan Townsend
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Jonathan Townsend » June 29th, 2003, 11:07 am

Originally posted by Scott Eccles:
If the watch stopping effect interests you, what makes this method so effective is that the Paradox watch itself has been designed from the ground up, rather than adapting an existing watch. This means its range is far greater than you would expect.
I'm wondering;

Do people still wear ticking watches? Are there any side effects and residual effects of the method that stops their watch? Is there a version that works on digital watches or PDAs?

If this item comes with a watch that you wear, how comfortable/pleasant looking is it?

And does it stop 'squiddies' at 10 feet? :rolleyes:
Mundus vult decipi -per Caleb Carr's story Killing Time

Kevin Baker
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Re: FIGURE THIS

Postby Kevin Baker » June 30th, 2003, 4:41 am

Originally posted by Tim Ellis:
Then there's this version where the gimmicked watch actually stops the SPECTATOR'S PULSE! It's a real killer.
Yeah. Those cyanide darts get em every time...


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