Respect for Doug Henning

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P.T.Widdle
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 23rd, 2014, 2:16 pm

Talk about misdirection.

I resurrected this five year-old thread to make a pretty modest point about Doug Henning not appearing in any childrens' magic books that also contain historical tidbits about magicians. I don't know how you got from there to making some high-minded claims about the lack of value in writing historical magic non-fiction in general. Are you saying Steinmeyer's "Glorious Deception" for example, would have been more valuable as a novel?

As far as laymen remembering Henning or any other magician, that's more misdirection. I think it's without question that countless laymen who have seen Henning remember him. As to whether they "should at this late date?" I'm not sure what that means. My uncle, a layman, saw The Magic Show, and he still brings it up from time time.

What I'm talking about is affording the respect due to Henning by the magic fraternity in general, and in this particular instance, young magicians picking up beginner magic books for the first time.

As was stated so fantastically well by Dustin in the previous post, and bears repeating again, "Doug Henning's impact on magic from the mid 1970s on cannot be dismissed at any level... Doug Henning was damned important to the history of magic and deserves a high place among the greatest names regardless of how many years he was on "the scene."

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Brad Jeffers
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Brad Jeffers » December 23rd, 2014, 3:30 pm

P.T.Widdle wrote:I resurrected this five year-old thread to make a pretty modest point about Doug Henning not appearing in any childrens' magic books that also contain historical tidbits about magicians.

I have no familiarity with children's magic books.

Is this a single book to which you are referring, or is there a long list of children's magic books which contain historical tidbits about magicians but do not include Henning.

Who are the authors of these books?

What would you suppose would be the motivation for a writer, to not include Henning? I cannot think of any.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby benjamintalbot » December 23rd, 2014, 3:43 pm

In reply to the Ed Sullivan crack about magicians; and to paraphrase another's quote: Sir, I heard the Beatles; and Doug Henning is no Beatle. On the other hand; lighten up--bashing Doug Henning because he was trendy and boring is like bashing Barney because he was purple---and, well yes, a lot like Doug Henning. :D

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 23rd, 2014, 4:02 pm

There is no "Doug Henning bashing" going on in this thread.
And I suspect Widdle is referring to my book Knack Magic Tricks.
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 23rd, 2014, 4:23 pm

The book I was originally referring to was Joshua Jay's new Big Magic For Little Hands. Another relatively recent one is Gabe Fajuri's Mystero's Encyclopedia of Magic and Conjuring, and yes, Knack Magic Tricks. All excellent books, and all available to the general public in standard book stores (probably still the most common place for adults to buy kids magic books).

Brad Jeffers wrote:What would you suppose would be the motivation for a writer, to not include Henning? I cannot think of any.


Simple. They do not think Henning is worthy of inclusion, if they even think of him at all.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Brad Henderson » December 23rd, 2014, 6:34 pm

and if they do not think of him at all, is that not as good a reason as any to suggest that his ommission would not be missed?

I am a huge henning fan. I believe he was very important in our world. However I think you assume that all authors of childrens magic books intend to actually teach children about magic - or that teaching about magic consists of more than just explaining tricks.

while you and I may agree that historical figures would be great to include - my experience suggests that trick and page count are far more important a decision than content.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Bill Mullins » December 23rd, 2014, 6:56 pm

If I were writing a book about magic for kids, and I wanted to include historical references to magicians, I'd pick from two categories:

1. Big name magicians, like Houdini, Blackstone, Thurston.

2. Lesser known, but were important to the growth of magic, like Vernon, Hofzinser, Marlo.

Henning is important, but doesn't rise to the top of either category. So I'd probably leave him out.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Dustin Stinett » December 23rd, 2014, 7:08 pm

The problem with that, Bill, is one of the reasons magic flourished and went into an incredible renaissance--as noted in "The Story of Magic," it's "new Golden Age--is Doug Henning. Without that new Golden Age, which brought about a new generation of performers like Blaine (and is only just beginning to wane; maybe), a lot of recent beginners books would not be around.

And to put Marlo above Henning when it comes to a tyro's first exposure to the history of magic is, I think, rather misguided. Marlo did little when it comes to exposing magic to the laity and inspiring youngsters to become magicians in the first place.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Roger M. » December 23rd, 2014, 7:49 pm

With Doug Henning, you have somebody who truly stood alone, as Doug stood alone at a time when most, if not all the general public had left magic smoldering in the ashes of its demise (except for kids watching Mark Wilson, as I did).

At his time in history, there was Doug ... and there was only Doug (as far as the general public was concerned). David Copperfield followed Doug, and D.C. has managed to keep it all going to this very day.

Dustin, Brad, and P.T. are the ones that are on the right side of magics history ... many of the remainder posting to this thread display clearly the creeping and insidious disrespect for Doug Henning that has (unfortunately) become commonplace when discussing the history of stage magic.

The first (and debatably, "only") successful singular Broadway show featuring magic - "The Magic Show"
Multiple network television specials, in an era when there was ONLY network television. Those specials watched for the first time in the history of stage magic by millions of people at one sitting.

Doug Henning single handedly resurrected magic from its own grave (where it had languished for many years), and not just made it notable, but took it on to dominate (for the first time in history) the two most powerful live entertainment fields at the time, Network Television and the Broadway stage.

A little respect for Doug Henning from everybody associated with magic might be something the art and craft of magic owes him.
Doug was an entertainer with a capital "E".
Entertainers are always products of the era in which they come to the fore, and continue to perform in.
That Doug's powerful persona was that of a peace loving hippie finding wonder everywhere he looked in the early 1970's should never be used as the measure of his relevance in magic history.
Simply put, the reason he dominated the Broadway stage and Network Television was because he looked, sounded, and behaved like most of the rest of young North Americans looked, sounded, and behaved.

With Doug, the magic audience actually felt for the fist time that the magician onstage was truly one of them, and with that thought, Doug Henning, "The Magician" connected deeply with almost every single person who either watched television, or attended live performances. And he connected with an uplifting, positive message about life itself.
Doug's "magic" was presented simply as the magic of everybody living a wondrous life.

Yeah, a little more respect for Doug Henning in the magic history press is in order.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 23rd, 2014, 8:10 pm

Roger M. wrote:... a little more respect for Doug Henning in the magic history press is in order.


Folks who care have lots of respect for what he did. Some carry the way he did it as a best practice model for attitude about magic.

Those who want to explore the past of magical entertainment will meet Doug Henning and his smile along the way. As they will Harry Blackstone Jr's radio voice and Thurston's reputation and Houdini's self liberating ...

But what's this demand and outcry that retail product magic books for children must show and tell about Doug Henning? Do you really want to institutionalize turning to face the Court Theater every time you do the Anderson Flash Newspaper trick? [snark]how about including a audio clip of Vernon's voice saying "that's terrible" and references to erdnase too? [/snark]
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 23rd, 2014, 8:28 pm

There is a little section in the Joshua Jay kids book called "Teamwork" with an illustration of Siegfried and Roy as an example. Later on there is section called "What Should I Wear?" where Jay suggests wearing something comfortable because you'll be moving around a lot. He also suggests wearing something "cool but classy" with an illustration of a kid wearing a bow tie and a formal jacket.

It seems to me that section would be a great opportunity to mention Doug Henning. Not that Jay should be advocating for kids to wear outfits with stars and rainbows (although, who knows, that may appeal to some kids, male or female), but that, as Henning showed, you can be non-traditional about what you choose to wear, comfortable, but your outfit can still convey that sense of "wonder", etc.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Bill Mullins » December 23rd, 2014, 8:54 pm

Dustin Stinett wrote:The problem with that, Bill, is one of the reasons magic flourished and went into an incredible renaissance--as noted in "The Story of Magic," it's "new Golden Age--is Doug Henning. Without that new Golden Age, which brought about a new generation of performers like Blaine (and is only just beginning to wane; maybe), a lot of recent beginners books would not be around.

This is all true. It is also a level of detail that is more appropriate for an adult history book (like the companion book to the PBS "Art of Magic" of 1998), I think, than a kid's magic book.



And to put Marlo above Henning when it comes to a tyro's first exposure to the history of magic is, I think, rather misguided. Marlo did little when it comes to exposing magic to the laity and inspiring youngsters to become magicians in the first place.


A "tyro's first exposure to the history of magic" would, in this context, be a short passage in a book of tricks (pretty much all kid's magic books are books of tricks). There wouldn't be enough depth (at least, in any book I'd write) to reach to Henning. That's not a slam on him, just a reflection of my sensibilities and opinions about who's who in magic history. Henning isn't in the very top tier, and my kid's book (and, apparently, the kid's books of nearly every one else) doesn't reach into the second tier.

And it's not that I'd put Marlo above Henning -- they are in different categories. Yes, I'd put Houdini, Blackstone, Thurston, Copperfield and maybe some others above Henning in the category of "famous magicians who reached the highest levels of show biz for their times". Marlo's in a different category, along with Vernon and Hofzinser, and Henning really doesn't fit in that one at all.

One reason that Henning doesn't get the props that some say he should may be that his influence is diffuse. You can look at magic before Houdini, and again after he became famous, and point to differences that are directly attributable to him. You could do the same with Siegfried and Roy (in terms of the big animal act), Annemann and Dunninger (magician as mentalist), Robert-Houdin (magic as respectable evening entertainment) David Blaine, and others.

Henning made waves between 1974 (Magic Show) and about 1983 (Merlin). If pressed, I couldn't point to something in magic in 1973, and again in 1984, and say "these are different because of Doug Henning". He was HUGE during that interval, though -- his 1975 special was 3rd in the ratings for the week, and his 1976 special was 9th in the ratings and was seen by 15.9 million households. He was about the only "big" name in magic during the late 1970s, and so if you came of age in magic during that time, he was the big media star. He would loom large in the memories of magicians who are between 45 and 55 now (they would have been in their adolescence and late teens at Henning's peak). But the things he did didn't really stick -- no more big Broadway shows, no more performing arts grants, and his performing style was totally unique to him. He did start the tradition of annual magic specials that Copperfield and World's Greatest Magic continued, but it's hard to say that DC and WGM happened because of Henning -- they were pretty big deals on their own.

It's been said that the definition of "golden age" is "whatever was going on when you were 13". In my case, Batman peaked with Neal Adams and Denny O'Neil, and there will never be a baseball team like the Big Red Machine. For some, Henning is important in history because he was important in their history.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Dustin Stinett » December 23rd, 2014, 10:06 pm

We're just going to have to agree to disagree. By 1973 I was eight years into magic, five into its serious study. I witnessed the change--and it was a major change--in attitude that the laity had for magic in general after Doug Henning made his mark on the art. It grew like wildfire after that. And it has not diminished much. Yes, that's because people like David Copperfield then David Blaine came along to keep it going. But it was Doug Henning who kicked magic in its floundering butt and got it moving again. And I think that fact is well worth remembering and passing on to the generations that follow ours.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 24th, 2014, 11:46 am

Doug Henning definitely had the impact that Dustin noted--there's no question about that. But he left no overt visible legacy for anyone 45 or younger to latch onto. No one is performing in that style today. That style, and his personality, was of a certain time.
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Bill Marquardt » December 24th, 2014, 11:57 am

Doug Henning gets proper recognition in the new book by Michael A. Perovich, The Vernon Companion, on pages 315-316. Perovich says, "... Henning's success put big-time illusion-show magic back before the public," and "...(his) energy gave magic a shot in the arm that would last for decades."

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Aaron Sterling » December 24th, 2014, 12:39 pm

Richard Kaufman wrote: But he left no overt visible legacy for anyone 45 or younger to latch onto.

That's a temporary reproduction rights issue. "Temporary" might last for quite a while, but once someone publishes the TV specials at, say, $25 each, Henning will have a significant impact.

I recently went through the Miracle Factory's DVD on Georges Melies with someone, as part of the design of a steampunk-ish illusion show. Theoretically, I could have done that without the DVD, since all surviving Melies movies have been collected for a long time. But I wouldn't have. Maybe that points to my laziness, but, at least for me, it made a real difference that someone else had culled the magic-related movies, and wrapped them all together with a nice little bow.

Same thing with Henning, I believe. Sure, we could pay $100+ for an out of print copy of a crappy version of The Magic Show, or surf the torrents trying to find something low quality, but how many people are really going to do that? Not me. Once the TV specials are remastered and professionally packaged and introduced, they will change the performance of (some people's) magic.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 24th, 2014, 1:10 pm

Bill Marquardt wrote:Doug Henning gets proper recognition in the new book by Michael A. Perovich, The Vernon Companion, on pages 315-316. Perovich says, "... Henning's success put big-time illusion-show magic back before the public," and "...(his) energy gave magic a shot in the arm that would last for decades."


And let's not forget he put close-up magic back before the public as well (with both himself and Ricky Jay)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06O46DjlvzQ

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 24th, 2014, 1:22 pm

I strongly doubt that anyone will ever put a collection of Hennings TV specials on the market. There would not be enough interest to support a release from a commercial company.
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Roger M. » December 24th, 2014, 2:21 pm

It's self-fulfilling Richard, nobody writes about Doug when referencing magic history, nobody celebrates his groundbreaking TV shows with a DVD package, and therefore awareness of Doug and his contribution to magic continues to wane.

It's a shame really, as Doug is the reason magic maintains enough profile today to remain relevant.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 24th, 2014, 3:32 pm

It's not self-fulfilling: it's the economics of business.

And I think we have David Copperfield, David Blaine, Penn & Teller, and Criss Angel to thank for whatever position magic has in the public eye today. Doug Henning did his last live show over a quarter century ago.
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Dustin Stinett » December 24th, 2014, 3:33 pm

Here's something else to consider: The "What if?" had Henning not voluntarily retired from magic to pursue his interests in TM. Add to that the considerable buzz that was going around magic when it was rumored that he might be making a comeback. He was making appearances at magic shops and contacting illusion designers. Of course, it turned out that he had terminal cancer (because he eschewed traditional treatments, but that is a whole different discussion that has no place here) and was revisiting his roots before the inevitable. Of course the "What if?" can never be answered. But I think that it is worth pondering if only for the sake of the incredible memories he already gave us.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Glenn Bishop » December 24th, 2014, 4:04 pm

Lets not forget Blackstone Jr. And his full scale full evening magic show.

And Mark Wilson's Magic Circus TV Specials. Along with guest appearances that he did in the 50's 60's and 70's.

If people here want to attribute a second golden age of magic to Doug Henning I don't think that magic has had a second golden age.

I have seen Copperfield, Henning, Andre Kole, and Blackstone Jr. All do live full evening shows. I would pick the best live full evening magic show was Blackstone Jr.

As for magic's state 2005 - 2014 and 2015?

I think that there has been to many TV magicians using editing or a camera trick to replace magicians skill. I don't think that the public is at all "fooled" by it.

So much for any second golden age - and that is what I think.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 24th, 2014, 4:09 pm

There is no point in asking "what if" because an answer cannot be given.
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Rick Ruhl » December 24th, 2014, 4:09 pm

Remember at that time we had NBC, CBS and ABC. In 1975 Herbert Schlosser was President of NBC.

Doug had the only magic specials on NBC until 1977, then the Cates Brothers worked out a deal with ABC to use David in the Magic of ABC.

In 1977 the great Fred Silverman was president of ABC. Im pretty sure he was the one that green lighted David.

This allowed them to pursure CBS for the first of many Magic of David Copperfield Specials.

In 1978 Laurence Tisch was President of CBS and then David took to running.

Keep in mind, this was ALL about money and ratings to the networks... Doug got great ratings, so CBS followed with David.

We had many years with specials from both Doug and David in the late 70's and early 80's.

I dont think we will ever see that again...

To me, Doug got me back into magic at 15. I had started when I was 8 and gave my first performance at 10, but at 13 I discovered girls.. then after Doug was on, all the girls would do is talk about him in high school.

So I grew my hair long, wore cool clothes and did card and coin magic for the girls at lunch.

it was Doug that proved a hippy could do magic.. and be cool doing it.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Bill Marquardt » December 24th, 2014, 4:16 pm

Image

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Brad Henderson » December 24th, 2014, 7:32 pm

P.T.Widdle wrote:It seems to me that section would be a great opportunity to mention Doug Henning. Not that Jay should be advocating for kids to wear outfits with stars and rainbows (although, who knows, that may appeal to some kids, male or female), but that, as Henning showed, you can be non-traditional about what you choose to wear, comfortable, but your outfit can still convey that sense of "wonder", etc.


That's a great idea. Tell us when your book is coming out? Tell us how the publisher reacted when you told them that your book is different because you will mention Henning? Perhaps you can use the book to teach kids to debunk psychics at the same time too.

Re Henning as influence:

When studying music history it seems that there are people who innovate and people who perfect. Henning opened the door to magic on TV. Yes, I know, Mark Wilson. But Mark never got the idea over to the mass market like Doug did. Without Doug there was no Copperfield, who arguable perfected magic on TV and became its highest exponent. We can argue why Henning was successful or whether someone else could have done it or not, but the fact remains - HE DID IT. He was the Houdin of the televised era. All magic since has essentially been following the format he set, even if they follow by rejecting it.

If I were writing a book for children and wanted to cover the history of magic, esp illusion, I think Henning is the person to mention. I have told the story of Henning many times in shows and classes. Young people are entranced at the thought of what he did and who he was. I would also mention Copperfield as he, more than anyone, continued on the path Doug blazed and defined magic for a least a generation or two.





Blackstone JR, as wonderful as he was, was merely the end of an era.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Tom Sawyer » December 25th, 2014, 5:26 am

Hi All,

This thread has a many insights into the broader issue of what makes a magician historically important. But interestingly, it appears that there is no consensus on the subject of where Doug Henning belongs in any orthodox hierarchy of magicians.

Frequency-graphs such as the one linked-to here may ultimately prove helpful in analyzing such questions. The time period in this graph ends in or around 2008:

Link to page with graph.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Rick Ruhl » December 25th, 2014, 6:24 am

To me, Doug Henning ushered in the second golden age of magic from 1974-1995. After that, touring shows became few and far between.

David always did touring shows up until 2010, I think. Now he's in Vegas and doesn't tour 300 days a year, but still performs. Even today, he has 3 shows, 4 PM, 7 PM and 9:30 PM.

But I'm sure he'll be up early since Skye will be opening her presents from Santa.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 25th, 2014, 2:57 pm

I'm wary of raw big-data search results. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_Pie_the_Magician
for example. Or John Lennon fans from after his passing.

Kinda interseting to ask "what if" of Doug Henning and Peter Max enjoying a surge of popularity. Or perhaps Henning gets a haircut, and changes style to go "edgy", trading his taste in spandex and suede for a white shirt and black leather? Opening act for Blondie then and Madonna later on?

Merry Christmas to all and a nod to those who keep some of what Henning did alive in their work.
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Tom Sawyer » December 25th, 2014, 6:29 pm

Hi Jon,

There are definitely weaknesses in graphs like the one I showed.

However, here is another, for a different time period and with more smoothing. I imagine it would be difficult to "argue-away" the apparent significance of Dunninger and Kreskin. Of course, the graph ends in or around 2008.

Even so, if you add George Washington to the mix, or even my name (Tom Sawyer), most magician names become very compressed near the bottom of the graph. Still, someone like Robert-Houdin (not included in the graph) still manages to stand out.

One may hope to draw conclusions from the graphs, and, as you indicate, one can at the same time look for explanations as to why the graphs look the way they do.

Merry Christmas to all!

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 25th, 2014, 6:54 pm

And a Merry Christmas to you, Tom.

Why is David Copperfield not included on your graph?
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Brad Jeffers » December 25th, 2014, 8:34 pm

Since David Copperfield is also a Dickens character, it unfairly dominates ...
THUSLY

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Bill Mullins » December 26th, 2014, 1:45 am

Tom Sawyer wrote:
Frequency-graphs such as the one linked-to here may ultimately prove helpful in analyzing such questions. The time period in this graph ends in or around 2008:

Link to page with graph.


Odd that Kreskin spikes in the years that you would expect to see a Doug Henning spike (books are most likely a lagging indicator, especially compared to newspapers or magazines). And that during most of the span of the graph, Dunninger is the most-mentioned magician.

But what is really interesting is how Houdini so completely swamps all others: Link

As far as the writers of books indexed by Google, Houdini is the magician -- all others are minor blips.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Tom Sawyer » December 26th, 2014, 1:52 am

Hi Richard,

Brad's post shows the problem with including David Copperfield's name, but I'll elaborate a little in this post.

One of the first things I tried in an effort to avoid the problem was to preface names with the word "magician." It was not a perfect solution. And I just tried again with a number of names. Copperfield's line on the graph is above almost every other magician's line (in recent years). Harry Houdini's is above Copperfield's.

This graph demonstrates one aspect of the problem. When you add "magician," then Dunninger, Kreskin, and Angel drop off the graph completely:

Link to graph.

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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Brad Jeffers » December 26th, 2014, 2:11 am

These graphs are kind of fun to play around with.
I believe THIS ONE would have made Vernon smile.


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Richard Kaufman
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Joined: July 18th, 2001, 12:00 pm
Favorite Magician: Theodore DeLand
Location: Washington DC
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Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 27th, 2014, 8:31 pm

Erdnase would surely get a chuckle out of that.
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JD_
Posts: 1
Joined: January 2nd, 2015, 4:03 am
Favorite Magician: Paul Harris

Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby JD_ » January 2nd, 2015, 4:10 am

Have been fascinated and engrossed by magic since I was 11 years old.

I'm now 48, a married father of three and retired investment banker. I remain avid to the art.

Like most, I love close-up. If you do the math, you'd be right in guessing Paul Harris was a major influence.

Two other magicians overshadowed everything over my formative years and, living in Montreal, I was able to see them both perform live: David Copperfield and Doug Henning.

At the time, they both had widespread mindshare among lay audiences, let alone magicians. As it was, and shall always remain for world-class performers, that is all they sought, whatever the motive.

Copperfield's obviously still at it.

How many late magicians – for all their weaknesses - are still discussed, dissected, and debated today?

Even if it's generational, because it always is.

Respect, Doug...

...you corn flake.

JD

Clifford the Red
Posts: 4
Joined: July 12th, 2009, 5:39 am

Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby Clifford the Red » January 5th, 2015, 7:25 pm

Starting with my first bit of magic at age 5, I became enthralled with magic when Doug showed up because he made it not about a coifed man performing tricks in a stuffy tux as I was previously seeing (sometimes horrific colored tuxes), but doing magic as who you were. He made it not about tricking or fooling people with puzzles to be solved, but going back to our roots and making our performances magical to help people experience wonder.

We all have our influences. I saw all sorts of magicians growing up in LA, Blackstone Jr, etc, but Doug was the first one that I would say is a real profound influence in my art. He propelled me into truly wanting to be a magician. He was in the kids mags and I saw him in Vegas and went backstage to meet him. As nice in person as he appeared, a genuine person, he deeply encouraged me. I have the deepest of respect for him and what he brought to the table.

I was sad for his departure from the art, but we all must follow our own path. Even if I thought it foolish, I could not deny he was always kind. In his last years as he began to feel the stirrings of magic again, I was hopeful, but then had to mourn his tragic death.

We should never be so arrogant to deny we see further because we stand on the shoulders of giants. Doug was one of my giants.

billmccloskey
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Joined: June 10th, 2011, 2:11 pm

Re: Respect for Doug Henning

Postby billmccloskey » January 7th, 2015, 1:11 pm

" No one is performing in that style today. "

Well, you would know better than me, but in my opinion Jeff McBride is directly from the Henning tradition.


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