ERDNASE

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Joe Pecore
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Joe Pecore » August 12th, 2015, 8:22 am

mam wrote:If anyone wants any word sequence comparison between two texts, I already wrote a script for that. It looks at n-grams in a selected range (e.g. four words or more) in both texts. The default is to skip results with too many stop words (such as "of", "a", and other very common and generic ones) but it does not have to. I'll put the script on GitHub when I'm not on such a shaky connection. But in any case, just send me the text files and I'll do the comparison. This is by no means a proper linguistic analysis, I wrote it just to see if I could find any common relatively unique sentences in both Erdnase and Gallaway. The results from that is in this thread a few pages back.

Very nice.
I downloaded and tried to get http://evllabs.com/jgaap/w/index.php/Main_Page running, but I think it's having trouble parsing the PDF files I have for Erdnase, Sanders, and Gallaway. I thought maybe someone else would like to take a shot at it though.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby DChung » August 12th, 2015, 10:05 am

Joe Pecore wrote:I downloaded and tried to get http://evllabs.com/jgaap/w/index.php/Main_Page running, but I think it's having trouble parsing the PDF files I have for Erdnase, Sanders, and Gallaway. I thought maybe someone else would like to take a shot at it though.


I don't have the PDFs for Sanders or Gallaway, but you or anybody else might want to just try and convert them to text yourself before inputting it in as it seems JGAAP may only limited conversion capabilities. Perhaps one of the online pdf to txt converters like this one: http://www.zamzar.com/convert/pdf-to-txt/ will do the job.

Derrick

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 12th, 2015, 10:22 am

I have discovered that Edward Gallaway not only lectured about printing and print estimating in front of students but also in front of executives of the printing industry - classes with about 60 people in session. You don't get to do this unless you are considered a leader in your profession. Edward Gallaway was an intellectual titan, founding the school of print estimating, lecturing there for years, and writing the first authoritative and comprehensive textbook on print estimating. These are all parallels to Erdnase's work. If you add that both books were published in the same fashion and that the linguistics are a close match then the picture is becoming quite clear.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Joe Pecore » August 12th, 2015, 11:13 am

DChung wrote:
Joe Pecore wrote:I downloaded and tried to get http://evllabs.com/jgaap/w/index.php/Main_Page running, but I think it's having trouble parsing the PDF files I have for Erdnase, Sanders, and Gallaway. I thought maybe someone else would like to take a shot at it though.


I don't have the PDFs for Sanders or Gallaway, but you or anybody else might want to just try and convert them to text yourself before inputting it in as it seems JGAAP may only limited conversion capabilities. Perhaps one of the online pdf to txt converters like this one: http://www.zamzar.com/convert/pdf-to-txt/ will do the job.

Derrick

That was going to be my next try (I have a program that will do it). Just need to find the time. The JGAAP is interesting, but it might take someone with more time and knowledge to fully understand all the ways to use it.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 12th, 2015, 11:52 am

Joe Pecore wrote:That was going to be my next try (I have a program that will do it). Just need to find the time. The JGAAP is interesting, but it might take someone with more time and knowledge to fully understand all the ways to use it.


Perhaps somebody with experience? Somebody who has done this type of analysis before? Oh, yeah that would make a lot of sense. Somebody like Dr. Olsson. What a new and novel thought!
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Joe Pecore » August 12th, 2015, 12:07 pm

lybrary wrote:
Joe Pecore wrote:That was going to be my next try (I have a program that will do it). Just need to find the time. The JGAAP is interesting, but it might take someone with more time and knowledge to fully understand all the ways to use it.


Perhaps somebody with experience? Somebody who has done this type of analysis before? Oh, yeah that would make a lot of sense. Somebody like Dr. Olsson. What a new and novel thought!


But he is expensive :)

From looking at the user's guide, it looks like what would be needed is many more examples of text from each author. Not sure if comparing one example from each is enough to really be useful.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Jonathan Townsend » August 12th, 2015, 12:39 pm

http://www.aicbt.com/authorship-attribu ... -software/

To argue for novel methods use - probably a good idea to demonstrate the utility and accuracy of the methods on known text. Consider some texts by Angelo Lewis as himself vs as Hoffmann - similar for Charles Dodgson as Lewis Carroll. Or Stephen King as himself vs his other pen names. How well do the tools work?
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Joe Pecore » August 12th, 2015, 12:46 pm

Looks like JGAAP may have been used to verify that J.K. Rowling wrote the detective novel The Cuckoo's Calling under the pen name Robert Galbrait http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=5315
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Carlo Morpurgo » August 12th, 2015, 1:20 pm

I also wrote a simple code using Mathematica in order to find the common 4-word sequences. I have the .txt version of EATCT, I just need any other book to compare it to. Honestly, it does not need to be by Sanders...Any technical book from that period could work just fine, in fact how about a magic book? Shoot one in pdf form, or even better in text form.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Joe Pecore » August 12th, 2015, 1:27 pm

Carlo Morpurgo wrote:I also wrote a simple code using Mathematica in order to find the common 4-word sequences. I have the .txt version of EATCT, I just need any other book to compare it to. Honestly, it does not need to be by Sanders...Any technical book from that period could work just fine, in fact how about a magic book? Shoot one in pdf form, or even better in text form.

Here are a bunch on Google Books: http://geniimagazine.com/magicpedia/Cat ... ogle_Books

You should be able to click through to Google and download any in Epub or PDF.


Sanders is there too https://books.google.com/books/about/Mi ... jBhjAATxwC
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Richard Stokes » August 12th, 2015, 2:49 pm

Coincidentally, I was about to make favourable comments about John Olsson two weeks ago but decided against doing so as I thought it might divert the debate. Chris Wasshuber has certainly hired the right person.

I have Olsson's fascinating book Word Crime : Solving Crime through Forensic Linguistics (2009).
Olsson is a genuine expert in this field. After reading his careful analysis of cases he has been involved in, I must admit that I am impressed by his thinking.

A woman is found dead from asphyxiation hanging from a cable tie in her garage. She has left a suicide note. But is this note genuine? Has she been murdered by her husband? (Read Olsson’s book to find out!)

Another chapter of Olsson’s book looks at the Da Vinci Code. Did Dan Brown plagiarise Lew Perdue’s earlier novels?
At first, I thought such an allegation was dubious, but I’m now sympathetic to Perdue’s cause.
Perdue lost the case , but make your own mind up:

http://www.davincilegacy.com/Infringeme ... eport.html

http://www.davincilegacy.com/Infringeme ... N2004.html

And plagiarism isn’t simply the blatant copying of someone else words (although this is how we might first visualise it). The plagiarist will try to disguise their theft by replacing key words. According to Olsson, these new substitute words tend to be second-line ‘left-overs’, statistically less likely to occur than their originals.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 12th, 2015, 3:26 pm

Richard, thanks. The purpose to hire an expert like Olsson is not so that you have somebody to run a software for you and tell you the result. The purpose is to have somebody who brings his own intellect, understanding, experience and expertise to the table. Somebody you can ask a question, bounce ideas of and learn from. I have spent in total about 2 hours on the phone with him and exchanged about 100 emails. My take away is that he is supremely qualified to help us figure this out and identify Erdnase.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Bill Mullins » August 12th, 2015, 3:57 pm

I think many of us who have been critical of his results as you have presented them would be more than willing to reevaluate our positions if you supplied some of what he must have told you throughout the emails and phone calls. Why is 130 matches significant?

And if you don't want to go farther because you plan on publishing it as a part of a ebook or some other project, that's a fair response. But in other places (like the book Stokes refers to), he not only gives conclusions, but says why he arrived at them. And that's what's missing here.

I shouldn't speak for others, but I've invested so much time and effort (and money) into the topics of this thread not because I expect to eventually find out who Erdnase was, but because the process is interesting. Give us some process.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 12th, 2015, 4:45 pm

My preferred outlet for futher details is my weekly newsletter. But ultimately all details will be published in my book on Gallaway being Erdnase. I am still in the discovery and research phase to further develop my understanding of his life. So don't expect the book soon. But it will certainly be written at some point.

In the meantime I will continue to share bits and pieces as I see fit here on this entertaining thread.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Carlo Morpurgo » August 12th, 2015, 9:04 pm

I ran the code that identifies common 4,5,6...n-word sequences between two text files. I used Erdnase's book against The Art of Magic. Not surprisingly there are many many 4-word sequences in common, but also many 5,6...-word sequences, and even entire paragraphs...maybe this was already a known fact, but I did not know it. There seem to be 4 longer paragraphs in common (either identical, or 99% so).

1. EATCT p. 28/AOMp. 40 "so that the first finger......about the middle"

2. EATCT p. 86/AOM p. 122 "Seize the deck.......slightly close the left hand with the palmed cards" (after "To palm..." the paragraphs are identical, before that they are 99% identical)

3. EATCT p. 39/AOM p 131: "Seize the deck....square up."

4. EATCT p. 166/AOM p.78: "thumb across top....toward the spectator"

Regarding the sequence count, I can offer a list of 868 5-word sequences shared by these books. Granted that both of these books are about magic, and that some of these common sequences appear as part of longer common sentences. I eliminated duplicates, but not the very few ones that are only differing by a comma or a period. I also did not eliminate common sequences that are part of longer ones - my guess is that there would still be a lot of common sequences.

I uploaded the list here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3Wpud ... BsaWc/view
I did not go through the whole list, but one of the sequences is particular:
"Cheap cards are clumsy and".

I am not reaching any conclusions, just stating some facts. It would be interesting to compare EATCT with other books.
Last edited by Carlo Morpurgo on August 12th, 2015, 10:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Carlo Morpurgo » August 12th, 2015, 10:10 pm

and here are the 2030 4-word sequences in common:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3Wpu ... VlPS25BTDA

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Larry Horowitz » August 13th, 2015, 2:56 am

Carlo,

Possibly what needs to be compared are not word sequences regarding technique, but rather those regarding deportment or thoughts on how and when to use a sleight.

I am not sure how many other authors cover these skills from the gambler's point of view. Certainly there are those from the magician's.

This may reflect the true "voice"of the author.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 13th, 2015, 6:27 am

Carlo, a couple of suggestions:

1) "The Art of Magic" has roughly 120,000 words. That is about 5x more than "Estimating for Printers." Perhaps take only the first 25000 words or so.

2) Take a non-magic and non-gambling book.

3) Take a book from roughly the same time period 1927.

4) Remove doubles which are only different due to capitalization or punctuation.

5) My understanding is that you have to stop your comparison at sentence boundaries. You seem to be doing comparisons across sentence boundaries.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby mam » August 13th, 2015, 6:52 am

lybrary wrote:Carlo, a couple of suggestions:

1) "The Art of Magic" has roughly 120,000 words. That is about 5x more than "Estimating for Printers." Perhaps take only the first 25000 words or so.

2) Take a non-magic and non-gambling book.

3) Take a book from roughly the same time period 1927.

Why does "Estimating for printers" have anything to do with a comparison between EATCT and Art of Magic?

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 13th, 2015, 7:09 am

mam wrote:
lybrary wrote:Carlo, a couple of suggestions:

1) "The Art of Magic" has roughly 120,000 words. That is about 5x more than "Estimating for Printers." Perhaps take only the first 25000 words or so.

2) Take a non-magic and non-gambling book.

3) Take a book from roughly the same time period 1927.

Why does "Estimating for printers" have anything to do with a comparison between EATCT and Art of Magic?


Because some want to check how significant the number of 4-word matches is between Estimating for Printers and EATCT. You would have to compare to a similar book. But maybe I am misunderstanding Carlo's intention. Maybe his goal is something entirely different.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Carlo Morpurgo » August 13th, 2015, 7:44 am

lybrary wrote:Carlo, a couple of suggestions:

1) "The Art of Magic" has roughly 120,000 words. That is about 5x more than "Estimating for Printers." Perhaps take only the first 25000 words or so.



Sure I thought about this and initially that is exactly what I was going to do. But I then thought that the structure of the narrative would have been ruined. In my opinion what counts is the relative size, and the ratio is still the same, roughly 1/2. Assuming a certain uniformity I suspect that the expected value of the occurrences when taking half of the pages of each book would be obtained by dividing by 4.

2) Take a non-magic and non-gambling book.

Yes I mentioned that, on the other hand, what if our suspect was a magician and only wrote books about magic? I'd be happy to run the program for other non gambling books from the time period.
3) Take a book from roughly the same time period 1927.

I don't get this. Wasnt EATCT published in 1902? Even if it weren't frankly I think that 20 years would not make a huge difference.
4) Remove doubles which are only different due to capitalization or punctuation.

I mentioned this, the number of those occurrences seems rather irrelevant
5) My understanding is that you have to stop your comparison at sentence boundaries. You seem to be doing comparisons across sentence boundaries.


Yes, but again, I am not sure how relevant those occurences are.....
Anyway this is just a small exercise which I put together in half a day, just to see an example. I did choose Art of Magic on purpose, since I once had some "suspicions". Speaking of which, I am interested to know what people think of those 4 long paragraphs appearing verbatim in both books.....
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 13th, 2015, 7:54 am

Carlo, your text selection depends on what you want to achieve. If your goal is to establish a comparison between the 4-word matches I posted, you would have to use a book somewhat comparable to Estimating for Printers. If however your goal is simply to compare other books then of course you can compare other books. But a magic or gambling book will show more matches purely because the subject is the same not because the authors are the same. Also books from around 1902 will generally match better because of common phraseology popular at that time. This again would not indicate the same author but simply the same period. So if you want to start to compare and argue about significance of number of matches you have to compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Carlo Morpurgo » August 13th, 2015, 8:05 am

lybrary wrote:Carlo, your text selection depends on what you want to achieve. If your goal is to establish a comparison between the 4-word matches I posted, you would have to use a book somewhat comparable to Estimating for Printers. If however your goal is simply to compare other books then of course you can compare other books. But a magic or gambling book will show more matches purely because the subject is the same not because the authors are the same. Also books from around 1902 will generally match better because of common phraseology popular at that time. This again would not indicate the same author but simply the same period. So if you want to start to compare and argue about significance of number of matches you have to compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges.


My initial intention was purely a curiosity. How easy it is to do such a comparison and what results it would yield. I really have no intentions of competing with your ideas. I take my search as a standalone comparison between two books, and I am still puzzled by some of the results.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Bill Mullins » August 13th, 2015, 8:30 am

It's funny how, with 50,000 source words and over a century to look at them, we can't figure out who Erdnase was, but you can spot M.ark L.ewis after only a few posts.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 13th, 2015, 8:53 am

Bill Mullins wrote:It's funny how, with 50,000 source words and over a century to look at them, we can't figure out who Erdnase was, but you can spot M.ark L.ewis after only a few posts.


I totally agree. And that is why I am happy that more people start to analyze the text. I believe there is a lot more that can be found from a careful analysis of the text.
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Jack Shalom » August 13th, 2015, 10:20 am

The paragraph matches of which Carlo points out clearly cannot be accidental or coincidental; there are only two possible explanations for matching paragraphs of such a technical nature:

1) Downs/Hilliard are Erdnase.

2) They deliberately cribbed the descriptions from Erdnase.

While 2) is probably more likely than 1), would it be possible for any of the participants here to briefly reiterate the case for/against the above?

edited to appease the grammar gods.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby John M. Dale » August 13th, 2015, 12:40 pm

Bill Mullins wrote:It's funny how, with 50,000 source words and over a century to look at them, we can't figure out who Erdnase was, but you can spot M.ark L.ewis after only a few posts.


You're not implying that ML is currently lurking around here are you? Certainly not as a "performer"? Surely, since he is psychic, he would know he'd (he'll?) be found out.

But, I'm not psychic, so my questions my be nonsense.

JMD

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Jonathan Townsend » August 13th, 2015, 12:50 pm

Project: using suspect and known ML writings to support the phrase matching hypothesis for claims of authorship.

Obvious by inspection?

Chris, how do you feel about using the ML/P posts as a test case? Derrick, Joe, Bill, mam, Bob - what do you think?
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 13th, 2015, 4:01 pm

Jonathan Townsend wrote:Chris, how do you feel about using the ML/P posts as a test case? Derrick, Joe, Bill, mam, Bob - what do you think?


I don't think forum posts are good test cases for our situation. Formal textbook writing is quite different to the colloquial writing on a forum. I am also not a linguist who is looking for a project. I already have enough projects on my table :-)
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Jonathan Townsend » August 13th, 2015, 4:16 pm

@Chris, not asking you to perform any analysis. This is about making an argument for authorship based upon statistics derived by comparing texts. Others have found some tools for use and jumped in to apply themselves - trying to see what kind compare/meaning processes are available. We could use the Declaration of Independence - say against Thomas Paine's writing and Thomas Jefferson's writing. The idea is to show an example of methods in use to obtain a meaningful result. In this case an ML detector. :)
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Bill Mullins » August 13th, 2015, 4:45 pm

Chris -- you've made much of Gallaway owning a 1st edition copy of EATCT in bolstering your case for him. The more I think about it, the less important I find it to be. Here's why:

You've assumed a printing (lower bound) of 2000 copies. Gallaway owned one of them (and we are assuming he was an original owner, not someone who bought a copy second hand). That means that there are 1999 other people who also owned a copy. If we assume that Erdnase owned a 1st edition copy, doesn't that imply that the chances of Gallaway = Erdnase based on ownership are only 1 in 2000?

You've also presumed that since Gallaway worked for McKinney, this makes him more likely than a random person to have been Erdnase, based on the logic that Erdnase knew McKinney before hiring him to print the book. Again, I don't think this helps his case, for this reason:

I believe that it is more likely than not that a person with Erdnase's expertise with a deck of cards would have had a job that is more conducive to developing that skill than a "trade" such as printing. Gambler, salesman on the road, saloon keeper, something like that. Printing seems too "square" for the man I envision Erdnase to be.

And back to the "original owner" issue. Who else besides Gallaway and Adrian Plate should we suspect were original owners of 1st edition copies? I'm asking about individuals who would have owned a copy, not dealers who would have owned them for resale. Hoffmann wrote about the book as soon as 1903 in correspondence, so I suppose he must have had one. Hilliar received what may have been a review copy. Jessel's 1905 bibliography mentioned a 1st edition copy, and his collection that ended up in the Bodleian Library included one, so he must have been an early buyer.

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Brad Henderson » August 13th, 2015, 5:05 pm

why would the author necessarily have a copy of his own book, especially if his goal were to sell them?

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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 13th, 2015, 5:24 pm

Bill Mullins wrote:Chris -- you've made much of Gallaway owning a 1st edition copy of EATCT in bolstering your case for him. The more I think about it, the less important I find it to be. Here's why:

You've assumed a printing (lower bound) of 2000 copies. Gallaway owned one of them (and we are assuming he was an original owner, not someone who bought a copy second hand). That means that there are 1999 other people who also owned a copy. If we assume that Erdnase owned a 1st edition copy, doesn't that imply that the chances of Gallaway = Erdnase based on ownership are only 1 in 2000?

And back to the "original owner" issue. Who else besides Gallaway and Adrian Plate should we suspect were original owners of 1st edition copies? I'm asking about individuals who would have owned a copy, not dealers who would have owned them for resale. Hoffmann wrote about the book as soon as 1903 in correspondence, so I suppose he must have had one. Hilliar received what may have been a review copy. Jessel's 1905 bibliography mentioned a 1st edition copy, and his collection that ended up in the Bodleian Library included one, so he must have been an early buyer.


Bill, I actually assumed 10,000 first edition copies of EATCT, not just 2000. But taking your numbers, yes, by that logic Gallaway is one of 2000 who had it. If you now combine it with the other things we know about Erdnase/Gallaway you can further reduce that number. For example the 'W' in the name. That means the 2000 owners of the book will shrink down to 200 owners, because less than 10% have a W in their surname. Etc. I don't want to repeat my entire calculation, but I agree with that one piece of it, which you have addressed.

Who those 2000 or 200, or even less if we factor in McKinney, are we don't know. We know a few like Adrian Plate, but the majority of them we don't know. But we don't have to for a statistical calculation. For such a calculation you are not attempting to identify anybody specific, you are asking how many do we expect there to be who all meet these requirements which apply to Erdnase.

Bill Mullins wrote:You've also presumed that since Gallaway worked for McKinney, this makes him more likely than a random person to have been Erdnase, based on the logic that Erdnase knew McKinney before hiring him to print the book. Again, I don't think this helps his case, for this reason:

I believe that it is more likely than not that a person with Erdnase's expertise with a deck of cards would have had a job that is more conducive to developing that skill than a "trade" such as printing. Gambler, salesman on the road, saloon keeper, something like that. Printing seems too "square" for the man I envision Erdnase to be.


No, I have not assumed that Gallaway is more likely because he worked for McKinney. He is simply among the group of people who had contact with McKinney so that they were in the position to order the book to be printed, which I have assumed to be 330 people (300 customers/suppliers and 30 employees).

I do agree with you that somebody working in a trade would have a harder time to practice. But it is not an awfully difficult hurdle to overcome. How many people hold two and three jobs today? There was enough time after work to practice. We also know that Gallaway worked at several different companies. I also have found information that before working at McKinney he started a company with two other partners. So he moves from one company to another, starts his own, takes employment, ... All of this tells me these were volatile times. Gallaway could have been unemployed for a portion of his formative years which would provide a lot of practicing time. But even without unemployment it is certainly not impossible to achieve mastery like Erdnase had.

One other comment regarding the earlier discussion on German culture and language use. I am reading the book "Chicago by Gaslight" which describes Chicago during 1880-1920. You may be surprised to learn that Chicago had several German newspapers and there were public addresses by speakers in German addressing thousands of assembled people in Chicago in parks. This means the German language was present on the streets. A German name like Erdnase would therefore hardly be unusual. I think your assumptions about the German language back then are incorrect.
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Brad Jeffers
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Brad Jeffers » August 13th, 2015, 5:38 pm

Brad Henderson wrote:Why would the author necessarily have a copy of his own book, especially if his goal were to sell them?

Brad, Don't you own a copy of The Dance?
I know that if I were ever to have a book published, I would certainly keep a copy for myself. I think it would be a rare case to find a writer who would not do so.

mam
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby mam » August 13th, 2015, 9:19 pm

Jonathan Townsend wrote:Project: using suspect and known ML writings to support the phrase matching hypothesis for claims of authorship.

Obvious by inspection?

Chris, how do you feel about using the ML/P posts as a test case? Derrick, Joe, Bill, mam, Bob - what do you think?

What/who is ML/P?

Tom Sawyer
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Tom Sawyer » August 13th, 2015, 10:09 pm

I think S.W. Erdnase very likely owned multiple copies of the book, initially. Ten years later, though, I would think the chances would be more like 50-50, or even less. Erdnase strikes me as having been mobile. People in general, and perhaps mobile people especially, have a lot of opportunities for forgetting things, leaving things behind, losing things, selling things, and giving things away.

Nonetheless, I tend to think this is the best argument that can now be made for Gallaway, namely: there would be no reason for Gallaway to own the book if he did not write it.

A problem there is that there are other good reasons why Gallaway would have owned a copy, the main one being that he was (apparently) interested in gambling (see The Man Who Was Erdnase, pages 57 and 390). (I suppose that could be turned into a weak argument in support of Gallaway, but I don't see it that way.)

--Tom Sawyer
At least for the time being, I have taken down my S.W. Erdnase blog.

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Brad Jeffers
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Brad Jeffers » August 13th, 2015, 10:23 pm

mam wrote:What/who is ML/P?

That would be ... M a r k L e w i s / performer
Richard Kaufman wrote:Mr. Lewis is here with my permission

And yet, if I were to type in his name (without the spaces) it will be auto-censored ...

Mark Lewis / performer

See.

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lybrary
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby lybrary » August 13th, 2015, 10:32 pm

Tom Sawyer wrote:Nonetheless, I tend to think this is the best argument that can now be made for Gallaway, namely: there would be no reason for Gallaway to own the book if he did not write it.


Plus a good number of other strong arguments for him:

- linguistic match
- had contact with McKinney to make the order for the book
- W in the surname
- matches description given by Smith
- his other self-published book mimics several aspects of EATCT
- his other book matches EATCT in terms of ground breaking importance on the subject
- plausible theory for the name S.W. Erdnase
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby mam » August 13th, 2015, 10:42 pm

Brad Jeffers wrote:
mam wrote:What/who is ML/P?

That would be ... M a r k L e w i s / performer
Richard Kaufman wrote:Mr. Lewis is here with my permission

And yet, if I were to type in his name (without the spaces) it will be auto-censored ...

[censored] / performer

See.

This one's over my head, I have no background whatsoever on ML but guessing that everyone else here has. (I'm new to the forums.)

Bill Mullins
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Re: ERDNASE

Postby Bill Mullins » August 14th, 2015, 12:17 am

M.ark L.ewis is currently posting as "performer" in another thread on the forum. He has a long history here. He has registered and then been banned/expelled under many different names at different times. He usually starts off with genuinely interesting contributions to threads (he has an extensive performing experience), but after a while devolves into trolling behavior and gets banned again. His online "voice" is pretty distinctive, and he can usually be recognized after only a few posts under a new name.

The forum software censors his name, thus the weird punctuation above.

Chris -- in your newsletter, you said you have a couple of photos of Gallaway. On pp 32 and 33 of this book are pictures of one of his classes in estimating. On p 32, on our left, is seated an older man in a bowtie. On p 33, he's standing on the right. Is this Gallaway?

(and note that p 36 of this book shows a photograph of a fourth book written by Gallaway, which has not yet been mentioned here.}
Last edited by Bill Mullins on August 14th, 2015, 10:12 am, edited 1 time in total.


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