"Ring on Rubber Band" history?

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Postby Guest » 01/27/02 11:13 AM

I'm looking to publish a "Ring on Rubber Band" effect and am trying to track down credit info. I would like to include a comprehensive history of this effect.

What I need to know is what versions have you seen or worked with, and what is the basic techinque employed? I'm not looking for the handling and routine, just the technique.

Example: Broken band, 2 bands, doubled band?

What are the others that you are aware of?

Mail me direct at pierce603@aol.com if it is more comfortable.

Thanks,

Jeff Pierce
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Postby Richard Kaufman » 01/27/02 11:54 AM

Hi Jeff,
The originator of the effect is Bill Kalush. It was first published in "Richard's Almanac" in 1982 or 1983 under the title "Rubber Ringer."
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Postby Guest » 01/27/02 12:26 PM

Thank you Richard for the credit info. I will be sure to include it in my publication.

Generally speaking, what was the technique employed? The reason I ask is I am looking for the different versions that might employ my technique so as to not step on anyones toes.

Jeff
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Postby Richard Kaufman » 01/27/02 01:13 PM

All of these effects are based on the same principle: the rubber band is looped through the ring, but because of the way in which the ring is held that can't be seen.
There are lots of variations!
Go to your local magic shop and read the trick in Richard's Almanac.
Better yet ... buy the book from me! :)
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Postby Guest » 01/27/02 02:01 PM

Thanks Richard, I'll look into it.

Jeff
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Postby Guest » 01/27/02 05:49 PM

From down under... Barry Govan's 'Ring Link' came out many years ago. Personally I've never worked with it, but am told that it is VERY deceptive.

(Available from Aldo Colombini)
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Postby Guest » 01/27/02 08:42 PM

You can view an online video of Simon Aronson's variant, "Ringleader," by clicking on this web page for his new book .

[ January 27, 2002: Message edited by: Ralph Bonheim ]
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Postby Guest » 01/27/02 09:12 PM

Jeff
My rubber band and ring routine "Ringleader" is in my new book Try the Impossible, p.269, and as Ralph mentions, I have a video performance of it on my website at www.simonaronson.com (on the New Book page).

My routine credits Bill Kalush's routine (the "original"), Michael Ammar's "Ring Band-It" (first printed in The Magical Arts Journal, Vol 1, #1 Aug '86, and later in The Magic of Michael Ammar, 1991, p. 135) and Dan Harlan's "Another Ringer" (A1 Multi-Media videotape, The Band-Shark, 1993). All three of those sources have strong elements and are worth consulting.

John Rogers includes his own routine in his recent lecture notes, and Tim Ellis (of Australia, currently doing a lecture tour here in the States) has a fine 3-phase routine (part of which I believe is based on Barry Govan's version).

Hope this helps.
Simon
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Postby Guest » 02/02/02 01:21 AM

Govan's ring link is very good.

I perform an original ring on rubber band with a doubled band. After linking the ring on to the band I break the rubber band and put it back together.

The ring gives a justification for breaking the band and then putting it back together again.

Now I just need a reason to put the ring on there in the first place....
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Postby Guest » 02/02/02 08:21 AM

Simon,
Thank you for the info. I watched the video on your website and your get ready is almost non-existant. This has always been the one thing that I disliked about ring on bubberband effects.

In Govan's "Ring Link
" the setup is so odd that you think that the spectator is definately going to comment on it, but they never do.

Nichoas,

Thank you for the info. If you use a original effect with the band doubled over, who do you credit? This is the method I use but my setup is less than one second and the band is locked in place. The original credit goes to Chris Kenner, who I meet last week and showed it to. He liked it and gave his ok to publish it.

Jeff
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Postby David Oliver » 02/02/02 10:19 AM

Hi Jeff -
There are two other linking rubberband effects that I know of that were published in Steve Beam's Trap Door magazine. Although neither involves a ring, the set-up and handling of the bands may be of interest to you. Both also give credit to Kalush's Rubber Ringer from Richard's Almanac. The two effects are Chris Kenner's "Battle of the Bands" and "The Power Link" by fellow Bostonian magician Steve Kradolfer. I'm not sure exactly how to contact Kenner these days (on the road with DC), but if you e-mail me privately, I can get you in touch with Steve.

Hope this helps.
-David Oliver
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Postby Guest » 02/02/02 01:37 PM

Now I just need a reason to put the ring on there in the first place....


If you're looking for humor how about making a reference to having your mittens sewn to your jacket when you were a little kid? The rubber band is to keep you from losing your wedding ring and your wife has taken the place of your mother in making sure you don't lose things...

"It got so bad that one day I goofed up at work and my boss called her into his office."

:D

[ February 02, 2002: Message edited by: Bill Duncan ]
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Postby Guest » 02/02/02 02:51 PM

Thank you for the info. If you use a original effect with the band doubled over, who do you credit? This is the method I use but my setup is less than one second and the band is locked in place. The original credit goes to Chris Kenner, who I meet last week and showed it to. He liked it and gave his ok to publish it.


I haven't credited anyone because I haven't published it. However, the starting point was Micheal Weber's LifeSavers (Stretching It pg. 139) which uses two linked bands. So I guess I credit him. I just checked and he credits Chris Kenner as well.

I can lock it into place and stretch it between two finers but I don't professionally because there is always the smallest chance that the band will come apart and since I am using a borrowed ring I don't want to risk it.

I'm more then happy to described my method in detail if you would like to compare it to yours.
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