Interesting MC bits

Discuss your favorite platform magic and illusions.

Postby Brad A._dup1 » 03/11/02 11:25 PM

Does anyone out there have any interesting MC bits they're willing to share?

I have an assortment of things I do...yet I'm trying to widen my view.

...any suggestions?
-Brad
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Postby M. Sibbernsen » 03/12/02 01:15 AM

Brad,

Here are a couple nice bits. Enjoy.

*"The Bag of Introductions"- aka Roasting without the heat.

When working at a magic club, where everyone already knows each other, this makes for a fun emcee bit.

"Roasting" as it is called, is a time honored tradition among friends, and a great source of comedy. Unfortunately, it can also backfire, and produce some ill feelings. Using the "Bag of Introductions" (a paper bag with this title written in bold across the face) can buffer these potential problems. All can clearly see the introductions (written on slips of paper) are random selections, and not actually aimed at anyone. They are truly all in good fun. Here are a few "introductions" I wrote for a club event a few months ago. You are welcome to use them in part or in whole. The main idea however is to help develop your own.

"Our next magician is a true wonder. As a matter of fact, we all wonder about this guy sometimes. This performer is so old, that he received his first magic lessons from Moses. He hails from places unknown- because quite honestly no one wants to claim him. Here he is"

"Our next performer is known in the magical community as "the Weatherman". Not because he predicts the weather, but that his magic routines are so long winded. This magician is truly gifted, unfortunately he has yet to open the wrapping paper. Without any further adieu "

"What can I say about our next performer tonight really what can I say? Just kidding of course, truth be known, this magician is a real spellbinder. Unfortunately his particular spell puts us all to sleep. Here he is, back from his critically acclaimed show "Trailer Park Magic", the incomprehensible..."

"It is said that some magicians have planted within them the seeds to great success. If that is true, our next performer is perhaps the seediest magician around. This conjuror has been compared to such notables as Houdini, Kellar, and Thurston. Not because of his skill, but because they are all dead. Ladies and Gentleman here he is"

"We are now in for a real treat. In all his years of performing, no one has been able to say one bad word about his magic. It usually takes several paragraphs. I wont say that he is a failure at mentalism, but he did receive an "F" on his last Book Test. Here he is, the mid-west master of magical mayhem"


*The Bunny Board- A comedy prop for Emcees and Magicians.

This was aimed at one time to appear in Genii, but was somehow lost in the process. Here it is in an electronic incarnation for your consideration.

The emcee, midway through the show suddenly loses his train of thought, and cannot remember the next act. He reaches for his trusty clip-board, whose shape looks a great deal like top hat.

Thinking outloud the emcee says, "lets see, we did this act... this one... this one... and... next page..." He flips the next page up, which is revealed to look like the proverbial rabbit from the hat. "Ah here it is!" he exclaims, and introduces the next act.

This shows the Bunny Board from the audience view.

http://waterloomagic.com/Bunnyboard2.JPG

To make a bunny board, trim a 1.25" x 9" off each side of a regular clipboard using a jigsaw. To even out the shape, trim a 1.5" section off the bottom as well.


Download the full-sized bunny art, found here-

http://waterloomagic.com/bunny.JPG

Print out the bunny art onto legal sized paper. If you do not have legal paper at home, reduce the image to 50% and take the graphic to a near-by Kinko's. Enlarge to 200% (or 141% twice) Re-retrace the solid lines with a bold marker if needed. Cut out just inside the dashed lines.

http://waterloomagic.com/Bunnyboard.JPG

This shows the configuration of the bunny art on the board. The ears are folded up to compress the production. You will also notice the "foot" of extra paper between the bunny and clip. This allows the graphic to clear the clip when extended. Some boards have lower profile clips, and will require less of a foot. Also note, if you double stick tape the bunny to the board just under the clip, you will be able to actually have notes under (and on top of) the bunny.

Well, I've taken up far too much bandwith.

Enjoy all!

Michael Sibbernsen

[ March 12, 2002: Message edited by: Michael Sibbernsen ]
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Postby Brad A._dup1 » 03/12/02 01:32 AM

I don't want to be mean... what about somewhat nice things to say?


-brad
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Postby M. Sibbernsen » 03/12/02 01:40 AM

The "Bag of Introductions" is all in good fun, and when done properly, everyone knows that.

If the "roasting" is not your bag (so to speak), you could certainly use the same bit, but with "nice" exaggerations.


Be sure to check out the "Bunny Board".
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Postby Charlie Chang » 03/12/02 02:05 AM

Hey Brad,
I think Michael's Bunny Board is a terrific idea and very funny if presented properly and the "bag of introductions" is worth a fortune to any emcee who knows how to use it properly.

Here's another bit I have used.

Come onto stage carrying your mic, which should be a cable mic, not wireless. Get about 1/3 of the way to centre stage before apparently running out of cable. Looking confused, begin pulling the cable out from the side of the stage, apparently with great difficulty. As you pull each lenght of cable (allowing you to move closer to the middle of the stage) you must appear to be pulling very hard. You must also be facing the audience as you do all this because....

As you you pull each length of cable, the curtain behind you moves up a little, then a little more, then a little more. Finally, you give a final pull and the cable suddenly loses tension and is back to normal. At this instant the curtain falls back down.

It is important that you never apparently see the curtain move and that this is done in the middle of the show, after you have established your character to the audience.

Needless to say, you need a couple of stage-hands to coordinate the curtain and to hold back the wire for you (dont really pull hard - just act). I think this works better for a dry performer like myself.

If you are working anywhere that has a proper stage with a curtain, this is a good bit.
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Postby M. Sibbernsen » 03/12/02 02:15 AM

Thanks RP, and I love your mic cable bit!

I could also see using that same idea, but to actually *open* the curtains behind you for the next performer. You would need a very long (perhaps faux) cable, but that would make the bit that much funnier.
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Postby Guest » 03/12/02 07:12 AM

How about "This act most certainly needs no introduction to our stage (pause)..." and then just walk off stage.

Or "This next act has been doing really well this last year and in fact have also taken up selling furniture on the side....Too bad it's their own."

or "We have searched the world in order to bring to you the finest in entertainment from around the world. Unfortunately all we could find was......"

and not to forget "The legend in his own mind....."

PSIncerely Yours,
Paul Alberstat
http://www.mindguy.com
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Postby Pete Biro » 03/12/02 08:48 AM

The next act needs no introduction, but he insists on one...

Here is the most important bit I ever found out--Mike Caldwell, who I considered the best taught me this when I asked him what to do when you forget the name (which I did a few times) of the next act...

He said find a gag that requires you to bring out a small piece of paper... do the gag... but you are really looking a the name of the next act written on it.

I have also written names on tape and put on floor or on mike stand or at the side of the stage (at the Castle this works) and just walk over to the side to do the intro...

It (for me) is really difficult to recall names right after you do your act...

:D :eek: :p
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Postby Pete Biro » 03/12/02 08:48 AM

Find Robert Orben's book "MC Bits" :eek: :eek:
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Postby Guest » 03/13/02 03:01 PM

Thanks for interesting bits of business. I love well thought out bits and pieces
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Postby Guest » 03/13/02 03:20 PM

Please can we have some more commercial material this thread is hot stuff
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Postby Guest » 03/13/02 09:03 PM

There's the old PA announcement..

"The management has asked me to make an announcement... can I get your attention... there's a car that needs to be moved... if your license plate is JBP325JTRF1CS7734, you need to move your car - your license plate is blocking the driveway..."

--Asrah
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Postby Guest » 03/15/02 07:42 PM

Here's a couple...

"This next performer is not only an outstanding magician, he is also one of my best friends. Ladies and Gentlemen Mr. Ben...uh....(pull out an index card)..oh, yeah...JOHNSON!"

This is a running gag: walk out wearing a wireless mic (hidden under your lapel)and a corded mic in your hand (not turned on). Give your intro. Next time you come out, you're carrying a drum stick as a mic. Next time a flashlight; each time you're amplified as if the funny object really is a mic.
The last time you come out you're carrying a carrot. You give part of your intro and then take a big bite out of the carrot. At the same time, your assistant shuts off the wireless mic. And you have to yell out the rest of the intro.

Ben S
When you come out with the
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