the new dean dill/mike weber "perfect world"

Discuss your favorite close-up tricks and methods.

Postby Guest » 01/25/05 02:20 AM

will this new routine be on general release or just through dean?

will it be practical for table to table work or is it a more formal piece?


hello mr robertson in glasgow!!
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Postby Pete Biro » 01/25/05 03:11 PM

I think it is already up on www.hocus-pocus.com

It was mass produced by Murphy's for Dean and Michael.

You can do it anywhere there is enough space to deal out the two rows of cards.

Re-Set is easy and quick.
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Postby Guest » 01/26/05 12:43 PM

Has anyone seen this effects? Any thoughts?
I saw it the other day at the Castle Dealer's day...
hmmmm....
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Postby Guest » 01/26/05 04:34 PM

I've seen Dean Dill blow away many great minds in magic with this. He performed it for one of my co-workers and now, Dean Dill is a legend to him.

Not only is the basic version easy and straight forward, but the booklet included with the special deck has all kinds of extra features and clever variations. It's Dean's hope that others will find new applications for the principal. And I'm sure exactly that will happen.

Read the description in hocus pocus... it's very detailed and accurate.

I bought mine this week! I'm digging it.
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Postby Guest » 01/26/05 08:55 PM

You can also buy it directly from Dean. Email him at:

intmiracle@deandill.com
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Postby Guest » 01/28/05 03:01 AM

I received my "A New World" from Dean Dill and Michael Weber.It is everything great that has been said about it and more. I have performed Curry's Out of This World for many years and it knocks the layman spectator for an absolute loop. This new version will not only amaze a normal spectator but it does not allow the magician to trace back the workings of the trick. At least I think it won't allow it. We perform for real people and this trick whether the spectator is a fireman, policeman, Indian Chief, or magican is going to become the way this trick is performed for many years to come. I am sure Paul Curry would approve of the magical handling of this effect. In addition to the A New World effect Dean and Michael provide several routines that enhance the original effect greatly and make it an even better trick than it was to start. Again this is MHO but I am ordering a second set so that I will never be without this very special trick. Do your self a favor and read the ads for it and when you buy it, you will find it is even beter than the ads. I don't think I have ever said that about an effect before. By the way other than being a fan of Deans magic ( I love Deans's Box)we have no connection what so ever.

Bob
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Postby Guest » 03/03/05 07:15 AM

Well I have recieved my "A New World" deck.
The manuscript that comes with it is great.
All the extra info on codes, markings and the aronson stack - great. The effect-perfect.
However as a friend pointed out recently,
The real beauty of the original OotW is the fact that it can be done FASDIU. With A New World you must cary an extra deck and switch out.
Of course you can perform myriad effects with the Dill/Webber pack and then really blow the people away with an incredible version of OotW. However if done with an effective presentation, for layman the original is just as astounding.
Now if you wanna fool 'da boys' you can't do much better than the Dill/Webber A New World.
A New World is everything the reviews say-incredible and well worth the price. I just think it is important to keep in mind the beauty of the original trick.

Peace,
Elliot
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Postby Guest » 03/03/05 07:48 AM

I'm going to take a different tact here on this one...and recomend it for study and use by those who go out and perform.

What you have is an option to do a few great card effects with a pack of cards. What you get is a kit all set to go and some routines with the work all ready to use. Seems a win/win to me. Anyone with questions about deck switching can easily find options from Paul Gertner and Juan Tamariz among others. Most who do perform are likely to have already learned how to switch decks in routine so they can get into and out of other items like the Devano Deck or Sam the Bellhop.

As to fooling magicians... sorry, not going to happen here, and a sad way of thinking to begin with. Any magician with even half a brain is going to deal the cards face up and bust you for using gaffs. The problem, like with the coin trick, is that when you are done, displaying a result, you are also in a vulnerable position where the props are on display yet not examinable. TADA indeed!
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Postby Guest » 03/03/05 08:58 AM

Originally posted by Jonathan Townsend:
I'm going to take a different tact here on this one...and recomend it for study and use by those who go out and perform.

What you have is an option to do a few great card effects with a pack of cards. What you get is a kit all set to go and some routines with the work all ready to use. Seems a win/win to me. Anyone with questions about deck switching can easily find options from Paul Gertner and Juan Tamariz among others. Most who do perform are likely to have already learned how to switch decks in routine so they can get into and out of other items like the Devano Deck or Sam the Bellhop.

As to fooling magicians... sorry, not going to happen here, and a sad way of thinking to begin with. Any magician with even half a brain is going to deal the cards face up and bust you for using gaffs. The problem, like with the coin trick, is that when you are done, displaying a result, you are also in a vulnerable position where the props are on display yet not examinable. TADA indeed!
I guess that all depends on your particular performance situation. I am in front of lay audiences twice daily six days a week (I am a tour guide in New Orleans and perform magic regularly for my groups.) My situation usually wont allow me to carry an extra deck (unless I use a hold out!) I think the trick is great and the deck and the thought that has gone into it remarkable-defiantly win/win. I agree with you whole heartedly that it is an excellent study in card magic. It just isnt an effect that I can't logistically see including in my current working repertoire. Also, I am a purist of sorts and like working from a shuffled deck in use. All that aside I am doing the trick for my friends and family and it sure kills. Big Fun for me!

Why is it a sad way of thinking to fool other magicians?
I really like it when I am fooled by a good magic trick. I know other guys who also like to be fooled. Maybe I am missing something. Just wondering.
As far as half-brained magicians, I try and follow instructions when some one is showing me an effect as I do not want it to go badly for the guy doing the trick and like I said I like to be fooled. So I guess if the presentation was done in such a way as to eliminate any wrong dealing it could be a good time for everyone involved. As with any performance audience management is the key to success.
Gently Stirring the Waters....
Peace,
Elliot
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Postby Guest » 03/03/05 09:06 AM

I think Mr. Swain laid down the definitive law on this subject. When performing for 'laymen' you must be willing to hand out the cards for inspection. No 'ifs', 'ands' or 'buts' allowed.

I have performed Galaxy hundreds of times and the audience does examine the cards at the end of the effect. I would never perform this effect with a gaffed deck. However I can see it fooling magicians as they rarely ask to see the cards.

My experience in this area validates Mr. Swains comments on the matter.

Sincerely,

Randy
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Postby Guest » 03/03/05 09:52 AM

Originally posted by nola:
...I am a purist of sorts and like working from a shuffled deck in use. All that aside I am doing the trick for my friends and family and it sure kills. Big Fun for me!

Why is it a sad way of thinking to fool other magicians?
I really like it when I am fooled by a good magic trick. I know other guys who also like to be fooled. Maybe I am missing something. Just wondering...
Your performing logistics are yours, and you know best what works for you. Most folks who do tricks like the Devano rising cards are used to ringing in and out a gaffed deck as needed. My comment was addressed to that group. Of course your choices are yours and I wish you the best with your choices.

The half witted magicians and fooling magicians focus is where we are not looking at the same issues. When you have the cards laid out, it is NATURAL to take a moment to look at the evidence, and even more natural to be attentive to any sudden shifts in the performer should they attempt to sweep away evidence. Just human nature there that we conjurers sometimes don't acknowledge. There are many times a "helpful" volunteer may want to spread the cards or pick up the coins,* helpful as in well intended.

The shift or emphasis on fooling magicians is what I see as sad. If a routine works well for laymen, the odds are it can work just fine for magicians. Really. When we get convoluted thinking and odd procedures intended to "prove" things ... we get cluttered and off balance routines that lose their magic and become mere puzzles. I prefer magic.
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Postby Guest » 03/03/05 11:52 AM

Originally posted by Jonathan Townsend:
Originally posted by nola:
[b]...I am a purist of sorts and like working from a shuffled deck in use. All that aside I am doing the trick for my friends and family and it sure kills. Big Fun for me!

Why is it a sad way of thinking to fool other magicians?
I really like it when I am fooled by a good magic trick. I know other guys who also like to be fooled. Maybe I am missing something. Just wondering...
Your performing logistics are yours, and you know best what works for you. Most folks who do tricks like the Devano rising cards are used to ringing in and out a gaffed deck as needed. My comment was addressed to that group. Of course your choices are yours and I wish you the best with your choices.

The half witted magicians and fooling magicians focus is where we are not looking at the same issues. When you have the cards laid out, it is NATURAL to take a moment to look at the evidence, and even more natural to be attentive to any sudden shifts in the performer should they attempt to sweep away evidence. Just human nature there that we conjurers sometimes don't acknowledge. There are many times a "helpful" volunteer may want to spread the cards or pick up the coins,* helpful as in well intended.

The shift or emphasis on fooling magicians is what I see as sad. If a routine works well for laymen, the odds are it can work just fine for magicians. Really. When we get convoluted thinking and odd procedures intended to "prove" things ... we get cluttered and off balance routines that lose their magic and become mere puzzles. I prefer magic. [/b]
I never really thought about it that way. The fact is I would rather watch a magician do a tried and true classic that has been perfected than some confusing jumble of proofs. Good point sir.

You are also right with regard to "helpful" spectators. It is fun though to take the risk. Those moments when you're hanging out there in limbo wondering if the guy across the close up mat is gonna pick up the gaff...Whew! I like the rush!

Peace,
Elliot :)
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Postby Guest » 04/27/05 09:10 PM

so, what exactely happens? you lay out two indicator cards, they deal, and then two totally seperated piles? what about shuffling?
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Postby Guest » 04/30/05 11:59 PM

Hi discjockey,

In "New World" there are many routines that dove tail into one another, but the climax is a very clean color separation. You simply give the spectator half the cards (so it goes fast). The spectator can shuffle the cards (without looking at the faces) and there are certain shuffles that are not allowed. At this point the spectator deals down 2 piles on the top of the indicator cards. When he's done, the magician (notice I said magician) turns over the two piles to show that the spectator has PERFECTLY separated the Red cards from the Black ones. At this point the magician must use some audience control, so that the spectators don't grab for the cards. If they do, the gimmick will be exposed and the trick will be ruined.

When it comes to color separation, "New World" is as clean as it gets. It's the closest thing to real magic. Obviously the "Achilles' Heal" of this trick is the cards are gaffed. If you are a magician that is familiar with the method you would figure it out without seeing the gaffs (just because it's the ONLY logical alternative). And obviously, because of the gaffed nature you do have to carry another deck of cards with you.

All the best,
Greg Rostami
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Postby Pete Biro » 05/01/05 11:04 AM

Rather then worry about a deck switch... do as one of the most successful close up workers in history did...

Do a card trick with a gaffed deck.

Put it away.

Do a coin trick.

Bring out the deck (different gaffed deck) and do another miracle.

Repeat

Repeat

Why work hard?

Oh, the performer?

Don Alan

And Goshman did the same.
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