Backwards Magic

Discuss your favorite close-up tricks and methods.

Postby Adam Brooks » 12/24/01 07:38 PM

An observation for your consideration: Has anyone here noticed that a number of card moves that we use are performed backwards?

What the heck does that mean? Consider the Kosky Switch. When the cards are in 'display position' after the first half of the mechanics are done, only the top card is truly visible to the spectator, the other two are upside down. We are, in fact, doing the switch for ourselves, and not for our audience! I can't help but think of how many other moves or displays actually only display the cards properly (i.e. right-side up) to the magician and not the audience.

Thoughts? Comments?

Adam
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Postby Bill Duncan » 12/24/01 08:00 PM

I've often wondered why, in a culture that reads from left to right, that so many "Coins Across" routines have the coins travel backwards (from the spectator's viewpoint) into the right hand rather than the other way.
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Postby Bill Duncan » 12/24/01 08:06 PM

I've often wondered why, in a culture that reads from left to right, that so many "Coins Across" routines have the coins travel backwards (from the spectator's viewpoint) into the right hand rather than the other way.
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Postby Guest » 01/10/02 12:14 PM

Originally posted by Bill Duncan:
I've often wondered why, in a culture that reads from left to right, that so many "Coins Across" routines have the coins travel backwards (from the spectator's viewpoint) into the right hand rather than the other way.


Because most people are right handed, and most people have better sleight of hand skill with their dominant hand, the palming or back clipping or whatever sleight method is being used is typically in hand the coin is flying to. (The hand that needs the ability to hold out).
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Postby Guest » 01/10/02 02:39 PM

Momentary tangent...

Even a lot of left-handed people have superior dexterity in their right hands for many activities. I'm one such lefty. Back-palming, edge-palming, coin-rolling, and the like come far more naturally in my right than my left hand. And the version of coins across I perform indeed goes from my left hand to my right.
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Postby Guest » 01/10/02 06:28 PM

I'm right handed. Very much so. My Charlier one-handed cut belongs to my left hand. In my right hand, it's cards on the floor. I'll bet most righties are the same way. Go figure.
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Postby Andi » 01/11/02 09:19 AM

The idea of working left to right from the audience point of view has been used for years by actors when entering and exiting the stage and it's something I try to do when performing formally. Although it can be considered to be such as small point, it does make watching the performer that little bit easier.

So far, the responses have been about making things easier for the magician - I'd rather spend that little bit extra practice time to perform the 'reverse' moves with both hands so that when the need arises, I'm ready to perform in the clearest manner. However, I think it is extremely important to create a flow... so instead of just learning one offending move in the opposite direction, learn them all as it is even worse for the spectator's to keep changing the way they need to watch you.

This also extends much further than moves. Even the way we display cards should be studied closely as it's extremely easy to break this flow.

--Andi
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Postby Guest » 01/11/02 11:30 AM

Andi, your point is taken, but I personally think it is a waste of time to retrain and relearn routines that take advantage of your "strong" hand just so coins can fly the opposite direction (or whatever the routine is).

While there should be some ability to do sleight of hand with both hands, it is a minority of people who can actually perform equally well with both hands.

When I structure routines, I structure them in a way that use the strengths of my ability. I think forcing myself another way simply because of a right left or left right direction is much more trouble than it's gained worth.

Dan
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Postby Sean Piper » 01/11/02 04:33 PM

Not entirely relevant to the topic at hand but....

A while back I heard about Chuck Fayne's ability to write perfectly legible handwriting, upside down and right way up, with both his left and right hand.

I'm told it's something he doesn't show off as a skill, rather it's just an exercise for evening up the ability between his hands.
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Postby Guest » 01/12/02 02:43 AM

Or.. how about J.C. Doty's ability to sign his name in "mirror reverse"? :cool:
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Postby Andi » 01/12/02 07:25 AM

Dan...

Setting out to work on every move you do with the other hand would be a waste of time. However, I love to play so most of the time it takes only a little extra effort to get both hands doing the work as it's likely I played around with a similar thing when I first learnt the move.

Also, it's not just about changing hands - something as simple as a top change and the direction you move your hands before, during and afterwards can make all the difference.

--Andi
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