Berglas Effect on DVD

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DerBrave007
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Joined: March 12th, 2012, 4:47 am

Berglas Effect on DVD

Postby DerBrave007 » March 12th, 2012, 4:51 am

I see many Books and Videos that contain a ACAAN Trick (Berglas Effect),what is the most impossible Routine,without Stacked Deck or Memorizing ? Are there a good Routine on DVD that I can buy ?

Anod
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Joined: December 31st, 2011, 6:27 am

Re: Berglas Effect on DVD

Postby Anod » March 12th, 2012, 7:52 am

I recommend the Max Krause:macaan version,very simple and easy.Something help to you to calculate during the trick,dont need memorize.Max is correct and helpful person.


Peter

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Richard Kaufman
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Re: Berglas Effect on DVD

Postby Richard Kaufman » March 12th, 2012, 11:53 am

There are versions in the my Berglas book that do not require a stacked deck or memorization. But you need BALLS to do them. If you don't have balls (or whatever the equivalent is for our female brethern) then you shouldn't be a magician in the first place.

That said, you might purchase Marc Paul's "Affected by Berglas." It is the best version of the effect other than the original.
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Ian Kendall
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Re: Berglas Effect on DVD

Postby Ian Kendall » March 12th, 2012, 4:19 pm

You get ten points just for 'female brethren'...

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Richard Kaufman
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Re: Berglas Effect on DVD

Postby Richard Kaufman » March 12th, 2012, 6:57 pm

The Oxford English Dictionary says:

What is the female equivalent of brethren?

There is a word: sistren.

Both brethren and sistren were used in Middle English (12th to 15th centuries) simply as the plural forms of brother and sister. From about 1600, brothers began to take over from brethren (Shakespeare used both), except when referring to fellow members of a religious community, or a society or profession. It still has this meaning today, and you may also find it used in ironic or humorous contexts (e.g. our brethren in the popular national press).

Sistren, on the other hand, had fallen completely out of use by the middle of the 16th century. It has recently been revived, typically by feminist writers, with the new meaning 'fellow women' (e.g. Lead singer Beth starts out most shows with several shout-outs to her sistren). This use is not yet well established in standard English.
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