Name this paragraph

Discuss general aspects of Genii.
billmccloskey
Posts: 164
Joined: June 10th, 2011, 2:11 pm

Name this paragraph

Postby billmccloskey » July 15th, 2011, 7:48 pm

I'm reading this and have to share.

2 points if you know the source ( try not and reveal the source too quickly for those that know. Maybe a "I know." rather than a reveal.)

10 points if you can fathom what it means and why it was written the way it was. All can participate here:

"You are flirting with disaster if you take one second longer for your routine than you would be allowed under top promagnetic personality is sufficiently strong to interest an audience for long periods of time. That's the way YOU think. That's the fessional direction. Of course, I know that you are certain your way everybody thinks. But it isn't the way an audience thinks. "

Bill McFadden
Posts: 621
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Villesville-on-the-Chesapeake

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby Bill McFadden » July 15th, 2011, 9:14 pm

Joel Bauer?

billmccloskey
Posts: 164
Joined: June 10th, 2011, 2:11 pm

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby billmccloskey » July 16th, 2011, 1:14 am

I guess I'll have to give a hint. This was written by a former writer for Genii.

User avatar
Chas Nigh
Posts: 157
Joined: March 24th, 2008, 10:45 pm
Location: California

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby Chas Nigh » July 16th, 2011, 3:06 am

Darriel Fitzkee?

billmccloskey
Posts: 164
Joined: June 10th, 2011, 2:11 pm

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby billmccloskey » July 16th, 2011, 7:17 am

We have a winner. Yes the author is Dariel Fitzkee from Showmanship for Magicians. 4th edition. I'm assuming this paragraph made it through 3 other editions in tact.

I read that paragraph over and over and over trying to pry some sense out of it. Actually Showmanship has a lot of such paragraphs that refuse to parse no matter how much you look at them.

At first you think the typesetter messed up. But then you are brought up short with a line like: "Of course, I know that you are certain your way everybody thinks." which is such a strange way of saying that line.

El Mystico
Posts: 958
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Leamington Spa
Contact:

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby El Mystico » July 16th, 2011, 8:30 am

"You are flirting with disaster if you take one second longer for your routine than you would be allowed under top professional direction. Of course, I know that you are certain your magnetic personality is sufficiently strong to interest an audience for long periods of time. That's the way YOU think. That's the way everybody thinks. But it isn't the way an audience thinks."

It's just a couple of bits the wrong way round. But, yes, interesting that it went through three editions wrong.

Mind you, I've got a copy of Mervyn Peake's fabulous "Letters to a Lost Uncle", which has been professionally published a number of times, and one page is in the wrong place, and, I think, has been ever since first publication.

billmccloskey
Posts: 164
Joined: June 10th, 2011, 2:11 pm

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby billmccloskey » July 16th, 2011, 8:51 am

Thanks for re-arranging Mystico: did you do that yourself or was it fixed in another edition?

El Mystico
Posts: 958
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Leamington Spa
Contact:

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby El Mystico » July 16th, 2011, 10:12 am

It was all my own work.

Jonathan Townsend
Posts: 7396
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Westchester, NY
Contact:

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby Jonathan Townsend » July 16th, 2011, 12:44 pm

My grandmother was a proofreader and such things just get out my pen/pencil when I come across them. When reading that book I filtered out the "you" stuff and left the notion "don't linger in our economy of attention". If you are an active reader with an eye on grammar, tone, presuppositions and such you can have quite the time of it in many magicshop texts.

As advised by one of the NY coin guys (whose minion informs me that they don't wish to be named in my posts) and in consonance with John Ramsay's advice on seeing other magicians perform: it's useful to explore the opinions of others in context as their reports of success can guide, their reports of failures can warn and their unfounded assertions may point to areas of profitable exploration.

Pete McCabe
Posts: 2170
Joined: January 18th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Simi Valley, CA

Re: Name this paragraph

Postby Pete McCabe » July 16th, 2011, 2:09 pm

It reads like the kind of thing that was in a PDF in two columns and was copied across columns and then pasted into the body. My point is that Fitzkee was way ahead of his time working with PDFs long before they were invented.


Return to “General”