Leaving a table

Discuss your favorite close-up tricks and methods.

Postby Guest » 03/10/04 11:35 AM

When performing table magic, how do you leave the table?

Personally, here's how I do it.

I finish with a killer effect that leaves them reeling. If my standard killer effect doesn't kill, I may try another that leaves them shaking their heads.

Then I say: "I'm here every Saturday night. So come on back."

And then I back off a couple steps, smiling, then turn and leave.

Sometimes, I catch the diners a bit off guard, and they may not know how to tip me. They may not know the Emily Post of the situation. But I do feel that making an economic exit rather than lingering is the best route. It saves uncomfortable feelings on everyone's part.
Guest
 

Postby Pete Biro » 03/10/04 06:44 PM

Why not leave something behind then come back for it... then they tip?

Or DO NOT WORK FOR TIPS... give them a bill and a prestamped envelope.
Stay tooned.
User avatar
Pete Biro
 
Posts: 7124
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Hollyweird

Postby Guest » 03/12/04 10:45 AM

Originally posted by Pete Biro:
Why not leave something behind then come back for it... then they tip?
Hey, I've been doing that, albeit accidentally.

I've been performing The Corner in the Glass, Eugene Berger's version of Ed Shulien's trick. And often, I accidentally leave the Pilsener glass behind on the table. When I come back, I often find that there's a gift in it for me. Sometimes, people even put it in the glass while I'm at the table.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 03/12/04 11:25 AM

Here, try this. "Thank you for coming to xxx tonight, we hope to see you again, enjoy your evening".

As for the tip thing. Is there anyone left that works in a place that sales something that can be consumed that DOESN'T think they deserve to be tipped? Pour a cup of coffee at a counter, they want a tip, hand you a can, they want a tip, not do a thing and they want a tip. I always thought the word meant To Insure Prompt Service and that would mean a wait person who comes to your table and his side kicks earn tips for the service they provide. I think a magician working for tips offends guest. They shouldn't be expected to reach for their wallet until they are ready to pay and leave. Going into a restaurant should not be like walking down Telegraph in Berkeley where everyone has their freakin' hand out.
Steve V
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 03/13/04 10:37 AM

Originally posted by Steve V':
...As for the tip thing. Is there anyone left that works in a place that sales something that can be consumed that DOESN'T think they deserve to be tipped? Pour a cup of coffee at a counter, they want a tip, hand you a can, they want a tip, not do a thing and they want a tip....
My focus was not on the appropriateness of soliciting a tip. I'm interested simply in the protocol of leaving a table.
Guest
 

Postby Steve V » 03/13/04 12:12 PM

Like I said, try something like "thank you, have a nice evening". Works. You can, of course, prior to your exiting statement ask them to tell the hostess if they enjoyed the magic while leaving but other than that a thank you pretty much covers things.
Steve V
Steve V
Steve V
 
Posts: 642
Joined: 01/20/08 01:00 PM
Location: Silver Springs, NV

Postby Dave Shepherd » 03/14/04 05:05 AM

In addition to what was just suggested, I always like to say my name one last time, so I'm not just "that magician guy."

In addition to my regular gig, where I am almost always the one there, I am also on a couple fill-in lists for other magicians' restaurant gigs, meaning that I am not the only performer working at those places from week to week. I want people to have at least a marginal chance of remembering who I am.
Dave Shepherd
 
Posts: 423
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: 15 miles w. of Washington, DC

Postby Guest » 03/14/04 11:34 AM

Originally posted by Dave Shepherd:
...I am also on a couple fill-in lists for other magicians' restaurant gigs, meaning that I am not the only performer working at those places from week to week. I want people to have at least a marginal chance of remembering who I am....
Personally, when I fill in, I don't like to encroach on another magician's territory. Even if I'm better (and I sometimes am), I find it embarrassing when I book a show from a friend's restaurant gig. I don't really want to be remembered by name at a friend's restaurant gig.
Guest
 

Postby Dave Shepherd » 03/14/04 02:09 PM

Originally posted by David Groves:
Personally, when I fill in, I don't like to encroach on another magician's territory. Even if I'm better (and I sometimes am), I find it embarrassing when I book a show from a friend's restaurant gig. I don't really want to be remembered by name at a friend's restaurant gig.
Understood. These gigs of which I speak are situations in which the "magician of record" has a rotating group of performers who cover the gig sometimes for several weeks running. They're mostly descendants of Alain Nu's restaurant gigs around Washington, and we "filler-inners" tend to be more of a rotating magic staff. The regulars in these gigs are sometimes on the road for a month or two at a time.

I very occasionally have to get somebody to fill in my gig, but that's a much more occasional thing than these "staff rotation" things. Personally, I don't mind my audience remembering Karen Berris or Eric Henning or Alain Nu as subs for me at my restaurant.

But I do understand what you're saying, David, and I think that's an admirable approach.
Dave Shepherd
 
Posts: 423
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: 15 miles w. of Washington, DC


Return to Close-Up Magic