The Revolution or air-pressure turnover

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Postby Philippe Noël » 03/09/11 07:51 AM

In the book "Annotated Erdnase" which I like very much, Darwin Ortiz says P.192 that :"The Sachs'book marked the first publication of the now standard "revolution" or air-pressure turnover".
The problem is that Sachs' Sleight of Hand was published in 1877 and the sleight was already described in Hoffmann's Modern Magic published in 1876 P.45 as the Third Method for disclosing a discovered card.
The question is then:
When was first published this sleight?
Was it in Modern Magic?
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Postby Richard Kaufman » 03/09/11 11:26 AM

Both books were published earlier in serial form, so you would need to learn those original dates of publication.
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Postby Joe Pecore » 03/09/11 04:19 PM

AskAlexander says "Sleight of Hand appeared serially in 'Exchange and Mart' at the same time that Professor Hoffmann's Modern Magic was being published elsewhere"' (Stayon's Magic, June 1901)
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Postby Jonathan Townsend » 03/09/11 04:52 PM

Do either of them cite sources?
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Postby Edwin Corrie » 03/09/11 05:11 PM

This has come up before, and it seems Bart Whaley traced it back to "The Boy's Own Book" by William Clarke (1829):

http://www.geniimagazine.com/forums/ubb ... ber=107974

See The Turn-over on page 396 here:

http://books.google.com/books?id=XiMOAA ... &q&f=false

This is the 4th edition, but the same trick is also in my 1996 reprint of what seems to be the original edition of 1829.

In the thread mentioned above Philippe Billot refers to a precedent in "Le Testament de Jrme Sharp" (1793), which has a trick where you control four selections to the top and basically do the air pressure turnover four times. The difference is you don't drop the pack - you jog the card over with the thumb and swipe your hand down so that the card flies off and lands face up on the table. It's more surefire than the method where you drop the pack, which I personally could never get to work consistently. See here (page 105; the trick starts on page 102):

http://books.google.com/books?id=tEROAA ... &q&f=false

Edit: Sorry about the links - can anyone fix them?
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Postby Joe Pecore » 03/09/11 05:17 PM

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Postby Brad Henderson » 03/09/11 05:30 PM

I have spoken with a couple of magicians about this, and they shared that they could never get this move to work reliably. I can't either.

Also, I once read a variant where a deck is tossed along a bar and as it came to rest in a spread the top card flipped over. While this sounds like the job of an acrobatic type card, the method given was the air pressure.

Any idea where this variant appeared?
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Postby Jeff Haas » 03/09/11 06:06 PM

Martin Nash had a tweak to the move in one of his books that improved its reliability somewhat. Can't remember where that is right now.
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Postby Edwin Corrie » 03/09/11 06:22 PM

Jeff Haas wrote:Martin Nash had a tweak to the move in one of his books that improved its reliability somewhat. Can't remember where that is right now.


No-Air-Pressure Turnover in "Ever So Sleightly".

Also, the Boy's Own Book was translated into French as "Manuel des jeunes gens" (1831) - see page 171 of Vol. 2:
http://books.google.fr/books?id=sJ4CAAA ... &q&f=false

(Thanks Joe - I think I see how to do the links now.)

For the reliability, see here:
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/view ... 66&forum=2
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Postby Philippe Noël » 03/10/11 05:42 AM

Thank you guys for your help.
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Postby El Mystico » 03/11/11 11:27 AM

Brad; have you tried Lorayne's Quinella? I can't begin to explain why, but dropping just half the pack seems to make the whole thing more certain.
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Postby magicfish » 01/25/13 12:00 AM

My thoughts exactly. Harry Lorayne's thoughts on this revelation in Quinella make it the best description I've encountered.
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