Houdinize, Chase, coined, Funk & Wagnall's ...

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Postby Stepanov » 12/03/09 08:44 PM

I saw 10-15 books and everywhere was same "Houdinize, Chase, coined, Funk & Wagnall's" Looks like all repeat from another and nobody understand what they write...

What means "coined" on this contest? How Chase coined word? Did he goes to smithy, take big hammer and made metal coin with name "Houdinize"? Or he work on Funk & Wagnall's and secretly from chief type article Houdinize? Or he graft somebody inside Funk & Wagnall's company?

Apologize if only for me this word not open subject complete.
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Postby Jonathan Townsend » 12/04/09 02:09 PM

translated vagaries -> almost amusing word salad.

Specifics?

Citations?

URLs for items referenced?
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Postby houdini's ghost » 12/04/09 06:02 PM

The editor of Funk and Wagnalls dictionary when Houdini's name was added was Frank H. Vizetelly.
This is what he wrote about Houdini when he died:
The Late Harry Houdini
To the editor of the New York Times:
Harry Houdini does not need any panegyric from me, but as one who has enjoyed his friendship for more than 15 years, may I be permitted to echo the sentiments expressed about him in the Times editorial on Monday last?
Further, let me add, please, that to me he was one of the most lovable men I have known, and the first thoughts that sprang to my mind when I read of his death were the words of that in mortal poem of Leigh Hunt's, "Abou-ben-Adhem"--
"I pray thee, then,
Write me as one that loves his fellow-men," for if ever there was a man who loved his fellow it was Harry Houdini. Great-hearted and distinguished by the sweetness of his disposition, he was generous to a fault; gave of himself freely to every worthy cause; hated all false pretense and deceit. Here was a man who went about doing good, interesting himself in everything that was noble and kind, and ready to help where ever there was need. By his passing the world lost a great and good man, and I a loyal and staunch friend. God has placed another star in his heaven.
Frank H. Vizetelly
New York, November 1, 1926
Clearly, Mr. Vizetelly was a fan. And, on Nov 1, 1926, a bereaved friend.
However, Houdini's name Had to added to the dictionary and the proof is that it is in such common use today. I can't think of a name that is so often used as a metaphor.
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Postby Kevin Connolly » 12/04/09 08:39 PM

I think Houdini's name was added in 1918 and Vizetelly was editor than. Glady's gave Houdini a copy for a Christmas present in that year.
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Postby Stepanov » 12/06/09 03:48 AM

Apologize for not clear question.

--------------
Houdini on magic.
Harry Houdini, Walter Brown Gibson, Morris N. Young.
Page ix

...Arthur B. [color:#FF0000]Chase[/color], [color:#FF0000]coined[/color] the verb "[color:#FF0000]houdinize[/color]" for the 1920 edition of [color:#FF0000]Funk & Wagnall's[/color] standard dictionary...
------------------------

Strategic denial and deception: the twenty-first century challenge.
Roy Godson,James J. Wirtz
Page 203

An amuzing example of a coined trap-word is [color:#FF0000]houdinize[/color]. It first appeared in the 1920 edition of [color:#FF0000]Funk & Wagnall's [/color]New Standard Dictionary ... The real story is that the word was [color:#FF0000]coined[/color] by Harry Houdini's able press agent, Arthur B. [color:#FF0000]Chase[/color], specifically for use by F&W's lexicographers.
----------------

THE ENCYCLOPEDIC DICTIONARY OF MAGIC
Bart Whaley

Houdini, who knew Mrs. Mabel Wagnalls-Jones, had been pressing her to get his name in her company's dictionary as early as 24 Jul 1916. For this purpose, Houdini's able press agent, Arthur B. [color:#FF0000]Chase[/color], [color:#FF0000]coined[/color] the word "[color:#FF0000]houdinize[/color]" and planted it on the [color:#FF0000]Funk & Wagnalls's [/color]lexicographers who entered it in their 1920 edition and retained it through their 1963 edition (last revised in 1959).
---------------

What means "coined"?
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Postby Kevin Connolly » 12/06/09 10:00 AM

To me, "coined", means the first use of a word. It usually the inventor of the new word. You usually see it used in obituaries the most often.
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Postby Jonathan Townsend » 12/06/09 01:51 PM

Putting words in the dictionary just because.... kinda cute and might make a fun project for mentalists or bizarrists here - though it is kind of Tlonist in some dark ways.

Getting back to the facts - a thing is what it does so ...
Houdinize- to take the name of a well respected artist and stick on an "ini" and then go and write an book exposing that namesake as a fraud.

or do we mean what Robert-Houdin did using the magnetic light-heavy chest to the Arabs. ie Houdinize - to impose one's cultural will using trickery to destroy the faith based foundations of others?

There are other candidate definitions - the one involving apron-strings is funny while the modern urban dictionary one involving giving ones partner a surprise... not so funny.
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Postby houdini's ghost » 12/06/09 02:06 PM

Did anybody EVER use the word Houdinize? If anyone was going to use it I would think it would be me.
I couldn't say it.
The name Houdini made the same edition as I remember--I saw the actual edition about 50 years ago. The use of that "word"--name--Houdini--just doesn't end. I heard the word "pixilated" as in "wee bit pixilated" from Harvey has been dropped from the dictionary. Say, I hope they didn't drop pixilated and keep Houdinize. In my crowd, we say one is just "a wee bit pixilated" a lot and, again, I never hear anyone say Houdinize--not even me.
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Postby Bill Mullins » 12/06/09 07:39 PM

A "trap word" is a word in a dictionary whose purpose is to identify those who plagiarize that dictionary -- to trap them. It may be a made up word or a word which is used so seldomly as to not otherwise merit inclusion in the dictionary. If the word is seen in another dictionary, it is proof that plagiarism has occurred, because normal lexicographical processes wouldn't generate an entry for the word.

Obviously, many people have used the word "Houdinize". It's been used several times on this thread alone. Google gives 672 hits for it. But they all seem to be meta-discussions of the word, commenting on the fact that it is a word, or appears in the FW dictionary, etc.
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Postby Jonathan Townsend » 12/06/09 08:46 PM

Any words from Klingon on the OED yet?

-That was interesting about a seed or trap word in the dictionary to catch copyists. I heard there are similar streets (or missing streets) on maps.
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Postby Stepanov » 12/07/09 02:44 AM

Kevin Connolly wrote:To me, "coined", means the first use of a word. It usually the inventor of the new word. You usually see it used in obituaries the most often.

Dear Mr. Connolly.
Not "To me...". I have my "to me..." before I began this thread. I need sources!!! I read 15-20 books and nothing more than same four words find inside. I search ONLY ONE book where will be written "He coined word by next things. He did ..." and explanation what personally he did to coined that word. I hope you realize I understand different meanings of word "coined". Looks like he wrote some of articles with this word, but WHAT WAS THAT ARTICLES? Or he did not wrote articles but began during conversations use this word with "Ops. You do not know this word? Come on, this is popular word and it means..." If so - what source where written that he did that?

To me strange existing so many books with this subject and nobody interesting what it means personally...
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Postby Jonathan Townsend » 12/07/09 08:07 AM

Stepanov wrote:...and nobody interesting what it means personally...


Per "Carter Beats the Devil" you suspect it's a red tie revelation?
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Postby Kevin Connolly » 12/07/09 09:48 AM

Stepanov,

You may want to start here.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neologism

Or do a search with "coined" for more input.

I hope you got you enjoyed your Fechner set.

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Postby El Mystico » 12/07/09 11:50 AM

Oleg's English isn't great (but it is a lot better than my Russian!) but I think it is clear that he is not looking for a definition of "coined" - he is looking to understand how Chase established the word 'Houdinize' to get it recognised in Funk and Wagnell. For instance, did he get the word used in articles, and then showed those articles to the editor? And if so, where are those articles?

Hi Oleg - I can't help with the answer, but maybe I've helped with the question!
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Postby Kevin Connolly » 12/07/09 12:12 PM

Ok, then most of the answer is above. Houdini was in F&W by 1918. New words are added every year to the dictionary. There are coined phrases added into our language too. One of the popular ones today is "thrown under the bus".

With Houdini in the F&W already, the article above on neologism should connect the dots(coined phrase :)) and lead you to Houdinize.

We won't even get into Houdini-like. :)

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Postby El Mystico » 12/07/09 12:15 PM

On Oleg's behalf I thank you, Kevin.

Can anyone else shed any light on how Chase got the word into the dictionary?
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Postby Stepanov » 12/08/09 04:26 AM

Dear Mr. El Mystico. Looks like you absolutely correct. When I watch your words I suppose it is equal what I wrote, but I do not understand why another peoples do not understand my texts like yours... :-))) I hope your last visit to my country help you understand peoples like me. :-)

Please to all. Any light on how Chase got the word into the dictionary?
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