"Heavy Hitters"

Discuss general aspects of Genii.

Postby Guest » 03/01/03 09:41 PM

I have been involved with magic for 11 years. I am just now starting to learn about the significant magicians in the past. For the past 9 years it has all been about the "tricks". Now my pursuit is studying the art. I want to thank the Genii staff or whoever decides on your magazine topics. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading about Al Baker, Ross Bertram, Robert-Houdin(book review). Learning about these men are helping me to see my craft in a greater depth. Al Baker..."We must never forget that the details of presentation are what make a trick. And STUDY and THOUGHT brings us those details. As I type this I hear Stephen Covey's voice "think my friend...think hard!".
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Postby Guest » 03/01/03 10:15 PM

Howdy. Stephen Covey scared me at first. Just wanted to let you know I'm sorry if anyone confuses you for me due to our names being so close. So if you get any ranting emails calling you bad names just forward to me, thank you.
Steve V <---the V stands for Vaughn
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Postby Jeff Eline » 03/02/03 07:21 AM

I have to second that thought. I've been involved with magic, on and off, for years. But it's only been recently that I've focused on all the great material of the past. Between the feature articles in Genii, the book discussions as well as the general discussions throughout this board, I've learned much about stuff I should have known about.

And now with John Carney's new book, it only makes the point once again. His recommened book list at the beginning only made me depressed (and my wife scared!)
Jeff Eline
 
Posts: 647
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Baltimore, MD

Postby Guest » 03/02/03 05:11 PM

Ross Bertram has to be number one on my list for all sorts of reasons
Which Is wHy I am very pleased that it's March and that the new edition is in our world!

One gets a sense from studying these guys that you can really make a piece of magic out of anything...Anything at all if you set your heart to it.....With the may hundereds of expensive products on the market these days one should meditate on that.

DeanX
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Postby Guest » 03/03/03 07:23 AM

Dean!!! That is the KEY! Doing magic with anything. Isn't that what real magic should be. Taking an "object" and breathing YOUR life into it. O.K. maybe I'm sounding to ethereal. But, I have been learning and have realized LOUD and CLEAR, it's not about the new gadgetery. There is a plethora of new videos,books,gimmicks,etc. To many to keep up with. Why not concentrate on the "object" PEOPLE!!!! Thats who you are trying to influence anyway right. Why not study on "people" and the underlying priciples that hold up our craft! I remember reading in Bert Allerton's book that "he read EVERYTHING of MAJOR importance in the literature of magic".
...speaking of major importance, I am glad Jeff mentioned Mr. Carney's new book. I read the review in Genii by Mr. Swiss. WOW!!! I read the review several times!! I TOOK NOTES!! That is definetly a book on my list to get. Jeff, could you give us one particular thing that stood out in your mind about the book?
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Postby Jeff Eline » 03/03/03 08:37 AM

Originally posted by Steve Vaught:
[QB Jeff, could you give us one particular thing that stood out in your mind about the book?[/QB]
Steve,

Unfortunately, I just received the book the other day, so I'm still working my way through it. Mr. Carney obviously pays homage to the 'heavy hitters' with brief bios on Vernon, Leipzig, Kolta, Hofzinser etc... And the routines he's selected are based on classics with his take on them. The attention to detail within the explanations, from hand/finger position to pauses before a double lift get-ready, is incredible.

Here's the one thing that has struck me so far: I love the questions at the end of each chapter. I will say that I'm an amateur (read:serious student), and maybe this stuff is blatantly obvious to the working professional, but it seems as if this book not only gives you routines and moves, but also jumping off points for your own creativity. For example:

How would this routine change if you included another simple prop like a wand or a coin purse? What new possibilites would it present?

What else could be used instead of paper? A rose petal? A broken egg shell?

What do you gain or lose, help or hinder, by using a different type of glass, or by adding a handkerchief or a wand?


I'm still in my first of what I'm sure will be several passes through this book.
Jeff Eline
 
Posts: 647
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Baltimore, MD

Postby Guest » 03/03/03 04:32 PM

Jeff
Don't worry about being an amateur...Most of our members are amateurs and proud of it Money has nothing whatsoever to do with the persuit of art or sleight of hand magic....Magic is one performing art that many people excel in without ever really doing a paid gig.

It can sometimes be the amateurs that offer the best advice rather than the pros's......not always though.

Rock on

DeanX
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