The History of the Two Card Transposition

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Postby Mysterious Kid » 07/14/08 03:55 PM

Hello,
I'm looking for the original credits of the classical two card transposition.

Effect:
Card is selected, returnd and controlled to the top, mostly with the LePaul Bluff Pass.The first effect is that the card jumps up. Than the spectator is asked to hold her hand up and the card is placed ontop.Than comes the line:"Put your other hand ontop of if in a Sandwich manner". and than comes the Transpostion...

The effect uses DL's so I assume it has been invented after the time Vernon popularized de Double L*** in the 1920??

I think the Bluff pass was first introduces by -LePaul in Tarbell Course in Magic - Volume 3 around 1927

I found the effect described in Paul Cummins FASDIU as Bare None
also he states:"This (...) is a newer presentation of an old chestnut..."
No olde credits are given but it was published before in Precusror, William Miesel 1992

The line i wrote big above seems to be freequently used today. Even Denis Behr has it in his book Handcrafted Card Magic.
And of course after the first Blaine special, where I heard it the first time, if became abused by Ellusionst and seems nowadays only be known as "here than there"

I would really appreciate if you guys could track down with me the original credits for this trick!!
Best Regards
TMK
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Postby Richard Kaufman » 07/14/08 04:19 PM

Most two-card transpostions are inspired by the Scarne effect done in the old Schaffer beer commercial.

The Bluff Shift was first published in a small British book (Wesminster Wizardry?)--before the Tarbell SYSTEM in 1927 (not the Course, which didn't start until 1940).

The other one commonly used is the Eddie Fechter version where you openly appear to switch the cards at the spectator's fingertips.
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Postby Mysterious Kid » 07/14/08 06:59 PM

Wow the commander in chief himself :)

Most two-card transpostions are inspired by the Scarne effect done in the old Schaffer beer commercial.


hmmm that's a long time ago...??
But in the old books there seems to be reference like Stars of Magic, Expert Card Technique, ...

My Libary is not that big but i can't find this handling before the one of Paul Cummins of 1996

You're absolutly right the according to Card College the bluff shift was first published in Westminster Wizardy but apperently without a cover card..
I got the Tarbell Course information of Denis Behr's book archive, don't know why it says 1927 Magic Book Archive

Yes the other effect abused by Ellusionit as Two Card Monte is "Eddie Fechter's - Be honest what's is it"

Thanks for the quick respond!!
Any further hints are highly appreciated.
Best Regards
TMK
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Postby Philippe Billot » 07/15/08 03:17 PM

Just for the fun.

The first or one of the first explanation of Two Card Transposition was in Nouvelles rcrations mathmatiques et physiques (written by Gilles-Edme Guyot in 1769) under the title Les cartes changeantes sous la main.

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Postby Reinhard Mueller » 08/14/08 05:35 PM

Richard Kaufman wrote:Most two-card transpostions are inspired by the Scarne effect done in the old Schaffer beer commercial.

The Bluff Shift was first published in a small British book (Wesminster Wizardry?)--before the Tarbell SYSTEM in 1927 (not the Course, which didn't start until 1940).

The other one commonly used is the Eddie Fechter version where you openly appear to switch the cards at the spectator's fingertips.


Compare with what is to read in WHALEY'S DICTIONARY:
Bluff Pass; bluff pass
n. A sleight for controlling a playing card replaced in the deck, bringing it second from the top in
most handlings.
[fairly common]
First explained in Ellis Stanyon's New Card Tricks, 2nd Series (1902), 5. Later by Dr. Elliott
(ca1915 and 1923) and by Frederick Montague, M.P., in his Westminster Wizardry (1928), 75,
where he brought the card to the top. Victor Farelli modified this by 1932. Tommy Tucker then
became the first cardman to bring the card in second, which is now the most usual handling and
meaning. Tuckers version became a pet sleight of Paul LePaul. REF: Farelli in Hugards
Magic Monthly (Feb 1953), 1046, and (May 1955), 285; Farelli (1933), 29; Busby in Epoptica #1
(1982), 39.
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