Illusion learning

A place where beginners can participate, ask questions, and post their views. However, beginners typically ask a lot of questions about sources, tricks, books, and so on. In fact, all magicians are interested (or should be) in the provenance of tricks, ideas, and related matters. This department will service these needs.

Postby djl » 03/26/08 06:54 AM

Which is the best source to learn how to perform illusions such as Metamorphosis, penetrations and levitations?

Thanks
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Postby Spellbinder » 03/26/08 07:12 AM

The ONLY source to learn how to PERFORM Illusions is to get out on stage and do it. However, I think you may be looking for a source to LEARN how illusions work, which is much easier. If you want the most definitive source, try "The Seven Basic Secets of Illusion Design," by Eric Van Duzer.
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Postby David Alexander » 04/13/08 01:34 PM

There are other ways that will work. You could become an assistant to a working illusionist. You will be amazed at how much you'll learn on just one tour. You'll work hard, but if you pay attention, you'll have an education you couldn't find in a book.

Another way is to find an older illusionist who is working towards retirement and see if you can get him to mentor you.

If you are currently performing a stage act and it is well-rehearsed and working (that is, you know what you're doing on stage), you can work in one illusion at a time, growing your show slowly and carefully. Do not go out and buy a bunch of illusions and think you'll be successful right off the bat. Build slowly so that you know each prop thoroughly.
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Postby SteveP » 04/19/08 10:36 PM

David Alexander wrote:There are other ways that will work. You could become an assistant to a working illusionist. You will be amazed at how much you'll learn on just one tour. You'll work hard, but if you pay attention, you'll have an education you couldn't find in a book.


I'm going to echo David's advice. When I was a teenager I wanted to be an illusionist. I was fortunate when I was 16 to get a job with David Copperfield. The two years I spent with David made me realize I DID NOT want to become an illusionist.

I don't know what your situation is, but my advice would be to take a year away from your magic, work for an illusionist and see what it really takes.
There were so many factors I hadn't considered and once I saw what it took to put on an illusion show (David's show was much smaller back then - this is over 25 years ago)I realized I wouldn't have the commitment to it.
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Postby David Alexander » 04/20/08 01:25 PM

As an illusionist you are the CEO of a small business. The responsibilities are massive, far beyond that of an ordinary theatrical magician.

If there are 500 things a working pro thinks about that amateurs don't know, the illusionist has a 1,000. It's best to learn it slowly, over years.

While I have never been a working illusionist, I have friends who are or have been. It is massively difficult, which is why there are so few who are successful at it.
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