Street Magic Magazine

Talk about what is being written in other magic publications.

Postby Guest » 01/28/07 12:01 PM

What do you guys think about the fact that Street Magic Magazine wil be available to the public, right next to Rolling Stone and Cosmopolitan? I think it's just great to expose the public to the art and I cant wait to read the magazine!

Seb
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 01/28/07 12:35 PM

Just what the Genii board needs: a humor section.
Guest
 

Postby Richard Kaufman » 01/28/07 12:53 PM

hahaha--funny.

Genii and MAGIC were both sold in Tower Books and Records until they went out of business. The world didn't end--we just got a few more people interested in magic.

In case no one has noticed, the memberships in organizations like IBM and SAM have been dropping 10% a year as older members die and fewer new members enter.

Our field is contracting! We need to entice young men and women, and kids, into an interest in magic or our field will die.

There WILL come a point where there will literally not be enough people to support two organizations and either the IBM or SAM will cease to exist; a time when there won't be enough people to support two independent magazines and either Genii or MAGIC will cease to exist--and the one remaining will be available ONLY by download because it will be too expensive because of the low number of subscribers for the publisher to physically print and mail it.

That's what the future is looking like right now.

So, if Street Magic magazine is going to appear on newstands I say "Bravo!" Get more young people interested in magic because otherwise the future looks damn bleak.
Subscribe today to Genii Magazine
User avatar
Richard Kaufman
 
Posts: 20651
Joined: 07/18/01 12:00 PM
Location: Washington DC

Postby Geno Munari » 01/28/07 02:22 PM

Kaufman is 150% CORRECT.
Geno Munari
 
Posts: 624
Joined: 01/30/08 01:00 PM
Location: Las Vegas/Del Mar, CA

Postby Ian Kendall » 01/28/07 03:37 PM

It's an interesting debate, and not one that can be easily answered. MagicSeen is available in bookshops in the YooKay, but it's in Borders which has a very large, specialised magazine section. There are so many different titles on so many different topics that it's often hard to find the one you are looking for, much less find something by accident (I have to travel across the city to the only Borders in Edinburgh to collect a magazine as no other shops carry it. Borders is several miles out of town in a shopping centre, so it's not easy to get to). Magic has not died in the YooKay because MagicSeen is there for all to see. I doubt this will happen with Street Magic.

Although Richard has a point about organisations dying through attrition, I don't think it's a lack of youngsters in the art. A quick trip to the Penguin or Ellusionist fora will show that there are scads of young people who are getting into magic. The problem lies with getting them interested in the old guard.

I'm surprised, and a little dissappointed, in the numbers of people I meet lately who read neither Magic or Genii. A frightening number have never even seen a copy. Thinking about this, what could a clueless hack guess as to the reasons?

Is a subscription a daunting invenstment for your average school age mage? In adulthood I do not blink at handing over my dues each year at Blackpool, but would I have been so cavalier with my forty pounds twenty years ago? That's a lot of instant downloads that can be traded and viewed for instant gratification. Does the fifteen year old raised on Blaine, Brown and Angel have the attention to read a twenty page article on someone who died fifty/sixty/two hundred years ago? Are they interested in the letters from the past in Magic? Do we care?

History, as has been said by many more eloquent than I, is vital to understanding the art (how did I know that?) I've heard the horror stories of young magi showing Voodoo Zone to Roy Walton, and then not believing that he invented Card Warp in the first place, or Roy being shown the 'best street trick in the world'. It was, incidently, Four for Ascanio; the performer - again - didn't believe that it was Roy's trick, and Roy couldn't be bothered to get his book off the shelf to prove it. Then there was the classic 'who is this Vernon person, anyway?'. Cue Derek.

The challenge for Stan and Richard, and whoever runs IBM and SAM, is to make them appealing for the young crowd. If that means weaning them on magazines like Street Magic then Yay.

I'm as guilty as most in disparaging the Penguin/E crowd. I'm trying to change, but looking from another angle - they are hardly likely to come an join those that poured such scorn on them in the past.

As I said, I don't have the answers, but the thread did strike a chord.

Take care, Ian
Ian Kendall
 
Posts: 2123
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Edinburgh

Postby Guest » 01/28/07 03:40 PM

While I agree with Richard's assessment, I honestly believe that a for the public magazine about Street Magic is to narrow a focus. I believe they will eventually have to open up to more general magic or they will fail.
That said, I have to admit the first issue as displayed on their web site is very snazzy looking.

Gord
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 01/29/07 01:06 AM

I doubt that magazines interest people in hobbies. Hobbies generate interest in magazines.
Guest
 

Postby Richard Kaufman » 01/29/07 08:53 AM

Whether it's too narrow a focus or not is another issue.
I'm surprised that the cover subject for their first issue is Cyril Takayama. If they're trying to appeal to the public, they've picked a person who's almost completely unknown, and if they're trying to appeal to magicians, he was just covered in MAGIC last year.
Subscribe today to Genii Magazine
User avatar
Richard Kaufman
 
Posts: 20651
Joined: 07/18/01 12:00 PM
Location: Washington DC

Postby John LeBlanc » 01/29/07 09:10 AM

Originally posted by Richard Kaufman:
Whether it's too narrow a focus or not is another issue.
It seems to me the more narrow the focus, the greater its chances of succeeding. Mere mortals are no match for the already established broad-appeal magazines.

John
http://www.escamoteurettes.com/blog/
John LeBlanc
 
Posts: 866
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Houston, TX

Postby Guest » 01/29/07 10:08 AM

I don't think magic is dying, it is transforming. Who says that the journal or the society as we know them are the most appropriate forms to serve our community?

Best,
Chris....
www.lybrary.com
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 01/29/07 10:51 AM

Originally posted by Chris Wasshuber:
I don't think magic is dying, it is transforming. Who says that the journal or the society as we know them are the most appropriate forms to serve our community?

Best,
Chris....
www.lybrary.com
I agree. Surely ebooks are the best way?

If only I knew somewhere to get some...
Guest
 

Postby Brad Henderson » 01/29/07 11:48 AM

When you people come to a magic meeting, what do they see? Vibrant, technically compentent performances that reflect modern interests and themes or something very, very different?

I don't know if I have ever seen a young person with a cursory interest in magic stay on after one or two meetings. Sure, the die hard kid will stay with it, but the kid who is normal usually finds something relevant to fill their time.

Plus, I cannot see how it is in Ellusionists or Penguin's interest to encourage their demographics to become parts of clubs or read magazines. They may actually learn something or get good advice from someone with experience. Heaven forbid they start learning the originals of the tricks they peddle in watered down variations or have someone show them why a trick without a beginning or end is only good for the web cam.
Brad Henderson
 
Posts: 2459
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: austin, tx

Postby Guest » 01/29/07 05:59 PM

Originally posted by mrgoat:
I agree. Surely ebooks are the best way?
That depends how you define 'best'.

Chris....
Guest
 

Postby Geno Munari » 01/29/07 08:07 PM

In this case it is simply a business issue. I wish anyone that takes a chance the best, because that is one of the turning points of success.

Another publication in print, why? It is a fact that more and more daily newspapers have diminished.

Online is the way to go. And that is what the New York Times and LA times has learned.
I have an email subscription to the NY times each day. Why do I need a print version?
Maybe I'm wrong?

Everything is changing and so are the advertisers.

The ads placed in Genii and the others are divided into two groups. Good and Bad.

However should you blame the advertiser or the publisher.

In the NY Times you don't see bad ads. Why so? I don't know.

My real feelings are for the publishers who take big chances.

They aren't under the wing of a giant corp.

May the best actor win! (Haha)
Geno Munari
 
Posts: 624
Joined: 01/30/08 01:00 PM
Location: Las Vegas/Del Mar, CA

Postby Guest » 01/29/07 08:42 PM

Originally posted by Richard Kaufman:
I'm surprised that the cover subject for their first issue is Cyril Takayama. If they're trying to appeal to the public, they've picked a person who's almost completely unknown, and if they're trying to appeal to magicians, he was just covered in MAGIC last year.
I thought it was clear whom they are trying to appeal to: adolecent boys who know magic only from clips on YouTube and Elusionist.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 01/30/07 07:03 AM

It's interesting that this discussion went from is it good that "Street Magic Magazine is available to the public" to the revelation that magic club membership is dropping.

It's true, many magic clubs have become stale, but it's not just young magicians they don't appeal to.

I wrote about my idea of 'The Perfect Magic Club' on our blog almost two years ago:

Part 1 http://magicunlimited.typepad.com/magic ... t_mag.html

Part 2
http://magicunlimited.typepad.com/magic ... mag_1.html

Part 3
http://magicunlimited.typepad.com/magic ... mag_2.html

Some clubs found these ideas helpful, and wrote to tell me they were able to increase their membership and that's great. I think every club needs to experiment and to try new ideas to keep their members interested and to attract more members. (Though, there are some clubs who have made it quite clear to me that they don't WANT new members... they're happy the way they are).

Another area of magic that's being affected are conventions. Many conventions run by clubs and societies are phasing out because no-one could be bothered running them any more, and the few that remain and continue to be successful are run by magic dealers. People who have a financial stake in the success of the event.

(I would LOVE to hear that Ellusionist or Penguin decide to run a magic convention. They would attract soooo many young magicians eager to learn and they could expose them to top flight magicians LIVE instead of on the computer screen. But financially, could that end up costing E or P business as their customers discover they can jam with each other and swap tricks for free? After all, any bricks and mortar magic dealer knows the guys from the local club are the ones who spend the least money in the shop...)

That brings us back to Street Magic Magazine. It's published by a dealer, Black's Magic, and the bottom line is that it will have to be a financial success and attract more people to his e-store. It's a brave move. Yes, they could create more magicians, but the main aim has got to be to create more customers.

Chris Wasshuber is right. Magic is transforming. Whether that's a good thing or a bad thing... time will tell.

TIM ELLIS
Guest
 

Postby Brad Henderson » 01/30/07 01:30 PM

Originally posted by Tim Ellis:

I would LOVE to hear that Ellusionist or Penguin decide to run a magic convention. They would attract soooo many young magicians eager to learn and they could expose them to top flight magicians LIVE instead of on the computer screen.TIM ELLIS
IF they chose to take that route. My bet would be that it would end up being a weekend long dealer's show featuring all their "in house" super stars.

Why expose them to Chateubriand when they happily wolf down McDonalds?
Brad Henderson
 
Posts: 2459
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: austin, tx

Postby Guest » 01/30/07 01:49 PM

Brad,

let's be honest, if you owned and operated McDonald's would you expose them to any other brand either?
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/02/07 10:10 PM

So am I to believe there's really such a thing now as a real "street magician"?

And I'm not talking about a busker. I mean a real "street magician".

If so, it's like the opposite of reality TV. They make up something for TV and then it becomes real later, except not on TV? And then a magazine comes out about it?
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/03/07 08:21 AM

I help out at Midwest Magic in Franklin Park on Saturdays. Interestingly enough virtually every week we have some young magicians who were exposed to Street Magic and have purchased items from Ellusionist and Penguin walk into the shop. They search on line and find Tim's shop as they have developed an interest in magic and want to see what else is available. We'll demonstrate a few items gleaned from books,etc. Most seem anxious to learn more and will purchase a book or DVD geared more towards developing as magicians (i.e. Roth or Dill DVD's or Card College, EATCT or Royal Road) per our suggestions. We see a lot of them coming back for more.

My experience bottom line has been those younger magicians truly interested in magic will take the next step and seek out knowledge and learn if we make the effort and don't just write them off.

Unfortunately with the impending demise of brick and mortar shops with a qualified staff it makes it difficult for them to get this knowledge.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/16/07 09:54 PM

In a thread on another forum James Clark, publisher of "Street Magic Magazine", stated that the magazine would both have articles on Magicians and "how to's" as well, or as he put it #2. If presenting magic magazines with "how to's" in them on racks the general public walks by everyday is a good thing for Magic, and I'm willing to accept the premise that I am wrong about that approach, why not make a push to have all Magic literature available to the general public? A bookstore has fiction, nonfiction, cooking, self help, etc.
let's push to have Magic in there to. Fund it ourselves if we have to. After all it would be respectful to magic and further the art. WalMart
has a book section, we could get plenty of viewers there.

There are cooking, how to fix your house, fishing, gardening, etc. shows on the television. How about a how to for magic as well? Magic is just as good a hobby as they are. Commercials from Magic dealers and suppliers. Then again by what I read that Masked Magician didn't set to well with our community did it? Stupid Magicians, we just don't
know how respectful that was and what it did to further our art.

Radio is another great medium that reaches out. Have people call in with questions about how to and every week a different Magician could
be the guest and answer them. Caller: "Last night I saw a Magician and he made a card I chose disappear from the deck and appear in his
wallet. I would like to do this for my friends down at the gym. How do I do that?"

The Internet is already doing it's fair share with such sites as YouTube. P2P fills in a nice gap for those pirate minded. I say it's time other media stepped up with our help and pulled their weight. We need a Johnny Appleseed of magic fellows. Someone who won't stop till everyone gets their every question answered about this craft/art. Then
everyone can respect magic and further the art. Name the cause "More Magic for Everyone". Surely that's not a bad idea. Then magic clubs will survive and Magic won't fade away, dieing a horrible slow death.

The words above, with minor changes to address things in this thread, were deleted from that other forum and I was banned from it. Quite an honor as I look back on it. It's good to see opposing viewpoints are not deleted here. Discussion is the way I learn things, both in defending my views, and having others defend theirs.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/17/07 09:48 AM

So am I to believe there's really such a thing now as a real "street magician"?

And I'm not talking about a busker. I mean a real "street magician".

If so, it's like the opposite of reality TV. They make up something for TV and then it becomes real later, except not on TV? And then a magazine comes out about it?
Frank asks some interesting questions but I've seen no replies. I assume the magazine is not about real Street Magic in the Gazzo/Sheridan/Cellini sense but the Blaine/Cyril/Criss Angel sense, so in the rest of the post "Street Magician" means the Blaine/Cyril/Criss type (if that phenomena even exists outside TV).

If someone reading this thinks of themselves as a Street Magician, could you please reply and try to explain what it is you do? Are there any professional Street Magicians? Or is a professional Street Magician someone that labels themselves a Street Magician and sells tricks and items labeled Street Magic but not earning any money from doing the actual Street Magic? I have a feeling that Street Magician is the new term for hobbyists that like doing tricks for free for people at parties, clubs and pubs. Does anyone really do it the Blaine/Cyril/Criss way, walking up to random people on the street to do tricks for them for free?

Could it be that the Street Magician this magazine is aimed at doesn't exist other than on TV?

Wonders,

/Tomas
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/17/07 09:52 AM

I went in a very large bookstore (5 stories!) in Fukuoka, Japan last summer and asked to be directed to the "Magc" section, expecting to find a dozen or so titles, as one typically does at a Barnes and Noble or Border's type store here in America. I was astonished to find about twenty shelf feet or so of books and videos, including several volumes of the Japanese translation of Roberto Giobbi's CARD COLLEGE series, the Tarbell Course, Phil Goldstein's FOCUS, etc. There were also contemporary magic magazines that I had seen for sale in Ton Onosaka's shop in Tokyo. I don't think this shop is typical, but I also don't see that having such a section in a public shop harms magic. One has to be pretty interested in the art already to seek out such things and a casual perusal of the shelf will not do any lasting damage. If one commits to purchase one of the technical books, one is likely already much more interested in learning such secrets than the average Joe, and likely an ally of the art rather than a detractor. I think most laymen really don't care how we do our tricks and have little interest in learning the secrets. They know there IS a secret, and that is enough to satisfy their interest. The masked magician shows were insulting to the art because of their attitude toward exposure. Had they been framed as "Look how clever and smart magicians are to have devised and perfected these subtleties over the centuries" rather than "look how stupid these tricks are once you know how they are done," the response of both the public and magic community to them might have been different...
As I understand it, STREET MAGIC MAGAZINE will be sealed, so one must purchase it to access the contents. Few who do not have a sincere interest in learning more about magic (allies, rather than detractors) will do so. The big question regarding the long term success of this venture is whether there are indeed enough magic fans out there to make this a viable enterprise. It will be interesting to see how they do. I wish them well.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/17/07 11:24 AM

RE Magic having a shrinking membership
If you make your living selling to magicians I can see how this could be less than good
However If you support yourself performing magic It's less competition Not a bad thing
Isn't magic's purpose to be exclusive Inlike "paint by numbers, not to have every one do it
from
Ford
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/17/07 01:09 PM

Ford.

Magic's purpose is to entertain and amaze.
Thinking or believing that magic is an exclusive club is ill conceived and just a bit arrogant.
Instead of thinking that way we should welcome and encourage new magicians, because without them magic will not have a future.

I would like to mention that this Street Magic magazine is not the first magic magazine for the public. Anyone remember "Houdini's Magic Magazine?' Available to the public and the world did not stop spinning.

Gord
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/17/07 02:00 PM

Gord, I certainly do remember Houdinis Magic Magazine which was preceded by The Magic Magazine which was on newsstands when I first got interested in magic around 1977 but had been around since 1974. I can also remember attending a magic club meeting around that time and being baffled by the dismissive and condescending attitude of some of the attendees when I mentioned reading those magazines. The truth is those magazines did nothing to damage magic and actually contained some pretty good articles for an aspiring conjurer I especially remember pieces by James Randi and an interview with Derek Dingle that I must've read twenty times. I hope this new magazine fares well and brings others into the art.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/17/07 02:47 PM

Their updated website www.streetmagicmagazine.com currently shows what will apparently be some of the articles in the March/April introductory issue. One of them has the headline "Every year your butt spends about 40 or so hours on the john. Put that time to use!"
I got curious about that statistic, so let's do the math: 40 hours/year= 46 minutes/week=7 minutes/day... I guess that might be right if I weren't spending so much john time reading magic magazines!
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/17/07 05:03 PM

Hmm, now that I've seen their cover, I wonder if the SM logo will attract a.... different... crowd?
Guest
 

Postby Richard Kaufman » 02/17/07 05:33 PM

Certainly looks different than Genii, MAGIC, M-U-M, or The Linking Ring.
Subscribe today to Genii Magazine
User avatar
Richard Kaufman
 
Posts: 20651
Joined: 07/18/01 12:00 PM
Location: Washington DC

Postby Guest » 02/18/07 07:01 AM

I wonder if it comes with a CD of loud, obnoxious music?

Adrian
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/22/07 10:10 AM

This concept seems a lot like WWF. A made-for-TV wrestling match, and then a magazine about it comes out celebrating the wrestlers, and selling the gear.

I am not sure anything harmful can come from that. I appreciate that the magazine will be in a bag. A good and responsible idea.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 02/27/07 12:10 AM

Frank, that actually makes sense. So it's not a magazine for the non-existant real life Street Magicians, but for the fans of the Street Magicians on TV.

/Tomas
Guest
 

Postby Ian Kendall » 02/27/07 08:14 AM

If you had asked me a couple of hours ago, I probably would have passed on Street Magic at first. However, an hour ago I had a very pleasant and 'enlightening' phone call with James, the editor and publisher of the magazine.

He took the time to tell me about his goals for the magazine, and the kind of content that I could expect to find there. In line with the paucity of information that has been released I'm not sure I'm at liberty to divulge (as it were) but when I asked what the magazine would be like in broad terms his answer seemed to make sense; the bastard love child of Genii and FHM.

Now I'm fairly certain that this will not harm magic, and I'm beginning to think it may do some good. I don't know if it's because the editor bothered to call me out of the blue and chat for half and hour, or the type of articles that seem to be lined up, but I'll give it the benefit of the doubt for now (and parts of the 'Surviving Street Magic' article sound quite, er, extreme...)

Take care, Ian
Ian Kendall
 
Posts: 2123
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Edinburgh

Postby John LeBlanc » 02/27/07 11:20 AM

frank starsinic writes:
I appreciate that the magazine will be in a bag. A good and responsible idea.
I don't see any significant difference that makes. There are plenty of poly bagged magazines on the rack at Barnes & Noble. Someone inevitably removes the wrap and leaves it on the rack as a reader.

I also don't see any big deal about the magazine being on the rack to begin with. Fifty or sixty feet from the magazine rack is a shelf with magic books on it. None of them are wrapped.

I hope the magazine does well. A rising tide and all of that.

John
John LeBlanc
 
Posts: 866
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Houston, TX

Postby Guest » 03/02/07 09:26 AM

Gord wrote:
Magic's purpose is to entertain and amaze.
This may be true for you, but is it true for everyone involved in magic? Maybe so, maybe not.

For some, the purpose of magic is to make money, either by amazing or by selling their wares. For some people, it's just another widget.

For some, the purpose of magic is to show that the "performer" is somehow more intelligent or more fun to be around than everyone else. In many cases, it fails miserably.

-------------

Regarding membership numbers in magic organizations -- if these are shrinking so much, why are conventions attended by larger and larger crowds?

Could this shrinkage be a result of the same kind of "market correction" that affected the stock markets these past few days?

During the 1970's there was a very active movement among the American magical organizations to expand membership almost without regard to who the potential members were. Is this coming back to haunt the clubs?
Guest
 

Postby Dave Egleston » 03/03/07 11:45 AM

Mr. Palmer wrote:


"Regarding membership numbers in magic organizations -- if these are shrinking so much, why are conventions attended by larger and larger crowds?"

At the last WMS a few weeks ago, I asked about 50 folks over the course of the convention if they belonged to any Society or Brotherhood and was only answered in the affirmative about 20 times and half of those were, like myself, unaffiliated with any ring or assembly for the singular reason of attending their conventions.

I also asked several magicians who made their living exclusively through the performance of magic** and had some interesting replies.

A couple of folks were of the opinion; It took Robert Houdin to overcome the general disdain for magicians as street trash for centuries, and present magic as art presented on stage as high entertainment. These folks were "peeved" with the current trend toward guerrilla magic and was afraid that may be further regression to the street trash label again.

More than half were pleased with the concept but were surprised to hear that the magazine was going to be offered to the general public.

The rest of those I asked were fairly ambivalent.

Personally, I met some scary good "kids" last week at the WMS and if their initial exposure was due to e-llusionist/penguin magic/STREET MAGIC magazine are we missing the point?

Isn't it easier to GOOGLE or YOU TUBE a Half Pass exposure than read about it in a magazine?

Please don't read me wrong - I don't enjoy being accosted by a dubious looking young man who opens with "Watch....Watch... Looklooklook" as a prelude to a card trick, but there are those who do.

As far as the "Lay" audience reading STREET MAGIC and learning the secrets of magic, it won't happen.

Dave

** Some of these guys also had a product line of magic they sold so they may have an interest in another venue to advertise their wares.
Dave Egleston
 
Posts: 429
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Ceres, Ca.

Postby Guest » 03/04/07 08:15 PM

Is the first issue out yet? And does anyone know if it will be available in Canada? Perhaps in magic shops?
Guest
 

Postby Richard Kaufman » 03/05/07 09:16 AM

I don't know of anyone who's seen the first issue yet. 10,000 copies are being given away free to magic shops (though I don't know if that includes shops in Canada).
With an initial print run of 25,000, no one should have any trouble procuring a copy of the first issue.
Subscribe today to Genii Magazine
User avatar
Richard Kaufman
 
Posts: 20651
Joined: 07/18/01 12:00 PM
Location: Washington DC

Postby Guest » 03/05/07 11:00 AM

The only thing I can relate this to would be the martial art magazines that are available in Chapters. They have fighters that the general public don't know, they show how to do moves, be it ju-jitsu, muay thai, karate, or what ever new martial art someone made up in their back yard with his buddies over a 6 pack.

Martial artists didn't worry about the general public having access to these. Mainly because to get good at it, you have to practise.

And if someone is interested the magazine will catch their eye, if they weren't looking for it, they won't find it.

I'm just happy its something I can find on the magazine rack so I don't have to drive 2 hours to pick up my copy.

And I'm not a fan of subscribtions only because the mailperson never notices the do not bend sign on any of my packages.
Guest
 

Postby John McDonald » 04/06/07 12:24 PM

Has anyone had a copy in their hands yet? We are still waiting in the UK althoug I heard mid April maybe? Anyone?
Best John
John McDonald
 
Posts: 324
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Chester, UK

Next

Return to Other Magic Publications