David Bowie Has Much "Prestige"

Discussions of new films, books, television shows, and media indirectly related to magic and magicians. For example, there may be a book on mnemonics or theatrical technique we should know or at least know about.

Postby Guest » 11/22/05 07:32 AM

More interesting casting news for the film version of "The Prestige".
Are there any other lovers of this great, if unsettling, book? I recommend it highly...


Posted: Monday November 21st, 2005 11:44pm
Source: Variety
Author: Garth Franklin

David Bowie will join the Christopher Nolan-directed "The Prestige" for Touchstone Pictures and Warner Bros. Pictures reports Variety. Hugh Jackman, Christian Bale and Michael Caine star in the story of two rival magicians constantly trying to one-up each other.

In 'Prestige' Bowie will play inventor and electrical wizard Nikola Tesla, who is approached by one of two competing magicians for help in pulling off the ultimate magic trick in 1878. The Tesla character is based on the real-life Serbian-American inventor who discovered the rotating magnetic field.

Aside from a "Zoolander" cameo, Bowie hasn't starred in a film since "Basquiat" in 1996. "Prestige" will begin production in January.
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Postby John LeBlanc » 11/22/05 08:52 AM

Originally posted by John Tudor:
In 'Prestige' Bowie will play inventor and electrical wizard Nikola Tesla
Yes, but will he sport a snow white tan?

John
http://www.escamoteurettes.com/blog/
John LeBlanc
 
Posts: 878
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Houston, TX

Postby Guest » 11/22/05 10:13 AM

Originally posted by John LeBlanc:
Originally posted by John Tudor:
[b]In 'Prestige' Bowie will play inventor and electrical wizard Nikola Tesla
Yes, but will he sport a snow white tan?

John
http://www.escamoteurettes.com/blog/ [/b]
Or is this his way of announcing his decision to be AC and not DC?

Tesla played... with sparks!
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Postby John LeBlanc » 11/22/05 11:01 AM

Originally posted by Jonathan Townsend:
Tesla played... with sparks!
But Ziggy played it left hand.

John
http://www.escamoteurettes.com/blog/
John LeBlanc
 
Posts: 878
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Houston, TX

Postby Guest » 11/22/05 11:29 AM

But where were the spiders?
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Postby Guest » 11/22/05 11:47 AM

Originally posted by saheer:
But where were the spiders?
They probably ran away from the high frequency AC current and radio waves produced.

The guy used to dress up and wear white gloves to do experiments. This could be very interesting. Especially as Nicholas was an Edison employee till they fell out over the AD/DC thing.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 11/22/05 04:31 PM

Well, from all accounts, the meter comes out better on a stolen guitar.

H
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 11/22/05 05:34 PM

Has anybody (else) read the book?
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 11/23/05 03:58 PM

Here's a quick synopsis, lifted from Amazon.com/Publisher's Weekly:
Christopher Priest's novel (the title of which refers to the residue left after a magician's successful trick) is enthrallingly odd. In a carefully calculated period style that is remarkably akin to that of the late Robertson Davies, Priest writes of a pair of rival magicians in turn-of-the-century London. Each has a winning trick the other craves, but so arcane is the nature of these tricks, so incredibly difficult are they to perform, that they take on a peculiar life of their own?in one case involving a mysterious apparent double identity, in the other a reliance on the ferocious powers unleashed in the early experimental years of electricity. The rivalry of the two men is such that in the end, though both are ashamed of the strength of their feelings of spite and envy, it consumes them both, and affects their respective families for generations. This is a complex tale that must have been extremely difficult to tell in exactly the right sequence, while still maintaining a series of shocks to the very end. Priest has brought it off with great imagination and skill. It's only fair to say, though, that the book's very considerable narrative grip is its principal virtue. The characters and incidents have a decidedly Gothic cast, and only the restraint that marks the story's telling keeps it on the rails.
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