Card to pocket

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Postby Guest » 10/11/03 02:04 PM

Hello,

I seek various versions of card to the pocket.

Help-me please.

John.
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Postby Pete Biro » 10/11/03 02:45 PM

Stars of Magic, Frances Carlysle's "Homing Card" is wonderful.
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Postby Michael Kamen » 10/11/03 03:49 PM

I'll second that.
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Postby Guest » 10/11/03 05:49 PM

Marlo has an excellent repeat card-to-pocket routine in his monograph The Action Palm. Very clean, very deceptive, using subtlety in addition to a well-covered (and not difficult) palm.
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Postby Guest » 10/12/03 08:34 AM

Aaron Fisher offers a good version with no sleights called " the bicycle thief " .I bought it from his website . I've " killed" a few times with it.
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Postby Kevin Wiese » 10/13/03 07:40 AM

Roberto Giobbi's version of Homing Card is in Card College vol. 2.
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Postby Guest » 10/17/03 05:09 AM

Try Lazy Man's Card to Pocket from Expert Card Technique, or Only Had Two, by Larry Jennings, which I learned from Bill Malone's On The Loose video series Volume 4.


If you get the book, Secrets of Brother John Hamman you will learn...oh, many things,too many to tell, and they will include a number of ways to get a card from the deck to your pocket.
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Postby Guest » 10/17/03 08:48 AM

A few of my faves:

Paul Harris "Whack Your Pack" (from "Art of Astonshment" and on his first Tannen vid) This routine developed my confidence to palm.

David Williamson's "51 Cards to Pocket" (great follow-up to the Carlyle routine.) A better climax for card to pocket would be hard to find.

for the daring:
Gary Kurtz has a wonderful 4 for 4 pocket transo. I believe he calls it "Pocket Interchange" (from 'Unexplainable Acts) & on his "Creating Magic" vid, look for 'Gary in your pockets" (there are a few routines of this variety, IMO, this one's the best... Jack Carpenter has another good one... as does Steve Reynolds.)

Honorable Mention: Jerry Sadowitz "Card That Doesn't go to Pocket" from 'Cards on the Table' (a typically brilliant structure.)

k, nuff for me... (maybe too much!?)

good luck on your quest,
Doug Conn
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Postby Richard Kaufman » 10/17/03 10:11 AM

There is a stunning and direct version of Card to Pocket in Cliff Green's book Professional Card Magic called "Special Delivery."
The chosen card is signed and returned to the deck. The spectator names ANY pocket and with no dawdling the card is removed from that pocket.
Not for the faint of heart! :)
Also, Larry Jennings' "Duffer's Cards to Pocket" in Arcane is very good.
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Postby Bob Farmer » 10/17/03 05:47 PM

Here's a version I published in Genii --

BRAIN TO WALLET

EFFECT: A card merely thought of appears in the magician's wallet.

METHOD: No sleights. No moves.

You need a deck of cards, a Sharpie and a hip-pocket wallet. The wallet has six bills in it.

Start with the wallet and the pen on the table.

After the spectator shuffles the cards, have him deal two hands of poker. He chooses one of the hands. You take the deck and add the other hand to the top.

Say that this a game of mental poker. Have the spectator think of any card in his hand. He then mixes the cards face down so that even he does not know the location of the thought card.

Place the five cards face down on top of the deck and false shuffle retaining them there.

Still holding the deck, pick up the wallet, open it and remove a bill. Hand the bill to the spectator, along with the pen.

As you say that somewhere in the deck is the thought card, spread off five cards, obtain a break below them, then square them back on the deck, maintaining the break.

Ask the spectator to write the name of his thought card on the bill and then fold the bill. The rationale: you want to keep him honest in the game that follows and you want to ensure that he doesn't forget his card.

Turn your back to him as he does the writing.

Once you turn, shove the five card packet into the wallet. Keep the wallet closed and use your right thumb as a guide. You can stick your thumb into the wallet prying it apart far enough to allow a smooth insertion of the five cards.

Turn around when the spectator finishes. Drop the deck on the table. Open the wallet and pretend to count the bills, glimpsing the face of the first card in the packet as you do so.

Tip the wallet up and back slightly, so only you can see its interior.

Tell the spectator that you have only got five bills left. You are going to try and guess his
card, one bill for each guess. If you don't guess it before you run out of money, all the money on the table is his.

Guess the card you just glimpsed. If you're right, pick up your money and then offer a side bet (more about the side bet later).

If you guessed wrong, dig into your wallet and move the first card out of the way by sliding it to the other end of the wallet. Glimpse the new card on the face of the packet. Remove the next bill and guess again.

There is no need to hide the action of sliding the card to the other end of the wallet since from the spectator's point of view it looks as if you are simply separating a bill before removing it.

Continue this process until your guess is right.

Drop the wallet on the table. Offer a double or nothing bet. Hand the deck to the spectator and have him shuffle it then place it on the table.

Bet the spectator that even though he has thoroughly shuffled the deck, you know the exact location of his card.

It could fifteen cards from the top, or twenty-five cards, but you know exactly where it is.

Once he accepts the bet, pick up the wallet and remove the thought card. Pocket the wallet. You can add the four other cards back to the deck later.
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Postby Guest » 10/18/03 11:40 AM

Darwin Ortiz offers an extremely clean version in his new book, although it's not exactly impromptu, as you'll see when you read the method. Similarly, Barry Price has published a wonderful method in "Escotage" if you're willing to prepare in advance (I can't say more without revealing the workings). Both of these approaches allow you to reach into your pocket and remove a signed card with a genuinely empty hand. True challenge conditions are being met here. Because of the expense and hassle in preparing, though, these methods are probably most appropriate to the working professional.
For a great impromptu method with an ordinary deck, I would recommend Peter Duffie's "two cards to pocket" routine.
If you want to do the classic cards to pocket routine with ten cards, the method in Chuck Smith's private manuscript is all you could ask for.
Finally, Jose Carroll's approach to getting a signed four of a kind into four different pockets (which can be found in "52 Lovers") is brilliant.
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Postby Guest » 10/21/03 05:13 PM

Originally posted by Magietest:
Hello,

I seek various versions of card to the pocket.

Help-me please.

John.
John, isn't card to wallet better than card to pocket? Is there a specific reason that card to pocket interests you more?

-Gavriel
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Postby Dave Shepherd » 10/22/03 03:28 AM

Originally posted by Gavriel:
John, isn't card to wallet better than card to pocket? Is there a specific reason that card to pocket interests you more?
???

He asked about Card to Pocket...

Yes, Card to Wallet is a very cool, very strong trick, but it's a different trick than what he asked about.

I do Card to Wallet and also Card(s) to Pocket. They're both good, and they're different.

Incidentally, last evening I saw John Carney perform and teach his Cards up the Sleeve (from Secrets), which is in many ways the same effect as Cards to Pocket. His is a great routine, and doesn't EVEN involve a wallet. :D
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Postby Guest » 10/22/03 08:06 AM

Originally posted by Dave Shepherd:
Originally posted by Gavriel:
[b] John, isn't card to wallet better than card to pocket? Is there a specific reason that card to pocket interests you more?
???

He asked about Card to Pocket...

Yes, Card to Wallet is a very cool, very strong trick, but it's a different trick than what he asked about.

I do Card to Wallet and also Card(s) to Pocket. They're both good, and they're different.

Incidentally, last evening I saw John Carney perform and teach his Cards up the Sleeve (from Secrets), which is in many ways the same effect as Cards to Pocket. His is a great routine, and doesn't EVEN involve a wallet. :D [/b]
Dave,
I realize he asked about card to pocket and not card to wallet. My question to him is why did he ask about card to pocket instead of card to wallet.

Card to wallet is a more impossible location and therefore a stronger effect than the card just being in the pocket. Furthermore if you ask about card to wallet you get the routine for card to pocket automatically.
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Postby Dave Shepherd » 10/22/03 11:11 AM

Well, okay, then, we can take this discussion into the relative strength of the effects.

The reason I use card to pocket (actually Giobbi's Homing Card Plus, more or less) is that it is involving, and the mystery at the climax is a laugh-out-loud moment.

I usually do card-to-pocket in the middle of a set, rather than as a closer.

The card-to-wallet presentation that I do (basically Burger's routine, with a top-loading wallet, with Frank Garcia's signature revelation at the end) is a closer. I cannot follow it with anything.

On another bulletin board there was a discussion recently, I believe, about the relative strength of tricks, and the necessity for varying the intensity. I don't know whether you mean that card-to-pocket is a lesser trick because it's not as intense, but if so, I would disagree.

If that's not what you mean, I humbly withdraw any objection.
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Postby Sens Fan 77 » 12/13/03 02:23 AM

Backlash by Paul Harris is a good signed card to pocket(no palm).
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