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Postby Guest » 05/24/03 01:56 AM

If you want to improve how well you do on search engines, check out this link http://siteowner.bcentral.com/system/meta.cfm

Great advice! I come in the top ten of most engines under "Canberra Magicians" now!

Has anyone else had any brainwaves to increase website traffic or improve their site.

www.funnybones.com.au (uses frontpage but it serves me VERY well)
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Postby Guest » 05/26/03 05:13 AM

Thanks Nicholas for the Metatag Checker, it was helpful.

Cheers,
Harry
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Postby Dan McLean Jr » 07/03/03 06:57 PM

Has anyone else had any brainwaves to increase website traffic or improve their site.
META TAGS are the easiest free way to make your site more visible to search engines. The other free way is to use reciprical, like-minded linking. That is to say, link to other magic-related sites, and try to get other magic-related sites to link to yours. Both techniques can take a while to get results, but they're free, and they make search engines see, for a fact, that your site is relevant.
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Postby Guest » 07/07/03 01:41 PM

Originally posted by Dan McLean Jr-MagicRoadie.com:
Has anyone else had any brainwaves to increase website traffic or improve their site.
META TAGS are the easiest free way to make your site more visible to search engines. The other free way is to use reciprical, like-minded linking. That is to say, link to other magic-related sites, and try to get other magic-related sites to link to yours. Both techniques can take a while to get results, but they're free, and they make search engines see, for a fact, that your site is relevant.
Having worked for a web development company for the past few years in my off hours from magic and the hypnosis racket, I felt the need to respond to the meta tag issue.

Many search engines now either ignore metatags or limit them to 10 words or less to avoid the numerous sites that load in hundreds of meta tags in an effort to improve their listings in the search engines. This is particularly true in the adult web site end of things (an area I do NOT deal with, BTW).

This is why you get some of these sites in innocent searches as "Disney" or "7 Dwarves" and the like.

So, search engine writers have started to look at the number of links to and from a site as a better way to determine placement - as well as many resorting to SELLING their top ten or twenty slots for cash.

It's a great income generator.

So be careful what words you use in meta tags and limit them to ten or so to improve your chances of a hit. There are several meta tag rating sites out there - do a search on the term and check some of them out. You'll find them VERY interesting.

Just some additional input.

Lee Darrow, C.Ht.
http://www.leedarrow.com
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Postby Bizzaro » 07/08/03 01:52 AM

You wanna increase traffic hits.. ok this is actually an accidental joke... but it's late so bear with me.

The title of one of my pages (The one with all of my characters photos) is "Prison Photos." I decided to look at where people were coming from via a search engine on my server and I was getting mad hits off people looking for, yup, you guessed it.. prison photos. If yer server has a way to check your hits off of sites.. do so. You'll find some very odd things.

Either way it increases yer hits hee hee.
Bizzaro.
www.smappdooda.com
www.bizzarobydesign.com
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Postby CHRIS » 07/08/03 09:48 AM

As the last post shows, hits are a very bad measure. Increasing hits to your website is not what you want. You want to attract the right people to your site. What good is it to 'trick' people to click to your site and then have them be disappointed because they didn't find what they were looking for.

The best way to increase your traffic is to have unique, useful contents on your site. Keep it updated and add regularly. Then the hits will come.

Chris Wasshuber
preserving magic one book at a time.
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Postby Scott Sullivan » 07/10/03 10:05 AM

Excellent point about attracting the right type of people to your site. In fact, trying to trick people to your site by using every meta tag possible or using certain keywords will actually hurt you in the long run. Allow me explain.

Many of the top portals/search engines including yahoo keep track of which links in a search result get clicked. This makes sense. If the number two listing gets more click-throughs, over time it will move to number one.

However, and this is key, when a visitor goes to yahoo (or another engine) they put a cookie on your site. You will also note you do not go directly to the site. The link (this is invisible to the user) looks more like http://www.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/something. ... result.com

It tracks users. Now when you click to a site, look at it and then hit the back button, Yahoo logs this. Now it's little algorithm thinks, "Gee, this user clicked to that site, then came right back and kept going down the list. That must mean that that's not a good link. I'll move it further DOWN the list."

I'm sure other board members could explain this better than I, but the end result is for certain. If more people are clicking to your site then hitting the back button to see the other results, it bumps you down on the list of importance.

So be honest with your keywords and don't try to trick others to your site. You're only hurting yourself.

Scott Sullivan
http://www.mugsandmagic.com/
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Postby Dan McLean Jr » 07/10/03 03:09 PM

Yep. The Net doesn't like cheaters. Use META TAGS sparingly, honestly and correctly. They're free and they help.
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Postby Guest » 07/11/03 01:16 PM

Speaking of websites, I just put mine online:

www.dougconn.com

any comments, etc are greatly appreciated.

(no meta-tags on it yet;) coming soon.

fyi: there's a couple of vid clips in the multimedia section (just put those online yesterday, so if anyone feels like checking them out and letting me know if they work, I'd appreciate it.)

thanks,
Doug Conn
connjure@hotmail.com
www.dougconn.com
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Postby CHRIS » 07/11/03 01:55 PM

Doug,

I looked at your site. Here are a few comments:
- I personally don't like background inverted links.
- the colors are good, the layout not my taste. Somehow the centered text appears a lot more 'busy' or 'noisy', less professional to me.
- the two video clips worked and your .com trick is a nice touch which reinforces your site name. Cool idea!

I noted you will be selling an ebook (CDROM) soon. If you care for a critique on it, let me know. I would be glad to share my experience with ebooks with you. Also if you would like me to take up your book into my ebook catalog, contact me by email.

Chris Wasshuber
preserving magic one book at a time.
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Postby Doug Dyment » 07/12/03 08:15 AM

I'm always somewhat astounded when I see sites used by mystery entertainers to advertise their services also being used to sell their products. Given that the incremental cost of owning an additional/separate domain name is well under $10/year, it can't be the lack of money that forces them to do this... but what it is, I just don't understand.

Does it not send the message that, "What I do really isn't all that special. Anyone can do it: just send $25 for my latest book, explaining all."?

Does this not also fly in the face of the first rule most of us learn as magicians? Never tell them how it's done!

... Doug
... Doug :: Proprietor of The Deceptionary
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Postby Guest » 07/12/03 12:26 PM

Astounded?

I'm always somewhat astounded when I see sites used by mystery entertainers to advertise their services also being used to sell their products <snip> it can't be the lack of money that forces them to do this... but what it is, I just don't understand.

Well, I'll explain my story:

The current chapter of my magi-bio finds me pursing work within the magi-community: lectures, conventions, etc. Thus, that is (one of) the focus of my site...at least for now.

I didn't build the site with the 'real' world as the first priority (though I still hope the site will attract some 'real' clients.) I expect to be magi-oriented for the next year or so (DVD projects, lecture tours, etc.) Once I'm done riding that wave (perhaps) I'll re-organize the site.

Playing devil's advocate... Here's a good reason to sell products on a magi-promo-site: Perhaps people's perceived value will increase when they see that you've produced and offered products for the magic community...? I think most people know you can buy magic books and tricks, so I don't think you're really bursting any bubbles.

I suppose if a web-magi considers selling and promoting on the same site 'taboo' then, it's simple enough to get a new domain... use one for selling product, another for promotion. I for one will continue to do both.

regards,
Doug Conn
(magi-ho)
www.dougconn.com
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Postby Guest » 07/14/03 10:27 AM

I think that it bodes well to have products for sale to other magicians at one's website. It shows potential clients (supposedly) that you're respected enough by your peers for them to want to learn from you. However, access to order, or even view which products are for sale, could require a simple password based on common knowledge of magicians. For example, John George at www.johngeorge.com asks for the name of "The Professor" and the other name of Eric Weiss before one may get info on the video that he has for sale. :)
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Postby Necromancer » 07/14/03 11:26 AM

On my own site (www.necromancerevents.com), access to the products section is guarded by the password, which is "the name of "Annemann's landmark periodical devoted mostly to mentalism."

Per Doug's point, it's enough information to keep clients out and preserve the mystery.

But it's also enough information to keep some magic hobbyists out, sad to say. You'd be surprised how many on the magic discussion boards have privately emailed me for the answer. Sigh.
Neil Tobin, Necromancer
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Postby Chris Aguilar » 07/14/03 11:43 AM

Originally posted by MJ Marrs:
However, access to order, or even view which products are for sale, could require a simple password based on common knowledge of magicians.
Good idea. I believe Ian Rowland does just that on his site. He has a "magicians only" page which asks you for some information before you access it. Works quite well for him since he also sells items that are unrelated to magic.
_______________________________________________________
www.conjurenation.com - "Cards Only" Forums
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Postby Guest » 07/15/03 12:18 AM

I believe a section 'for magicians' guarded with a password is better than to show all your wonderful (cheap) products to all your wonderful clients who would think that it is so easy and cheap to become a magician. 'Hey, next time I buy one of these and be the magician myself. Why spend all the money on a magician from the phone book?'

So it's a good thing to have a separate section just for magicians. It also looks more professional because it shows clients that you also do have something for fellow magicians, something of interest for the 'real pros'. (If they knew of all the drawers full of products that were of interest once ... :-) ) But that they will never see.

Cheers,
Harry
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Postby Guest » 07/15/03 10:21 AM

Doug,

I think you are being a bit sensitive about some of the comments here, but you solicited others critique. Perhaps you were not ready to hear other magician's opinions...

BUT, since you did ask, I wasn't too fond of this quote on your web site...

"I perform 3 different 15-20 minute sets every hour (as opposed to some magicians who just repeat the same 3 tricks all night long.) After each set, I break for a few minutes and then draw a new crowd. This means I'm able to entertain over 100 people every hour (compare this with a strolling magician who might reach 50 people per hour... also: when 'strolling', an entertainer runs the risk of interrupting a social interaction or worse, a business discussion!)"

I can understand the selling point by using a comparison of your style versus other magicians, but would a lay person really see it as a perk in hiring you over someone else? I mean, aren't they hiring you specifically to entertain guests? Would they want to pay money for a service they thought people wouldn't be interested in anyhow?

It just struck me as a bit, oh I don't know, a tad harsh toward strolling magicians... I mean, do the lay public hate walkaround magic? In my years of experience, I don't think so... Some folks don't want to walk over and stand at a table for 20 mins. Some folks want to hang out at their table. It becomes an intimate, "special" performance for each group in my opinion, and I have had much luck in performing in this venue. With that said, I'm very happy for you to have a hook that works for you. I guess that is your special selling point, and I'm happy if it works for you, I was just a bit surprised at the wording.

As for the magic products being for sale in a common area of the site, I have to agree with the other folks here, that it would appear much more impressive to prospective clients to have a "Magician's Only" section. It creates more mystery, and most likely respect knowing that you sell secrets for $10-$25...

Just my opinion, but I do like the overall design, so best of luck to you and all you do!

Again Best-
Jeff
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Postby Guest » 07/15/03 03:54 PM

>I think you are being a bit sensitive

Didn't mean to come across that way... hope no-one was offended (not even sure what I was sensitive about!)

Re: Stationary/Strolling
>would a lay person really see it as a
>perk in hiring you over someone else?

I think so (just my opinion.)

Re: Selling yourself
Apparently the sales/wording on my site was a bit strong for your tastes... sorry about that... was just stating the facts (as I see em.)

thanks for the opinions and thoughts,
Doug Conn (semi-ex-stroller.)

www.dougconn.com
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Postby Jon Racherbaumer » 07/15/03 10:00 PM

My stance on strolling magic in some quarters is well-established. My initial, hard-line screed published in MAGIC was purposely worded and designed to create vigorous discourse and incite intelligent discourse.

There is room for debate and one must be prepared to exercise what I call "creative flexibility."

When I've done events in the past, I explain to the client or sponsor that 65-70% of my performance must be stationary--not only to establish my credentials and permit spectators to VOLUNTARILY enter my arena and "space," but to establish my IDENTITY as an invited, fully sponsored professional.

These stationary performances (5-8 times during the night)usually ensures that 75 % of the audience has at least seen "something."

When this is done, I then mingle on an individual basis throughout the room, mostly talking to individuals and cordially saying, "I hope you've had an interesting and enjoyable evening." If they appear to want "more," I then perform a few tricks for them. By the this time, they know who I am and more or less have invited me into their private zones.

There is nothing unbidden or intrusive.

The key is to use your head, analyze each venue, and then maximize your strengths and "presence."

This is not the same as "trolling for attention"...or, worse, being "window dressing" or part of the general atmospherics.

A-hem...and, so...

Onward...
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Postby Ian Kendall » 07/16/03 08:49 AM

Doug,

I've had a quick trawl through your site and had a look at one of the clips. I lost count of the grammatical errors on the Services page, but I'm a bit of a pedant.

The fixed position sounds interesting. Has anyone called you on the fact that you could only reach 15 people an hour? :)

Comments: ask and ye shall receive.

Take care, Ian
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Postby Guest » 07/16/03 10:40 AM

I know I have some serious weaknesses w/ proper grammar; If I have one regret in my studious endeavors, its not paying more attention in english class (I had Paul Harris books open instead.) If anyone wants to help a guy out & count/record the errors (as laborious as it may be) I'll be happy to fix them all.

In the meantime, my "list of things to do" contains: Improve Grammar / English skills

Re: 15 people.
Nope; no one has ever questioned that (perhaps because it doesn't happen.) Nor do they question that I can reach 150+ people an hour, which is closer to the norm. :)

Regards,
Doug Conn
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Postby Guest » 07/16/03 10:55 AM

nix that request for help...

I just opened my email to find my request had been met before I made it (thanks Rock!)

Interested parties may wish to check out the new prose... or not.

Regards,
Doug Conn
www.dougconn.com
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Postby Guest » 08/19/03 07:24 AM

I'd love some feedback on my site http://www.watchmagic.com

Thanks,
Oz
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Postby Guest » 08/19/03 01:43 PM

Great site Oz. One additional area you may want to think about is regarding lectures (for SAM, IBM, etc.). Especially if you provided advanced notice when you'd be in different parts of the country, would help folks to line you up for local lectures.
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Postby Guest » 08/21/03 12:28 PM

Originally posted by Jon Racherbaumer:
My stance on strolling magic in some quarters is well-established. My initial, hard-line screed published in MAGIC was purposely worded and designed to create vigorous discourse and incite intelligent discourse.

There is room for debate and one must be prepared to exercise what I call "creative flexibility."

When I've done events in the past, I explain to the client or sponsor that 65-70% of my performance must be stationary--not only to establish my credentials and permit spectators to VOLUNTARILY enter my arena and "space," but to establish my IDENTITY as an invited, fully sponsored professional.

These stationary performances (5-8 times during the night)usually ensures that 75 % of the audience has at least seen "something."

When this is done, I then mingle on an individual basis throughout the room, mostly talking to individuals and cordially saying, "I hope you've had an interesting and enjoyable evening." If they appear to want "more," I then perform a few tricks for them. By the this time, they know who I am and more or less have invited me into their private zones.

There is nothing unbidden or intrusive.

The key is to use your head, analyze each venue, and then maximize your strengths and "presence."

This is not the same as "trolling for attention"...or, worse, being "window dressing" or part of the general atmospherics.

A-hem...and, so...

Onward...
Jon,

Respectfully, I disagree with a couple of your points. I've only been in the biz about 30 years and worked with Heba Haba Al, Tony Andruzzi, Jeff McBride and a few others as a pro, so my viewpoint might be a bit on the inexperienced side. ;)

In many instances, when booked to entertain, a magician will be required to go from table to table as part of the contract. If the magician disagrees and will not do this, he or she does not work that event.

And, in all probability, won't work much for that agent, party planner, etc., either.

That's an economic reality I have had to adapt to over the years.

Creative flexibility works both ways - the talent has to be creative in meeting the CLIENT'S needs if the magician wants to work.

While there should be some give and take, this is often, IME, not what happens. The agent and/or client want what they want. If the contacted magician does not want to provide that, then the booking entity will find another magician.

In their minds, magicians are a dime a dozen.

IF you can get the formal, fixed position deal - great! I always go for that, but rarely get it because the booking entities that I work with want to use magic as an interactive ice-breaking vehicle.

A formal close-up gig is, to me, a dream gig. I love doing them. But to think that a crowd of 400 is going to come over to watch you during a pre-banquet cocktail hour is asking a lot of the audience, frankly.

It all comes down to the booker and their expectations and what I am and am not willing to do.

And when it comes down to it, I like working, so I tend to flex.

It's been my experience that most of the full time close up guys do as well - and for the reasons I have stated, as well as a few of their own, I bet.

No flame, honest. Just a different view of what it takes to keep working.

We all do what works best for us. Being flexible to the client's needs is what works best for me.

Loved the book on Marlo at Treasure Chest, BTW! I was the guy who took over after he left the dump back in the early '70's.

Kind regards,

Lee Darrow, C.Ht.
http://www.leedarrow.com
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Postby Tim David » 09/03/03 10:39 PM

Usually I'm a lurker, but I feel the need to respond to this thread...

I have been very actively studying and testing online marketing strategies over the past four years. I have found a LOT of mis-information going around, especially among service-based businesses (like magicians).

Search engines are a very effective way to bring in gigs. In fact, out of the 2-5 magic gigs I get online every week, a good chunk of them come from search engines.

However, meta tags are not worth worrying about because the search engines don't even consider them anymore. There are other techniques that are far more effective.

In fact, I share my entire 4-step search engine strategy (which has gotten me top 5 rankings in Yahoo, Google, and Alta Vista for the search term "magic kit for children") in my free 5-day minicourse:

http://www.webdesignforentertainers.com/minicourse.html

Why is it free? Very simply, there are way too many sucky magic web sites out there. People are teaching the wrong things and if you follow the advice of the so-called "gurus" and "experts" then you're going to end up losing money.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news about the meta tags,

Tim David
http://www.webdesignforentertainers.com/minicourse.html
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Postby Q. Kumber » 04/24/11 08:24 AM

Here's a unique strategy for getting bookings. Have videos of Bill Malone on your site: http://www.daniellyons.co.uk/id16.html
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Postby Dusty » 05/06/11 10:24 AM

I have to agree with Doug's earlier post. I for one don't want visitors to my site to have any idea that I offer my routines for sale to other performers. I hope they believe that my performance is unique and not something they can get from another performer, possibly cheaper!

I will agree that a password protected "magicians Only" link will stop visitors getting any further, but I don't want them to be distracted from the purpose of the site which it simply to promote my acts and get me bookings. To confirm this my sig block link below is not available outside of magic forums but is password protected in case it is picked up elsewhere.

I remember many years ago, Yellow Pages sent out "Find me in Yellow Pages" stickers for subscribers to put on their vehicles, for me this is insane, why would you want them to be exposed to another 10 providers along with your information.
regards,
Dusty aka Max Gordon
Original publications at:
http://solutions.yolasite.com/
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