Contracts for Magicians

Post topics about the business side of magic.

Postby Guest » 11/24/05 05:17 PM

Is there a good source of contract templates for various types of magic gigs: close-up, strolling, trade show, birthday parties, restaurant, etc.?
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 11/25/05 11:42 PM

Hi,

I know that the Kirk Charles book on restaurant and walk-around magic has a good sample, and there are others as well. Just type in this and modify to fit what you need.

Blessings,

Bob Phillips
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 11/26/05 05:27 AM

Try and find a copy of Jim Kleefeld's "The Contract Book". I found this to be a good resource.
Guest
 

Postby Jon Elion » 11/27/05 09:14 AM

The contract used by Paul Green is superb! It is written in simple plain English, and is brief, professional, and complete. I'll bet if you contacted him and asked sweetly he might steer you in the right direction. He frequents this BBS (and is listed in the Directory). Alas, his membership number here exceeds the ideal number by one, but other than that, he's a great guy!
Jon Elion
 
Posts: 136
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Wakefield, RI

Postby Paul Green » 11/27/05 10:59 AM

Hi Jon,

Thanks so much for your very kind words. I hope you and your family are well and that the holidays we are about to experieince are just fantastic.

My "contract" is actually a letter of intent and is designed for private parties, hospitality suites, etc. I do use a more formalized contract for high money gigs--Trade Shows, Product Launches, etc.

It has worked for me.

Warmest regards,

Paul Green :D :D :D
Paul Green
 
Posts: 292
Joined: 03/15/08 08:29 PM
Location: California

Postby Paul Green » 11/27/05 11:01 AM

Originally posted by Paul Green:
Hi Jon,

Thanks so much for your very kind words. I hope you and your family are well and that the holidays we are about to experience are just fantastic.

My "contract" is actually a letter of intent and is designed for private parties, hospitality suites, etc. I do use a more formalized contract for high money gigs--Trade Shows, Product Launches, etc.

It has worked for me.

Warmest regards,

Paul Green :D :D :D
Paul Green
 
Posts: 292
Joined: 03/15/08 08:29 PM
Location: California

Postby Paul Green » 11/27/05 11:02 AM

Sorry for the double posting
Paul Green
 
Posts: 292
Joined: 03/15/08 08:29 PM
Location: California

Postby Umpa Duze » 11/27/05 10:43 PM

The Contract book can be found at Abebooks. I tried it and the current link is below. I do not know how long the link will work, but you can just go to the home page and type in the search info.

http://dogbert.abebooks.com/servlet/Sea ... t+Book&x=0

Cheers,
Eric
Cheers,
Umpa Duze
Umpa Duze
 
Posts: 183
Joined: 06/05/08 08:27 PM
Location: Humboldt County CA

Postby David Acer » 11/29/05 09:21 AM

You can also find a variety of sample contracts in Secrets of Success for Magicians and Stage Hypnotists, by Wayne Lee and Sheldon Casavant (2003). Check it out at www.magicmarketingtools.com
Now tweeting daily from @David_Acer
David Acer
 
Posts: 733
Joined: 02/09/08 01:00 PM
Location: Montreal, Canada

Postby Guest » 12/13/05 09:38 PM

The contract book by Jim Kleefield (not sure of spelling) had loads of sample contracts. You could take the best parts of each & form a contract that worked for you.

This had to come out about 15 years ago but It was great & is worth checking
Guest
 

Postby Jeffrey Cowan » 12/21/05 11:22 AM

Using a "cut and paste" approach without more is a recipe for problems, regrets and not getting paid.

Do the smart thing: take your draft contract to an experienced lawyer in your home state (preferably AV rated) and have him/her review it and supplement it. For less than $500 in most instances, you'll end up with a contract that reflects your jurisdiction's law on contracts (it varies in each of the 50 states) and has all or most of the "bells and whistles" that will protect you fully or give you an upper hand in resolving disputes that may arise down the road.

I've seen contracts that working professionals had been using that were not written by a lawyer, and they all needed substantial revising to ensure that the magician was really protected.

Remember: the cost is a tax deductible business expense. It's also less than most spend on new tricks/dvds/toys in a short period of time. If you are making any kind of decent income from magic, it would be foolish to cut corners here.
-- Jeffrey Cowan
www.cowan-law.com
Jeffrey Cowan
 
Posts: 188
Joined: 01/17/08 01:00 PM
Location: Santa Monica, CA

Postby Sean Macfarlane » 12/21/05 11:42 AM

Best advice on contracts I've ever heard!
Sean Macfarlane
 
Posts: 201
Joined: 04/04/08 01:26 PM

Postby Eric Rose » 12/21/05 02:20 PM

Originally posted by Jeffrey Cowan:


Do the smart thing: take your draft contract to an experienced lawyer in your home state (preferably AV rated) and have him/her review it and supplement it. For less than $500 in most instances, you'll end up with a contract that reflects your jurisdiction's law on contracts (it varies in each of the 50 states) and has all or most of the "bells and whistles" that will protect you fully or give you an upper hand in resolving disputes that may arise down the road.

If you are making any kind of decent income from magic, it would be foolish to cut corners here.
Amen, brother! On top of that, a well-written contract is a good selling tool because you can show the client that it protects him, too.
Eric Rose
 
Posts: 245
Joined: 02/08/08 01:00 PM
Location: Franklin, Indiana

Postby Guest » 12/27/05 02:33 PM

My answer to contracts is to avoid booking myself. I try to stick strictly to subcontracting through various party planners. A good party planner will provide you and the client with the contract. I didn't get into magic so I could hustle work. I'm pretty lazy when it comes to anything but actualy performing. I do keep a contract form that I had drawn up by a lawyer friend of mine, but I have yet to actualy use it. There are several things you want fairly clearly spelled out. Performance location, Last date of cancelation, penalty for cancelation,the specifics of the gig (theme, time, date, etc.)I agree with haveing it checked out by a lawyer, but they aren't the most complicated things in the world.
Drew Heyen, Magician
Guest
 


Return to Marketing & Magic Business