Book Test questions (mother of all book tests, pegasus test, Mother's Companion)

Instead of mentally projecting your mentalism thoughts, type them here.

Postby Guest » 08/14/07 09:15 PM

If someone can help answer these questions I'd really appreciate it.

Can someone tell me the difference between the Pegasus Page effect and Ted Lesley's version called "Sough of Horses Wings" in his book Paramiracles. I'm thinking about purchasing the book but would like to know the main differences in the effects first. They are supposed to be similar.

I already do the Mother of all Book Tests, but I heard of something called "mothers companion" that is supposed to compliment MOBT well, has anyone heard of "mother's companion" if so, where is it and what is it? thanks!

Daniel
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Postby Guest » 08/15/07 12:46 AM

The Sough of Horses Wings in Paramiracles is Ted Lesley's handling of Arthur Emerson's Pegasus Page .

The Mother's Home Companion is Richard Busch's thoughts and handling of MOABT and you can find full details on his website http://www.RichardBusch.com
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Postby Guest » 08/15/07 01:09 PM

If you were asked about the other 100 available book tests what would your answer be? Would you buy them also? In other words is there a perfect book test? The obvious answer should be no because if there was we would all be doing the same book test. The conclusion is we should all be doingthe one that we feel is the best for us. There'sno need to test them all or to get the urge to buy every new one that advertises to be the best and the newest.
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Postby Guest » 08/15/07 11:24 PM

Quentin, thanks very much! I'm asking what the specific differences in the effect are though...do you know the differences with the Lesley version? I've heard it's more powerful..but i'm wondering what he changed? I'm just curious.

And BERMINI, that's a great point. I know there's not a perfect book test. However I think it's smart and professional to know as many of the different methods as you can to increase your knowledge as a Magician.

Daniel
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Postby Guest » 08/16/07 12:36 AM

In the Lesley version a page looked at in a book - is later found to be missing and found in an envelope previously found empty and sealed shut by a spectator who keeps it in his possession.
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Postby Guest » 08/19/07 06:34 AM

Quentin's reply reminds me of 'The Wizard's Manual', which also has the spectator's chosen word found on a page which has mysteriously been torn from the book. I always get great reactions with this, usually a cross between stunned disbelief and hysterical laughter. If you haven't got it, get it!
Regards
Adrian Solon
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Postby Guest » 09/18/07 12:09 AM

The differences between "Pegasus Page" and "The Sough of Horses' Wings" are as follows:

In the original Pegasus Page, the spectator had a choice of one of three books. The title of the book was written on a "whiteboard." Next, the spectator looked at a page in the chosen book and the page number was written down on a second "whiteboard." The two boards were placed together and given to a spectator to hold.

There was a bit of patter. The spectator imagined tearing that page out of the book. When the spectator opened the book, the page was torn out. It was found between the two boards. It's a strong effect. However, the book could not be left in the spectator's hands and needed to be collected fairly quickly.

In "The Sough of Horse's Wings," only one book is used. The spectator is allowed to look into an envelope. It is seen to be empty. The spectator then seals it -- it is self sealing. The spectator retains the envelope.

Now the book is shown. The spectator looks at one of the pages in the book and remembers the number. She then takes the book and holds onto it.

The spectator imagines the page being torn out of the book. She looks at the page in the book, and about a third or more of it is missing. She cuts the envelope open and there is the missing piece. The spectator may keep the book, if desired.

The chief advantages of the Lesley version over the original is that the whiteboards were somewhat contrived, but they were necessary. They were well disguised, though. The props are basically commonplace. And the book is examinable after the routine is over.

The chief disadvantage of the Lesley version is that you have to prepare an envelope for each performance. The Teleport Envelopes are no longer available from Ted. However, they are quite easy to make.

The entire method is in Paramiracles, which you should have if you are serious about mentalism.

Mother's Home Companion gives a number of different ways of handling the main technical problem with MOABT.
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Postby Dick Christian » 08/19/08 03:26 PM

As one who has more than a passing familiarity with book tests (I have about 400 of them in my personal collection and another 500-600 in various books, magazines, manuscripts, etc. in my personal library) and is 5+ years into compiling what I hope will be the first encyclopedic reference work on the history and evolution of forcing books and book tests (with a goal of publication by early 2011) I can safely say that there is no single "perfect" book test. I estimate that at least 2,000-2,500 -- and maybe twice that number -- have been published in English alone since 1900. There are some very good ones, a great many bad to mediocre ones and an awful lot of "highly derivative" ones (that's the polite term for knock-offs). Which book test, if any, is suitable for a particular performer is a matter of personal style, stage persona and preference. IMO (and you will find that I am, if anything, opinionated) book tests are for mentalists (and even then are best reserved for the more experienced ones) and, like most mentalism, have no place in a "magic" act. "Mental Magic" okay, "Mental-ISM" no-no (if you don't know the difference, you're probably not ready for mentalism.)

As specifically re: Art Emerson's "Pegasus Page" (1965) and Ted Lesley's "Sough of Horse's Wings" (1992) both can be traced to Corinda's "Zarkamorta II (The Ceremony of Reincarnation" (1960s) which in turn was likely insprired by Annemann's "Whim of Tituba" (1939). The theme was then picked up again by Docc Hilford in his "Brother Of All Book Tests" (1995) and repeated in his later "Wizard's Manual" (which is the same as BOABT, but uses a different book). The UK's Iain Dunford's "Hateful Page" (2007) adds a novel and potentially comedic twist to the theme of the "resurrected page."
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Postby Dick Christian » 08/19/08 05:55 PM

I just realized that in my discussion of Art Emerson's "Pegasus Page" and other "resurrected page" book tests I inadvertently failed to mention "To Hell and Back" by England's Roy Johnson (1995) which is a variation on his earlier "Hellfire 1 and 2" and Tony Binarelli's "The Page of the Book Act" (2000) all of which also use this theme.

It is also possible that there are others that I have not yet discovered in my research, so if anyone is aware of any such I'd appreciate your bringing them to my attention.
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Postby Steve Bryant » 08/19/08 10:54 PM

Don't overlook "The Trick Without a Name," by Sid Fleischman, in J.G. Thompson, Jr's MY BEST (1945). Later, writing as Carl March, Sid also published it in MAGIC MADE EASY (1953). Spec selects a page, signs his name. Page is torn out and burned, signature still visible. Page appears back in magazine, still with signature.
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Postby Dick Christian » 08/20/08 08:50 AM

Steve,

You are absolutely correct. "The Trick Without a Name" is one of three book tests found in Thompson's MY BEST. The Thompson book is just one of a large stack of books and magazines that I am slowly working my way through as I cull book tests for inclusion in the Encyclopedia I am compiling.

Thanks for bringing it to my, and everyone's, attention.

For others who are following this topic, you can greatly assist me in my research by reminding me of book tests that you are aware of so that I can be sure that they receive appropriate mention in the Encyclopedia. I would much rather hear about 100 that I already know than miss one that I hadn't known about.
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