centre tear

Instead of mentally projecting your mentalism thoughts, type them here.

Postby Guest » 07/26/03 04:21 AM

can anyone tell me where to find a good description of the centre tear? and if you know of many, which do you feel is the most complete and best-described?
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Postby Roy McIlwee » 07/26/03 08:51 AM

Malcolm, Check out Richard Osterlind's "The Surrounded Slow-Motion Center Tear...And Other Techniques. My wife and I saw Richard do this effect many years ago and she still says that was the purest form of magic she had ever seen!!!(That's not saying much about me!!). Good luck, Roy McIlwee.
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Postby Jim Sisti » 07/26/03 10:15 AM

I would be remiss if I didn't mention that, though the "Slow-Motion" book is out of print (and has been for some time due to our friend in Idaho's incompetence), Richard's new book on his center tear, "The Perfected Center Tear and Other Assorted Routines," is at the printer now and should be available within 3 weeks or so.

It has all new illustrations and ten years of additional touches on what many consider to be the cleanest "rip and read" style center tear ever.

Keep an eye on the Osterlind Mysteries site for more info.
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Postby Dr Adrian Solon » 07/28/03 05:27 AM

Richard Busch's book 'Peek Performances' has a lot of info about center and off-center tears, amongst much other very good stuff. Recommended.
Regards
Adrian Solon
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Postby Guest » 07/28/03 01:30 PM

Lee Earle's Teach-In video is pretty good and Docc Hilford did an audio tape/book combo on it that had some very innovative ideas as well.

Corinda's 13 Steps to Mentalism has an excellent section and Karrel Fox's "Another Book" has some interesting work on the technique as well.

Kind regards,

Lee Darrow, C.Ht.
http://www.leedarrow.com
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Postby Guest » 07/28/03 01:32 PM

Another method to toss into the fray: Check out the Al Baker center tear in "Mental Magic." You can find this nifty tear in the "Secret Ways of Al Baker" by the Miracle Factory. While I'm sure that there are many other versions that do this, Bakers method allows you to read the message in the act of tearing up the paper, thus no need to fumble with the extra bit.

Zech Johnson
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Postby Jeremy Greystoke » 07/28/03 06:38 PM

The Baker technique is well worth studying, since a number of more contemporary approaches use it as a basis. The Osterlind tear is excellent, and Bruce Bernstein has some work that's definitely worthy. My favorite "steal-away" centre tear is the Al Koran handling that's taught in Miller's "Professional Presentations".

And, of course, the wonderful "Mind, Myth, and Magick" by T. A. Waters has a wealth of information about this beloved technique.

Jeremy
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Postby Guest » 07/29/03 05:00 PM

I find it funny that everything posted has been about "technique", something that can be found on the back of cereal boxes if you look hard enough. Many also opt for a non-centre tear steal, wallets, shiners and various other methods to gain the information. Richard Busch's "Peek Performances" will show you many alternative methods to peek at the information and Al Mann's "The Purloined Thought" contains many "read as you tear" methods and has Osterlind's in there as well however:

Method is only HALF the rquation here. The second half and the area that so many fail in is the revelation of the information. If you simply hand them back the info, it is obvious that you gained it smehow BUT if you were to reveal it piece by pece and some information that they did not reveal, you are in deed a miracle worker. I highly suggest that you read T.a. Waters essay as well as Ted Lesley's "Discertation on the centre tear" from "Paramiracles" if you wish to know how to elevate this into miracle class. I beleive that Banachek also touches on the information revelation in his "Psychological Subtelties".

PSIncerely Yours,
Paul Alberstat
AB Stagecraft
http://www.mindguy.com/store
Unique Mentalism World-wide
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Postby Guest » 08/01/03 01:13 AM

Paul raises an interesting point about the revelation of the information involved. The centre tear routine I currently use owes a large debt to T.A. Waters as well as some ideas from Derren Brown's Absolute magic. I leave it here for your parousal.

The routine is for two sitters. Each person is asked to write something associated with their childhood on the paper. one sitter then mixes both papers untill neither can be deistinguished from the other. One paper is selected and the other is torn up (centre tear). The untorn paper is not touched but rather palced under a glass, ashtray...whatever. The game is to determine whose memory is written on the untorn paper, but what you infact do is begin to cold read (warm read I guess) around the glimpsed information from the centre tear. One spectator will begin to react, and you make it clear that you are reading her. After the reading, during which time you have assigned the correct memory to the correct spectator, you open the slip which has untill now remain untouched and miscall it as the previously glimpsed memory. You do not read the first memory compleately accurately, remember, you're only trying to assign it to the correct spectator, so when you're a little off, you have a reason to open the second slip. you are now one ahead and can tear up the second slip as it is now a useless piece of trash. And now what....? You just wait. The second sitter will invariably ask you to read them as well and you say , "well gee, I don't usually do this twice in one night but you're awfully cute so i guess I can try, but maybee it wont even work. And you're now set to give an amazingly accurate, semingly impromptu reading.

Bruce Bernstien notes in his Booklet on the centre tear that the move was originally used in this way to give uncanilly accurate readings.

Paul also mentioned Psychological subtleties. For anyone who uses the centre tear to do the old divine a word from a square of newspaper thing, Banacheck's psychological convincers for the revelation of a single word are a must.
Jer.
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Postby Bill Cushman » 08/01/03 08:55 PM

I find getting the theme of what was written plays more strongly, perhaps more real(?), than revealing the word itself. And, as per Lesley, et.al., to incorporate this theme into a brief cold reading is the most powerful of all in my experience.

Back to technique for a moment: My favorite instant access tears are Busch's Zen Tear from Peek Performances and Scatter Thought by Richard Stride and Alan Wassilak. I know many of you are familiar with the former, but has anyone else had the pleasure of learning Scatter Thought? It has some similarities to Earle's in the Teach In Video, but is superior in my opinion. I find the handling more natural and the angles much less restrictive.
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Postby Kamus » 08/10/03 10:12 AM

I have to agree with the Corinda recommendation. Very thorough treatment and the approach I use to this day. Lee Earle's method is also very good but requires a little more work in the hands. Corinda covers the psychology of the presentation in a way that allows the performer to relax in his presentation.
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Postby Guest » 08/15/03 08:11 AM

Gentlemen,

This postings is to clear up some misinformation about my center tear. My original method, which Paul Alberstat refers to, was called THE ULTIMATE CENTER TEAR. It appeared in Al Mann's materials and later in THE PURLOINED THOUGHT. I next invented and described the working of THE SLOW-MOTION SURROUNDED CENTER TEAR which appeared in the book of the same name. That title has been unavailable (through no fault of my own) for many years. New developments, with the great help of Jim Sisti, have relegated that matter to a thing of the past.

The version that Roy McIlwee saw me perform and referred to in his earlier posting is my new PERFECTED CENTER TEAR and that has NEVER been published before. This is the exact method I finally developed, settled on and have been using in my professional shows for many years. As Roy will tell you, there was never anything lacking in the presentation and all those performing aspects are covered in my new book THE PERFECTED CENTER TEAR AND ASSORTED ROUTINES. Special consideration was given to the thoughts of T.A Waters and Ted Lesley's work in PARAMIRACLES. The book also contains updated, improved material that originally appeared in SMSCT as well as some new thoughts about billet switching, the nail writer and a chapter of off-beat items I call "weird ones." To put the finishing touch on the book, we added a bonus chapter containing my original (and still very usable) ULTIMATE CENTER TEAR with corrections and new illustrations by artist Shaun Robison.

This book has been many years in the making and we have done our best to make it full of practical material with no "fluff" . Information on the current status of this new book will be on our website www.osterlindmysteries.com within 48 hours from this posting. To say I am excited about this is a huge understatement.

Richard Osterlind
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Postby Guest » 08/17/03 06:19 PM

What about your DVD's ?

Nimrod
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Postby Guest » 08/18/03 03:20 AM

The DVD's should be out in before the end of the summer, or sooner.

Richard
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Postby Guest » 08/19/03 07:50 PM

And may I add my .02 regarding the Osterlind Slo-Mo SUrrounded Center Tear.

I have been using this in my mentalism for the last 8 years. The one "complaint" I've heard about this tear is "what if the writing is illegible, then you have to monkey around trying to read it". Well, I've never had that problem, and there is plenty of time during the tear to read the writing, even if it's upside down and backwards.

I love the tear, and doubt I'd switch to any other one.

Getting off the soapbox, ;)

DonB!
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Postby Guest » 08/21/03 11:59 AM

Originally posted by DonB:
And may I add my .02 regarding the Osterlind Slo-Mo SUrrounded Center Tear.

I have been using this in my mentalism for the last 8 years. The one "complaint" I've heard about this tear is "what if the writing is illegible, then you have to monkey around trying to read it". Well, I've never had that problem, and there is plenty of time during the tear to read the writing, even if it's upside down and backwards.

I love the tear, and doubt I'd switch to any other one.

Getting off the soapbox, ;)
DonB!
Here's a tip for the center tear - when asking the person to put the info on the slip, tell them to PRINT it and show it to one other person at the table or on stage.

This way, you have covered two problems that happen with the CT - illegible writing and a person who lies about what they wrote.

In the issue of my stuff in New Invocation (1989 sometime, IIRC), the effect Thrice Drawn Circle gives a spooky presentation about Witches and Magic Circles that also justifies the drawing of the circle on the slip AND the reason for showing the writing to the other person.

Just a plug, even if our Esteemed Editor did miss me as a contributor in the Index!

S'okay, Richard, it can happen to anybody! :D

Lee Darrow, C.Ht.
http://www.leedarrow.com
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Postby David Rowyn » 09/03/03 08:38 PM

Barrie Richardson has some wonderful center tear handlings. One can be found in Theater of the Mind under the title, Center Shtick. The other is what I like to call the 'Centerless Tear'. Barrie shared this with me a couple of years ago so I'm not sure if he's since published or titled it, but it is one of the most elegant handlings for the center tear - certainly worth seeking out. As i understand it, he demonstrates this on occasion in his recent lectures. It would be worth the price of the lecture for you if you are looking for a great center tear.
Last edited by David Rowyn on 02/16/14 06:12 PM, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Guest » 09/03/03 09:28 PM

I have richard's originals both in the Al Mann wonderful tome and in the Busby, updated from Mann, version. Never could learn it from books. Al Baler's original umbrella version was impossible. Bernstein's also eluded me, even with a few minutes of his private coaching. A version of a marvelous billet exchange (why not?) is --or was--available on DVD fromm England recently. Looking forward to Rich's newer version and may even buy his DVD ust to see it presented "live".
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Postby Guest » 09/25/03 04:29 PM

I love the Al Koran method described in his book.
It is so fast and casual. You don't need to look at your hands. Over in about 10 seconds.

It has to be the best of the lot except for one major drawback. Reading the billet. It doesn't have the advantages of all these methods where you can read the billet openly while tearing.You have to do it later somehow.

However, it is so good that I cannot bear to learn any other method. I am set in my ways.

I had an idea though. Untested, I admit. I think it would work. Slightly brazen but if you do not have the nerve of the devil you shouldn't be a mentalist anyway.

Display the various torn pieces in your left hand.
Ask the spectator to selct a piece and open it up.
You say that you will do the same. Of course you come over with your right hand with the stolen piece and pretend to remove it from the left hand. The illusion is perfect.
Open your piece flat out as you have asked the spectator to do. Ask the spectator to write a triangle or something metaphysical on the back of his piece. While he is doing this it is a very easy matter to glimpse the info on your piece by simply turning it casually toward yourself. It is opened out flat anyway.
Now remove the pen from the spectator and draw a triangle yourself on your piece. I am sure you can come up with some twaddle about "minds in sympathy" or something.
Now tear up your piece and ask the spectator to do likewise. Don't worry about the illogicality of tearing again. A good showman can always come up with some excuse for this if he thinks he needs it.
Put all the pieces into your left hand and now you have the info.
Proceed now how you want.

This sounds good. I have talked myself into actually trying out my own idea on some real people.
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Postby Guest » 10/02/03 04:47 AM

any opinions on jack avis method as detailed on page 267 of the book "ahead of the pack"
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Postby Steve Bryant » 10/02/03 06:34 AM

I consider it quite the best I've ever seen. Period. If you set fire to the pieces with a match, at the end of the tearing, it gives you the opportunity to stare directly at what you need to see.
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Postby Guest » 10/12/03 03:35 PM

I have just got The Perfected Center Tear, and can reccommend it. It is very good.
There is some other routines in this book, among others a stunning addition to your book test

Sven
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Postby Guest » 10/17/03 07:02 AM

I'm a bit surprised to see that Jas Jakutsch's center tear technique has gone unmentioned. It's an extremely convincing and relatively easy glimpse-as-you-tear technique, the kind of work you would expect from the mind of Gary Kurtz. It can be found in his manuscript "Completely Mental", along with numerous applications and tips including very subtle one-ahead and cold reading techniques.
The series of three manuscripts has, possibly because of its limited distribution, been largely forgotten (or perhaps those who have the manuscripts have simply wanted to keep the "real work" to themselves). In any case, you can't go wrong with any of Jakutsch's work. There is also a billet routine in this series which would be very difficult to beat in terms of effect, if you have the chops for it. I've seen this series advertised on Joe Stevens' website, although I don't know if they're still available.
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Postby Guest » 10/19/03 01:31 AM

I would love to learn a center tear, but don't bother because I already have a three-billet, one-ahead routine. I feel that one use of billets per show is enough, don't you think?
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Postby Guest » 10/19/03 03:38 AM

Originally posted by David Groves:
I would love to learn a center tear, but don't bother because I already have a three-billet, one-ahead routine. I feel that one use of billets per show is enough, don't you think?
David,

One use of billets in a program can certainly be more than plenty, and you have a very nice routine, but a center tear is still a devastating weapon to add to your impromptu arsenal. In fact, after seeing you perform as much as I have, Im surprised the center tear isnt already part of your repertoire.

Ill echo that Busch, Jakutsch, Osterlind, Hilford and Bernstein all have great tears for when you need to peek as youre tearing. Im not as big a fan of Lee Earles tear because I think the handling looks odd, but I do like how he frames the writing space and I love the moment of his peek.

That said, lets not underestimate the basic handling that can be found in Corinda, Mark Wilsons Complete Course in Magic or the Klutz Book of Magic for that matter. Ted Lesley has a nice presentation of the basic handling on his L&L DVD and Salt Lakes Dan Paulus puts it to great use in his mentalism show.

I think the center tear is a lot like sponge balls, people arent crazy about them until they actually perform them and realize the impact they have on audiences.

Ray
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Postby Guest » 11/26/03 09:29 AM

PERFECTED CENTER TEAR IS WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR. ITS THE BEST RESOURCE FOR CENTER TEAR IF YOU HAVE ANY OTHER QUESTIONS PLEASE LET KNOW
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Postby Andrew » 11/30/03 06:24 PM

Let's be honest: a centre tear is nearly almost extinct as a means of finding secret information. The question is, as in every bit of illusion, "what would people really do?" what wold something really look like?" And the inescapable answer regarding center tear is that NOBODY TEARS anything. When is the last time you saw anybody tear anything before they through it away? People scrunch up a piece of paper into a little ball and toss it in the trash. Going from there, how do we extract that secret information from a rolled up wad of paper? Seems like we can't. So let's switch the premise for a tear: ask them to recall a childhood memory from winter. Tear up the paper and make "flakes" of paper shreds fall to the ground to enhance the winter theme. That's sort of crude but it seems more believable than pretending to "get rid" of their folded paper.
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Postby Guest » 12/01/03 08:31 AM

Nice idea, Andy.

The idea is that you do have to justify both the writing and the tearing and your routine does that beautifully.

Another idea might be the idea of remote viewing. A secret document has been generated and shows to an enemy agent. You, playing the US (or your home country for those of you who aren't from my neck of the woods, side of the pond, etc.) agent, uses his psychic ability to figure out what's on the page.

The enemy, having found out about your abilities, shreds their documents, adding a challenge layer to the whole concept.

You still triumph!

Could be done as a story, a demonstration of something you heard about and experimented with, or any number of variations.

With national security being so high in everyone's consciousness these days, this might play well, too.

Great idea on your part! Keep 'em coming!

Lee Darrow, C.Ht.
http://www.leedarrow.com
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Postby Andrew » 12/01/03 04:51 PM

Yes, the tearing ...justifying the tearing. Here's more: "I sense it's a word that conjures up a sad memory from your childhood -- a private scandal in the family, perhaps. It tore your family apart and it tears you up to this day [tear, tear, tear]....Oh, it's not that. It's a happy memory. I see. But there was some controversy...."
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Postby Jim Maloney_dup1 » 12/01/03 09:31 PM

Originally posted by andy:
And the inescapable answer regarding center tear is that NOBODY TEARS anything. When is the last time you saw anybody tear anything before they through it away?
Earlier today, when I did just that. I always tear paper up before I throw it away.

Also, instead of asking what someone would actually do (which is a valid question), you could ask "Why would I tear this up?" One quite simple reason is that you don't want to be accused of seeing what was written. After all, if the paper has been torn into little bits, how could you possibly have read what's on it. Incorporate that justification into your presentation, and you're all set. And that's just one possible answer.

-Jim
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Postby Guest » 09/01/04 02:53 PM

I do the Bernstien tear however I don't have the Ba**s to do it for an audience. My main concern with billets in general is when and how to glimpse. Any suggestions?
:genii:
nolamagic@bellsouth.net
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Postby Guest » 09/02/04 10:09 AM

There is a new book in the works by the amazing Barrie Richardson. It details his latest work on three billet techniques, including the finest center tear that currently exists.

Probably won't be out for a few months, but if you are serious about mentalism, you won't want to miss it.
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Postby Guest » 09/02/04 11:51 AM

Personally think the tearing looks a bit unnatural, and for that reason have begun working with Richard Busch's more recent book (after Peek Performances) in which the billet is folded up, held at the fingertips, and allows the info to be glimpsed. Spectator can then open up the billet afterwards and be none the wiser.

Just a personal preference.
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Postby Guest » 09/02/04 12:20 PM

When Richard Osterlind tears up the paper, it does not look unnatural.

He's mentioned on other forums and in his books that he implicitly and explicitly needs to "touch the paper" to get a psychic impression, while challenging the audience not to let him peek at it.

I haven't seen him mention this specific justification, but his body language and attitude seem to communicate the notion that, having "touched the paper" to get a Dead-Zone-like "impression" from it, it's no longer necessary. So he tears it up casually and absently while revealing the info. The tearing is natural because it's incidental, a sort of "I don't need this anymore" kinda deal.

I'm not sure if this is what he's actually doing or trying to do, but that's what it seems like on his DVDs.

In that regard, the tricky business appears to occur while you're holding the billet, head turned away. It helps, too, if you can start revealing info before you start tearing (deductively and/or with outright guesses).

By the way, for those who think challenging them to catch you peeking is "running when no one's chasing," you may be right. But they're gonna chase, at some point. I know the notion that "the suspicion of a peek shouldn't even enter their minds," but it's likely to enter their minds whether you want it to or not. In other words, if they don't think of a peek at that moment, they'll think of it later, when you're not around to refute it. Better to "front the problem" and address it during the presentation. That way, they'll remember how closely they watched you, and should they relate the story to others, will become your no-peek-advocate.
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Postby Tony Razzano » 09/02/04 07:22 PM

Originally posted by Scott Leavitt:
Personally think the tearing looks a bit unnatural, and for that reason have begun working with Richard Busch's more recent book (after Peek Performances) in which the billet is folded up, held at the fingertips, and allows the info to be glimpsed. Spectator can then open up the billet afterwards and be none the wiser.

Just a personal preference.
Scott,
The title of the book you mention is "Peek Encores". I agree, it is VERY good.
Best regards,
Tony Razzano
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Postby Guest » 09/03/04 10:35 AM

Originally posted by Avocat:
When Richard Osterlind tears up the paper, it does not look unnatural.

He's mentioned on other forums and in his books that he implicitly and explicitly needs to "touch the paper" to get a psychic impression, while challenging the audience not to let him peek at it.

I haven't seen him mention this specific justification, but his body language and attitude seem to communicate the notion that, having "touched the paper" to get a Dead-Zone-like "impression" from it, it's no longer necessary. So he tears it up casually and absently while revealing the info. The tearing is natural because it's incidental, a sort of "I don't need this anymore" kinda deal.

I'm not sure if this is what he's actually doing or trying to do, but that's what it seems like on his DVDs.

In that regard, the tricky business appears to occur while you're holding the billet, head turned away. It helps, too, if you can start revealing info before you start tearing (deductively and/or with outright guesses).

By the way, for those who think challenging them to catch you peeking is "running when no one's chasing," you may be right. But they're gonna chase, at some point. I know the notion that "the suspicion of a peek shouldn't even enter their minds," but it's likely to enter their minds whether you want it to or not. In other words, if they don't think of a peek at that moment, they'll think of it later, when you're not around to refute it. Better to "front the problem" and address it during the presentation. That way, they'll remember how closely they watched you, and should they relate the story to others, will become your no-peek-advocate.
Avocat,

Thank you for your post and you are very right about the mental attitude. I prefer not to try to explain the ESP processes I am supposedly demonstrating, but rather use that as a silent script. For instance, rather than say, "I will use clairvoyance to deduce what you just wrote" I prefer to take the paper and say, "I need to touch this for a moment." Then I handle the paper as though I were getting vibrations from it. Then, of course, the tear which silently is saying, "I don't need that now!"

Also, I should mention that "procedure" is not a bad thing. If you don't try to explain the "powers" you are demonstrating, but just act accordingly as though you have them, the audience cannot pick apart why you do this or that. It becomes just some necessity you need to do in order to accomplish your goal.

Just my thoughts.
Richard
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Postby Guest » 09/03/04 05:25 PM

The best center tear I seen that isnt a tear at all is in peek performance, the zorro billet. you dont even tear it. Also but if you want a tear, osterlind and the other billet tears in peek performance are good.
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Postby Guest » 09/03/04 08:36 PM

Someone mentione Lee earls Teach tapes he is now offering them on CD at http://www.lee-earle.com/esp/index.html and the asking price isn't that bad

Hope this helps

Ken
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Postby Jacky Kahan » 09/05/04 01:15 AM

Hello

Please find enclosed some references to the center tear..

In
The Stein and Day Handbook of Magic by Marvin Kaye
Page 116 Center Tear

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In
The Secret Ways of Al Baker
by Todd Karr
Chapter 2
New Light on the Center Tear
The Baker Method of Reading the Center Tear
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The First California Lecture
Dai Vernon
Page 9 Center Tear
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In
Elliot, Bruce: Magic as a Hobby (New Tricks for Amateur Performers)

Page?? Center Tear: Improved center tear by Graham, H.P.
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In
Hay, Henry: The Amateur Magician's Handbook , Third Edition
Page 287 4. The Stolen Center Ruse: center tear
centre tear
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In
Ogden, Tom: The Complete Idiot's Guide to Magic Tricks Page 250 The Center Tear: magician can discern message on paper written by spectator
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In
Wilson, Mark: Mark Wilson's Greatest Magic Tricks
Page?? The Center Tear
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Wilson, Mark: Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic Page 327 The Center Tear: message is torn and burnt, yet magician determines message
Page 329 The Center Tear "Standing" Variation: as above
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In
Tarbell, Harlan: The Tarbell Course in Magic Vol 5 Page 152 Dai Vernon's Mental Prediction: center tear steal
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In
Tarbell, Harlan: Tarbell's Course In Magic Volume 4 Page 248 The Quick and the Dead: Center tear approach, carbon paper, others
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In
Lorayne, Harry: Apocalypse Volumes 6-10
Page 1221 Center Tear Substitute (Kingdon Lieberman): a message on the back of a business card is mind read even though enclosed in a dollar bill
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In
Ted Lesley's Paramiracles
Page 93 Dissertation on the Center Tear
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In
Paul Curry's Worlds Beyond
Page 264 Center Tear Handling
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In
Corinda , 13 Steps to Mentalism
Page 166 The Centre Tear (Corinda Variation)
Page 171 The Centre Tear (Punx-Mier Variation)
Page 171 The Centre Tear (One Hand Variation)
Page 173 The Centre Tear (Corinda's "Backward" Variation)

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In
AL Mann's : The Tesseract
Chapter 3:
deals with "Another Chapter" about the center tear. The material in this chapter came to light after "the Apodosis" was printed. This chapter discloses a new and radically different approach to the presentation of the center tear effect. Here the center piece opens out almost automatically with little help from the performer and reveals not one but five full questions written by as many spectators. The chapter also shows a reproduction of Sid Lorraine's letter on notes on the center tear that were written in 1928 and are the first notes on record for the effect. It also shows a reproduction of Ovette's Mss. on the center tear which was first advertised in Sept. 1931 in the Sphinx almost a full year before Annemann released his version
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Al Mann's : The Purloined Thought
THE PURLOINED THOUGHT is a treatise on the history, methodology and technique on the use of torn billets in the mentalists art of thought reading. It starts with an in depth study of the history and evolution of the Center Tear and goes on to detail ...
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Al Mann's Mental Ettes
THE SANS TEAR CENTER METHOD (BILLETS)
THE UNSEEN TEAR
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Al Mann's The Bert Reese Docimasy
Reese and the center tear
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All Mann
The Apodosis
Included are effects using THE CENTER TEAR METHOD!


Hope this helps

Jacky
www.magicbooks.be
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Postby Doug Dyment » 09/05/04 07:30 AM

Note that Jacky's list of references, while certainly helpful, is exclusively one of older methods. It doesn't include any of the more recent (and notably improved) approaches, such as those by Bernstein, Stride, Osterlind, Richardson, Jakutsch, Hilford, and others (nor, obviously, the unpublished ones).

Also, many current performers use peeks instead of tears.

... Doug
... Doug :: Proprietor of The Deceptionary
Doug Dyment
 
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