"Watch and Wear"

Instead of mentally projecting your mentalism thoughts, type them here.

Postby Guest » 11/30/03 10:09 AM

I'm a little anxious about the "Watch and Wear" I recently purchased on line. The advertising claim is a spectator can hold it in his hand after you set the watch to a predicted time. Have I set myself up for disappointment?
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Postby Guest » 11/30/03 05:50 PM

WAW is one of the best tricks you can have in your repertoire. You have not wasted your money.

I don't manufacture this stuff or know the guys who do. I just use it all the time.

You have to watch yourself, though, because it's not an automatic trick. There are a couple of challenges with this trick:

1. You have to wait for the watch to travel to the named time. In order to pull this off, you have to patter in a natural manner or people will know in their bones that you're stalling. If the time on the watch is 11 hours off the named time, you have to use outs; to do otherwise just tips it.

2. Uncooperative audiences. You ask someone to think of a time, set the time on your watch, and then ask them to name their time while you're holding the watch. Sometimes, a smartass audience member will retort: "No, you tell me what time you have."

You can answer: "I'm committed here; I've set a time. Tell me what time you've thought of."

But if they're [censored] enough, sometimes they won't yield. Usually, an exchange like this happens in a closeup situation; in stage situations, their stage fright usually stops them from being so determined to mess you up.

In such rare cases, I simply thank them for their time and walk away. That is such a satisfying feeling!

3. Outs. Establishing outs is essential for this trick, and I have many of them. My strongest out is to just get the minutes right; that's amazing, too. Then I go on to the next person and see if I can connect psychically with them. If you do four people, and get the time right on the nose with one of them, and get the minutes right on three others, that's pretty darmrn good!

4. Not looking at the watch continuously. You can't continuously look at the watch as you patter; your occasional checks of the time must be natural. Use your peripheral vision.

5. How do you frame the trick? Are you guessing what time of day a person was born? Asking them to think of a time? Are you thinking of a time of day and asking them to "receive" the information psychically? Each of these have pros and cons, and frame the trick differently.

I have gotten corporate jobs just from performing this one trick. It's paid for itself several times over. It can be done closeup and stage. It can be done impromptu, in a casual situation, and without bringing out a deck of cards. Great trick, don't worry.
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Postby Guest » 11/30/03 06:02 PM

Thank you, David. I'm waiting for my purchase by mail, but without giving it away -- so a spectator can hold the watch after you've apparently set the prediction time?
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Postby Guest » 11/30/03 06:04 PM

Also, it'd be ineresting to know if you use Psychokinetic Time.
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Postby Guest » 11/30/03 06:56 PM

Originally posted by andy:
Thank you, David. I'm waiting for my purchase by mail, but without giving it away -- so a spectator can hold the watch after you've apparently set the prediction time? And do you do Psychokinetic Time?
Yes, the spectator can hold the watch, but it's riskier, of course. I've done it but it spooks me. Today's audiences can act unexpectedly at times. The most reliable place to do such a trick is onstage, with a female audience member who looks docile. But even they can surprise you.

Holding it yourself is nearly as good. When people backtrack, they most often say, "It's voice activated." And I reply by speaking into the watch: "Do my laundry!" But the idea that it's voice activated is ludicrous, and they know it. That technology just isn't here yet.

You must also watch out that you don't press in the stem before you show the time. They sometimes think that's how you get it to the correct time.

Yes, I do PTime, but I don't want to talk about it. It's too good.
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Postby Guest » 11/30/03 07:08 PM

Problem: how to come up with a close-up design duplication. Solution? Not an impression device. In restaurant work, people want to know why you're handing them a surface to draw on. No, I've tried drawing with a nailwriter. The only wrinkle with that is you need misdirection to do the act right in front of them. Any thoughts.
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Postby Guest » 12/01/03 09:49 AM

Apart from the price, what's the difference between:
- Watch and Wear
- Time Machine
- Masters Time machine
and alike...
?

Thanks

FM
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 12/01/03 09:55 AM

Apart from the price, what's the difference between:
- Watch and Wear
- Time Machine
- Masters Time machine
and alike...
?

Thanks

FM
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 12/01/03 04:57 PM

Great question, Mr. Magician. But I'm not sure all those people out there want to talk about it. It's no fun to put up the big bucks only to find out you've got something less than the best.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 12/05/03 05:54 PM

I've purchased Watch and Wear,which has created somewhat of a dilemma for me: the thing is so good, I need to create some distraction to take the heat off of it. People, it seems, will tend to think the mystery is in the mechanism and not in my skills as a mentalist. Please advise on some approaches that can be taken to take people down the wrong path. Thanks, Andy
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Postby Guest » 12/06/03 08:31 AM

Originally posted by Franck Magician:
Apart from the price, what's the difference between:
- Watch and Wear
- Time Machine
- Masters Time machine
and alike...
?
Thanks

FM
Dear friend:
Watch & Wear was created 6 years ago by Bazar de Magia.
It works with a gravity system usung a miniature silver hammer inside.
Time machine and Masters time machine are rip offs of our watch. Both works
with a mercurium switch inside, and they are very fragile for this reason.
Watch & Wear gives you one year warranty and and Time machine, ...nothing.
Regards

Martin Pacheco
Bazar de Magia - Argentina
mailto:bazar@magia.com.ar
Tel/Fax : (+ 54 -11) 4334-5594
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Postby Guest » 12/06/03 09:22 AM

Andy:
Regarding close-up design duplications, you might want to check out Richard Busch's approaches in "Peek Performances", particularly one he calls The Legendary Billet of El Zorro. Richard Marks also has a very clever method in his book which is tailor-made for close-up conditions. Cassidy's "White Dwarf" routine, in which you get the information in spite of the fact that the paper has been sealed in TWO envelopes, is great and meets test conditions.Finally, Alain Nu's close-up mental routine with business cards (see his book "Mind over Matter") could easily be adapted to a design duplication.
The difficulty is not glimpsing the information you need. All of the approaches above are very deceptive, and obviously there are plenty of other great methods that I haven't mentioned. The problem, of course, is getting that participant to hand you the piece of paper. You need a justification or the method will be transparent, regardless of how sneaky the peek is. Richard Osterlind and Banachek have both published wonderful ways to justify getting that paper within the context of their center tears. This aspect of obtaining information often goes unmentioned, but it is, it seems to me, at least as important as the peek itself.
Of course, by returning to the impression devices that you've already ruled out, the problem is solved. Barrie Richardson's impression device in "Theater of the Mind" could be used at a table. If the participant insists on removing the paper before drawing the design, you could just go into a center tear as an out. Or, if you created a justification such as wanting to make sure that no one else at the table glimpses the design, you could use something like John Riggs' "Gray Mosquito" (a truly great prop) so that they have a surface to write on when they stand away from the table or turn in their chair away from the group.
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Postby Guest » 12/06/03 09:32 AM

Having the opportunity to review both Watch asn Weat and it's "clones" There's little difference in operation. Mr Pacheko's product clearly came out earlier, and comes with a guarantee and routines. The Rime machine did not
I think if you want to respect creators work, their items deserve preference in purchase
from
Ford
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Postby Guest » 12/06/03 10:54 AM

Regarding the routining of "Watch and Wear," it's such a good product and so direct -- that --in my opinion -- you have to make it "not so good" -- not that perfect. You have to miss -- maybe get the hour but not the exact minute. And, again in my view -- admittedly not after a lot of reflection -- but in my view, you'd have to camouflage it. For instance, I wouldn't say, "Name any time. I'll set my watch to a certain time...so forth" -- and then reveal the predicted time. As good as it is, you need to bury it for it to be truly effective. As much as I hate to mix it up with a center tear or impression or anything like that...maybe it would complement Ban.'s Psych time. More thoughts later. thanks
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Postby Guest » 12/06/03 11:16 AM

I use Time Machine (didn't know W&W was the original) as well as Psychokinetic Time. One is a telepathy/prediction effect while the other is telekinetic. Before I purchased TM I used Daryl's Swatched(?). It's a much cheaper solution and to most lay audience the effect is just the same.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » 12/06/03 08:11 PM

Originally posted by andy:
Regarding the routining of "Watch and Wear," it's such a good product and so direct -- that --in my opinion -- you have to make it "not so good" -- not that perfect. You have to miss -- maybe get the hour but not the exact minute. And, again in my view -- admittedly not after a lot of reflection -- but in my view, you'd have to camouflage it. For instance, I wouldn't say, "Name any time. I'll set my watch to a certain time...so forth" -- and then reveal the predicted time. As good as it is, you need to bury it for it to be truly effective. As much as I hate to mix it up with a center tear or impression or anything like that...maybe it would complement Ban.'s Psych time. More thoughts later. thanks
I often make a slight mistake with W & W in order to make it more believable. If you miss by 2 or 3 minutes, that's great. Strangely enough, missing by five minutes or more isn't as strong, and I don't know why.

I think what you're running into, however, is the power of mentalism in general. It's so strong that it rivets people. It makes people want you to either declare it real like John Edward or reveal the method. So you're right, it sometimes does make them want to look at the watch.

That's why you should follow it with some other mentalism effect. Any good mentalism effect will do. Here's a good transition:

"Now, that was the power of the mind at work," you say. "This also uses the power of the mind, but in a different way...."

It steers them away from the watch. And even if they start examining the watch, just keep it fastened on your wrist and keep it level. Even if they pull out the stem, it won't move unless it's vertical.

Lately, I've been using it as a test of other people's mindpower, not mine. You're in a group of five, perhaps, and say:

"Some people have special powers of the mind and don't know it. For example, I'm going to send some information to you. We'll make it pure information--numbers. Words have too many emotional associations with them, but numbers are pure information.

"I'll set a time on my watch...there. Okay, just tell me the first time that comes into your mind."

They name a time. If it's close, you can wait it out. If it's not, don't commit yourself as to whether they're right or wrong; that leaves your options open, so you can eventually go for that person's time or another's.

When stalling, you might, for example, ask for exact minutes, if they've named something like 6 o'clock. Once again, you don't commit on whether they got it right or wrong.

Turn to the next person.

"Okay, what's the first time that comes into your mind?" you say.

They name a time, and all the time, you're waiting, waiting, waiting, for the hands to go around the clock to the exact time. Hey, you have five people in all who can name times! And the more people there are, the more chance you have to run into somebody who will take it upon themselves to stall, further benefiting you.

This stalling is a jazz kinda thing. When you finally get a named time that is close to where the watch's hands are, you say:

"Well, you got the closest. As you can see, you were only a couple minutes off. You must have a very, very strong intuitive power. Let's try a tougher challenge with you...."

And then you're off on another trick, steering the audience away from the mechanism of W & W....
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Postby Guest » 12/06/03 09:39 PM

David, good approach. Very good.
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Postby Guest » 12/18/03 10:31 PM

My two cents.....

I own an original Perfect Time pressure switch from Collectors (now safely stored away) and 2 Time Machines from Magic Makers. I have used them all extensively and have had nothing but great success with them all.

I have no experience with Watch & Wear, so I can't comment. But the Time Machines have served me very well.

Ben S
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