Taking it to the Streets

Discuss general aspects of Genii.
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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 12:31 pm

I totally agree with the "hit and run" or the "guerilla" ideas. I hate seeing magic, an art form countless centuries old is degraded my third graders with a deck of cards and a couple of DVDs. I hate it when I see people going around performing in a Tshirt and cut-offs that think Blaine and Angel are the best magicians that have ever been on the face of the planet.

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 1:15 pm

Bravo (again) Dustin.
You and Dee helped me crystalize a thought: Has anyone ever seen these new street guys "pass a hat"? Have any of these new street guys ever even alluded to passing a hat?

To me, street magic is an actual act with a beginning/middle/end, has a point, and an attendant reality: if you stink, you don't eat (among other things) very well.

Street magic is NOT middle-class teenagers showing-off a trick they just got, momentarily shocking people with a gimmick just for fun, and then heading home to their cozy beds, regardless of outcomes.

I hate to say it, but I have become a crotchety codger (surprise!).

[Unexpected tangent here:]
When the movie "Cocktail" came out, and everyone was wowed by Tom Cruise's "flair-handling" of bottles ( :sleep: ) my boss at the time (a very busy restaurant/bar) used to rant, "Did you see how much booze he spilled?! And the whole movie he never rang up one drink! He never even went near a cash register!"
I have come to feel something similar about these roving gangs of quarter-biters, under the impression that flash is all that matters.

What is their motivation other than highjinks? Lord knows I love highjinks--just don't delude yourself that they are deeply meaningful, unforgettable, transformative, world-shaping events. They usually ain't.

Flash without substance; Flash powder in a pot--boom--nothing left but smoke that quickly dissipates and a lingering odor.

P.S. I also must admit my irritation at the usage of the word "street" as an adjective..."This one is cool--it's totally street!" Give me a break.

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 1:34 pm

The distinction between passing a hat and ambushing them with a camera crew is interesting.

Something about the implied promise to appear on a TV show appears to do wonders.

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 1:50 pm

Right on Jonathan.

Ian Kendall
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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Ian Kendall » May 19th, 2007, 1:56 pm

I can think of two Ambushers who pass the hat (I think I'm mentioned them before).

I remember seeing on two or three occasions a magician in Leicester Square in London who worked by approaching small groups or couples, much as one would at a strolling gig, performing a set and then passing a hat. The sightings were spread over a couple of years, so I'm assuming he wasn't that bad at it.

In Dublin Owen Lean has made a living performing this kind of magic in (I think) Grafton Street. Apparantly he obtained a degree in magic performance through it, and was profiled briefly in Magic a few months ago.

I do concede that two in a couple of thousand does not make a particularly persuasive statistic.

Take care, Ian

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 2:15 pm

Thank you Ian--I am surprised and impressed.

I really am glad to hear there is some good around--even if it is 5,049 miles (or 8,125 km) away. :) (San Francisco to Edinburgh--thank YOU Google distance calculator!)

As in any area: the cream usually rises (just like Hemingway said--har har)...

P.S. "Street Sense" is favored in today's Preakness Stakes...

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 3:34 pm

I beleive that a lot can be learn in this strolling style or whatever you want to call it. You learn the basic presentation and performance that, if you choose, can evolve into being the basic knowledge that you use to get paying gigs. It is when people get into the mind set that they should dress grungy so that the magic seems to come from someone ordinary, that is what I don't want to see.

I remember I was walking down the coast and there were all kinds of performers. This one guy had a table he set up. He grabbed his wand and loudly proceded to yell "MAGIC SHOW!!! MAGIC SHOWWWW!!!" I was curious so I stuck around to see him do several random effects with awful presentation. This is the image that some people are spreading. Deos that worry anyone else?

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Ian Kendall » May 19th, 2007, 4:42 pm

Street Performing is as close to pure Darwinism as magic gets. Either you are adaptive and get good in a hurry, or you get hungry and give up.

I was lucky enough to start in a unique situation of being able to crank out shows one after the other. For the first three days I did about seven shows a day, and each one was different, and marginally less crap than the one before. By the middle of day four I had a show that stayed pretty much the same for about four years. I don't remember my first hat, but the second was 27p...

I've seen a number of people who gave it a shot, didn't like it, or got disillusioned with a low success rate, and moved on.

Take care, Ian

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 6:47 pm

Dustin; thanks in-advance for crediting me with being 3 for 3 video-wise. ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzhP9zRmlEA

P.S. Viva Sam Cooke.

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 6:47 pm

What Cyril, Blaine and Cris are doing may not fit the definition of street magic as we used to know it. However, languages change generally at the whim of the people. Definitions get added to words already in use and new words get added to languages.

I guess street magic includes the meaning of watching magicians (on tv or the net) perform out side the venue of an established theater.

I don' think we can do anything about it.

Randy

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 8:30 pm

I like callin' 'em street assassins and hallway hit men. Makes them feel tough too.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 10:24 pm

Street Magic, or Illustrated Begging as I like to call it, is not the same as strolling. They have different ends.

When you do a strolling gig youre being paid by someone other than the audience you're working for. There is no concern to squeeze money from your spectators.

In Street Magic youre performing a free show and then laying on a guilt trip sufficient to spur the audience into giving you something for what you just gave them for free. At best, its a hustle, at worst, its a grinding way to make a living.

Charlie Miller once told me a story about something that happened to Francis Carlyle. Seems Francis was doing something in a bar that had been visited by another performer earlier either that day on in the week. At some point in his set Francis asked a spectator for a $5 bill. The guy had been a victim of the previous busker whod walked away with the bill. The guy stood up, said something like, Here it comes, referencing the hustle of the money, and proceeded to knock Francis over a table.

I prefer subscribing to T. Nelson Downs dictum regarding being paid to perform: The more they pay you, the more they will respect you and enjoy your show.

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 19th, 2007, 11:04 pm

Not "pass the hat"?....Actually when Blaine is on TV, he passes a BIG hat, called commercials...those who don't like him, move(click) on...those who do, stay tuned.

I have seen some good street (level) performers, but in the electronic public square and along the information highway,Blaine has formated HIS concept/persona on a global scale.

No one understands television better than David Blaine

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Ian Kendall » May 20th, 2007, 2:07 am

David,

When you said; "In Street Magic youre performing a free show and then laying on a guilt trip sufficient to spur the audience into giving you something for what you just gave them for free. At best, its a hustle, at worst, its a grinding way to make a living."

I'm assuming you are talking about bottling a hit and run show. Because if you are talking about real street performing, you couldn't be more wrong.

Take care, Ian

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 7:36 am

Malini and Jarrow are two of my favorite 'illustrated beggars'.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 11:48 am

David, while I have great respect for you I think your statement about street performers, and I'm talking in the Cellini and Gazzo sense, is not only inaccurate but rather rude. I hope you didn't mean for it to come out as negative as it did.

Domingo, your statement about Blaine is very interesting and actually makes sense to me. Thank you.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 1:24 pm

roving gangs of quarter-biters
:D Very Funny... like a zombie movie.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 1:37 pm

If there is no fee agreed to in advance from a third party hiring the performer, then the money must come from the audience, either before the show by the purchase of tickets, or after by "donation." This latter condition is a rather haphazard way of getting money from an audience.

I'm not knocking the skill of Gazzo or Cellini or any other street performer, nor am I attempting to be rude to anyone. I'm making the observation that if the money is not agreed to in advance, then pressure must be put on the audience to part with money to pay for the show. In that light, any group or organization that relies on donations, essentially begs for their money. It may be couched in sophisticated direct mail pitches, but it's still begging.

If a street performer's audience thinks the show is worth something or have been guilt-tripped into making a "donation," they throw money in the hat, otherwise, they continue watching for free or walk away. The more successfully pressure of one kind or another is put on the audience, the more money is collected. Every successful charity knows that which is why the like to put pictures of doe-eyed waifs on the covers of their brochures.

Absent any discussion of the quality of their performance, if street performers are not entertaining beggars...or "beggars who entertain," then what are they?

Are they, in the words of Blance DuBois, people who "rely on the kindness of strangers?"

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 2:05 pm

Anyone who's seen enough street magicians, from Europe to the US to Australia, as I have - will know that David Alexander's description is completely accurate. It's like defamation; it can't be offensive if it's fair comment.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 2:13 pm

I must agree, there is some brilliant work that goes into street performing, and we 'noblize' it on forums for a reason...probably as part of our training we should all spend a year on the streets...

but,

It does seem like a very difficult way to make a living over a long period of time.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Ian Kendall » May 20th, 2007, 3:01 pm

At the risk of entering 'rant mode', I beg to differ with David on pretty much every level of his post.

To say that Street performers are beggers is, as has been said, ignorant and insulting. At best, it shows that David knows nothing about the subject in question, and at worst, it indicates an unwelcome prejudice against a group of performers. I can't believe that it was meant as a compliment...

It seems that there has been an awful lot said lately about 'Buskers' (to use a shorter term, and to distinguish from the Blaine crew) by people with no real experience of working the streets. As such, the comments are based on an outsider's viewpoint, with as much validity as the layman who says, upon being offered to choose a card, 'I've seen that one...'

Here's what a busker has to do; he has to identify a pitch, he has to generate an audience and he has to entertain that audience to the point where they _want_ to pay for the show. If we existed solely on 'guilt trip' money, we would all have starved long ago. If we relied on coercing people to pay for entertainment noone would get a ten pound drop, or a twenty dollar drop (I've even heard of a fifty dollar drop, but I didn't see it). If people were forced to pay, through the magical equivalent of a doe eyed child, the art would have died hundreds of years ago.

Busking is hard, make no bones about it. Many try, and many fail. But you cannot make the sweeping generalisation that all buskers are little more than beggers tricking people from their money. It's no better than saying all Illusionists are poseurs who let the assistants do all the work.

An example; several years ago a couple came up to me after a show to drop into my hat. With a smile they told me how they had seen my show a few years earlier, and how much they enjoyed it. I was in Edinburgh at the time, and the show they had seen was in Sydney. Do you honestly think that they paid for two shows, and remembered me enough to mention years later, if it was all about begging and guilt?

The bottom line is that good buskers entertain their audience. The really good buskers can give most other magicians a run for their money, as well. It's no secret that a percentage of an audience will walk - it comes with the territory. But those that pay, they do _not_ do it from guilt. The bottling speech is a crucial, and much studied part of a show - to reduce it to 'give me money, please' is ridiculous.

It's almost as if there is an undercurrent of 'we mock that which we do not understand'. I used to be dismissive of Kids Entertainers, until I realised the skills needed to control and keep attention of a group of small children. Now I have a very healthy respect for them. The thing with busking is that the skill is not two way; the average busker will have the 'chops' to entertain in most venues, it does not follow that a talented close up worker will be able to hack it on the street.

As Stuart says; everyone should spend some time on the street. The audience management lesson alone is invaluable, and there are many other lessons to be learned. The list of people who came in from the cold is long and illustrious - a smatterting off the top of my head would include Harry Anderson, Eddie Izzard, John Lenahan, Whit Haydn and Pete Wardell (and that's ignoring the obvious ones such as Cellini, Sheridan, Gazzo and Capehart).

I would suggest that David spend some time with a few buskers, both active and retired, and see how many of them agree with his portrait.

Take care, Ian

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Ian Kendall » May 20th, 2007, 3:06 pm

An addendum to David's question of what Buskers are; I would suggest that they are entertainers who temporarily create a venue, put on a show, and get the true value of that show in return.

Whether the hat is thirty pounds or three hundred pounds, it will be the most honest money you ever earn.

Take care, Ian

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 3:12 pm

There are undeniably some great performers working in this genre. But anyone who has ever seen a standard street magic show, hearing the guy go into all the tiresome pitches and guilt-trips about tips and so on, and says it isn't akin to begging - is bloody well delusional.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 3:46 pm

I find it fascinating that people who don't know me are able to read my mind and intentions from thousands of miles away. I have no prejudice against street performers. I was making an observation about what they are, nothing more. I say something someone doesn't like and suddenly I'm prejudiced.

With regard to the "honest money" comment - David Copperfield and Lance Burton (for example) pull in honest money because people pay in advance to see their shows. Their audiences self-select, decide to pay the cost of the ticket, set aside the time, and take themselves to the venue. They have valued the show.

I have no doubt that Ian and many others put on a skilled show, doubtless entertaining, but absent a pre-agreed upon fee, street performers and buskers rely on the generosity of strangers who didn't hire them in the first place, didn't volunteer to come to a show, didn't request anything be done for them, but are, for some odd reason, expected to pay for something they didn't order.

The spectators might enjoy the show and have had a great time, but the point remains, there was no pre-arrangement as to show and payment, so the payment comes from whatever emotional response is engendered in the spectators by the performer. Be that high or be that low, and, frankly Ian, anyone who works hard and delivers a good show is worth more than 30 pounds.

If you can make a living at it, you have my respect, but it's a hell of a way to grind out the money.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Ian Kendall » May 20th, 2007, 4:09 pm

Joe; The difference between begging and bottling is that begging implies that someone is taking pity on the performer.

David; your comments, once again, seem to miss the mark. I apologise for the prejudice comment; it was typed in haste.

As for honest money and the value of a show; your analogy is incorrect - people pay to see a big show, but there is no guarantee that they will feel they have recieved their money's worth. I have heard countless times of people who, having paid for a show, felt that it was overpriced. On the street, however, you get _exactly_ what you are worth, and that is why it is honest money. Oh, and I mentioned 30 to 300 hats as arbitrary numbers that were indicative of the highs and lows. But, as I've said, my second hat was 27p, and that's pretty much what the show was worth.

As to people paying for something they didn't order, that is again showing a lack of understanding. It may be true that members of the audience did not leave the house intending to see a show (although not neccessarily - often people will come to known pitches with the express intention of wathcing street shows). However, once they stop and watch, they are actively participating, albeit in a paradoxically passive way. Noone _forces_ anyone to watch their show. People are free to walk away whenever they like. The fact that they stay is testament to the value of the show (or in may case, often because I've stolen their sunglasses, but that's another subject).

In fact, it's this bit which is so completely wrong:

"didn't volunteer to come to a show, didn't request anything be done for them, but are, for some odd reason, expected to pay for something they didn't order."

They absolutely did come to the show, by stepping up to the edge. They did request the show, by staying. They are _asked_ to pay for something they have enjoyed.

Busking is a grind, to be sure. But for the most part, it's a fun grind, and no worse than a three hour restaurant gig for less money. There is a camraderie amoung buskers that certainly does not exist in any other branch of magic (and there are great big full blown gonzo whoppers of fights, too). As for making a living - let's assume that your performer has a good pitch. He does three or four shows a day, each one perhaps an hour long. Assuming he's good, let's say he makes 75 pounds hats (at a low estimate). That's in the region of 300 pounds a day for three hours work, with no boss and noone checking what time he comes to work. There's a really good chance that he enjoys his work. He gets to hang out with friends when he's not working. If he travels to a festival, the hats can be much bigger, plus he gets to see the world.

You are right, David. It's a hell of a way to earn a living.

Take care, Ian

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 8:03 pm

I have a brother who is a begger. He stands with a sign that claims he'll work for money (note, he won't), he does nothing but stand and look pitiful and tries to get money from you.

The street performers who are good (some people who claim to be performers are indeed beggers with props) are in areas where people expect to see a performer. That performer gathers a crowd and does his show, no one is forced to stop and stay, no one is forced to pay for said show. The difference is the patron pays after the event rather than prior to it. It is tough but if in the right area they can make a decent living. It is a call back to a long tradition in the art and I respect those that do it. Do you consider the museums that operate on 'donations' rather than a set price to be 'begger organizations'? I would hope not.

I apologize to you, David, if I came across as anything but surprised. I was reading into the tone, as I percieved it, and the term 'beggers' kind of shocked me.

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 20th, 2007, 9:39 pm

David wrote>>>I was making an observation about what they are, nothing more.>>>

There is no value-for-value exchange between a beggar and a donor.

In a street performance, there most definitely IS a value-for-value exchange. A show in exchange for whatever the audience thinks it's worth.

The former is charity, the latter is capitalism in a very pure form.

P&L
D

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 1:02 am

Joe; The difference between begging and bottling is that begging implies that someone is taking pity on the performer.
LOL. Whatever euphemistic world view works for you, dude.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 1:01 pm

David you said:

"I find it fascinating that people who don't know me are able to read my mind and intentions from thousands of miles away. I have no prejudice against street performers."

-- the snide sarcasm expressed here is indicative of the attitude that characterizes your side of the argument, at least you seem to share it with Joey boy.

"If you can make a living at it, you have my respect..."

-- I have no respect for beggars.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 1:29 pm

No one understands television better than David Blaine
Clearly you have never heard of Dick Wolf or William Peterson.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 1:59 pm

[I]With regard to the "honest money" comment - David Copperfield and Lance Burton (for example) pull in honest money because people pay in advance to see their shows. /I]

WRONG: IF I WANT TO GO TO THOSE SHOWS I HAVE TO PAY WHAT THEY WANT. THAT IS NOT HONEST MONEY THAT IS MANIPULATIVE.

if you go to a musical you have to pay upfront and don't know what is comming.

with a street performance you can see the show and pay afterwards what you think it is worth. that's "honest money".

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 3:18 pm

For those of you coming late to the game Eric Evans is one of the authors of The Secret Art of Magic which is essentially Street Magic & The Art of War.

He knows a thing or two about busking, and gives a very entertaining and thoughtful lecture.

Guest

Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 3:25 pm

"the snide sarcasm expressed here is indicative of the attitude that characterizes your side of the argument, at least you seem to share it with Joey boy"

Hmmmm. I sense... tension.

Didn't mean to hurt your feelings, Erica.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 3:48 pm

Thanks Bill, that's a very kind introduction.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Dustin Stinett » May 21st, 2007, 7:11 pm

The devolution of this thread has been fascinating. What started as a thread on the name of a different form of magic (that, I realized, is far from new) versus Street Magic (as it was defined until 1996) has turned into a compare and contrast discussion on busking versus begging.

Oh well (sigh).

Before I attempt to steer this is in the direction I originally intended, I just want to make some observations on some of the comments in this thread.

To my friend David: I think youre wrong on this one (I dont get to say that too often), but I understand your point.

Ian has made all the primary arguments, but I think Steve V. articulated it the best in his post about his brother.

Second, to my friend Diego: A metaphorical hat is not the same thing as a real one that is passed after a street show. Besides, unless Blaine has some kind of deal setup where he garners ancillary profits based on the shows ratings (does such a thing exist in TV?), I dont see him passing the hat at all. Hes paid what hes contracted to be paid (reruns included) regardless of how the show is received by the viewing audience.

Randys comment on the changes in language is what Im against in this case. As he pointed out, the semantic alterations and additions made to words and phrases is an ongoing process in any living language. But usually (not always) words and phrases change meaning because the old one is no longer viable (or at least common). So at issue here is that Street Magic is, I think, being misused. To call this Hit and Run style of magic Street Magic is wrong since it takes place in clubs, bars; all sorts of places. For the most part (yes, I recognize there are exceptions) busking takes place on the streets, in parks, and other outdoor areas. Also, the characteristics of the act are quite different.

Randy believes its too late, and hes probably correct (after all, its been more than a decade since the phrase was hijacked). But if the Hit and Run crowd likes the term (giving it street-cred as Dave said), and we start using it when talking about them, maybe they will migrate toward that and away from the old phrase.

As it turns out, one of my favorite historical icons of magic was, without a doubt, a Hit and Run performer on occasion. In fact, he was famous for it. The story of him ambushing Senator Mark Hanna on the steps of the Capitol Building is a great example of that form of magic (though Malini had a definite end in mind for his means). Of course, I doubt wed be able to convince the Blaine Gang that their type of magic is at the very least a full century old. So just pretend I didnt mention it.

Dustin

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 7:41 pm

busking, begging... what about using a camera crew to ambush folks into being overly appreciative for being mugged?

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 9:21 pm

My apologies if I steered this thread in a manner not in keeping with the accustomed decorum but it seemed germane to the topic at hand.

As for one of terminology, I believe there exists some terminology that has been previously acknowledged by many on many occasions and that is the term(s) "guerrilla" magic or a "commando" type act. Seems appropriate enough as the negative connotations of "hit and run" seem to detract from the likelihood of anyone using it.

As you were ;)

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 21st, 2007, 9:45 pm

Since this this is a magic thread, I didn't feel the need to qualify, that no one in MAGIC, understands television better than Blaine.

Dustin, I'll stick to my point: Those who watch Blaine on TV, or buskers on the street, either keep watching or walk/click away. By continuing to watch, they are induced to buy products/services, or pay the cable company or the busker.
A generation ago, it wasn't too uncommon to see someone pitching Svengali decks or the mouse on busy street corners...just as Marshall Brodien would later pitch his TV Magic Cards on the air.

Yes, depending on the contract, ratings can increase the payoff for the perfomer(s)...some shows are sold on the premise of acheiving a certain rating, or else concessions are made.
Likewise, like some infomercial deals, Mark Wilson may not have been paid a salary, put was paid, on a "per sale" basis.....just as Brodien may also have a "per sale" deal, when he pitches his sets on QVC.

There are some whose efforts on the streets, would only get charity dollars, but most people just walk away....There are performers, who do street theater, who can build and nail down their crowd, hold them, and turn them for the money.
Some ENTERTAINERS, who work Venice Beach and other venues, are good enough, that people bring their friends over to see them again.
In some venues, like Universal Studios CityWalk, only street performers who show talent and a professional demeanor, are auditioned/allowed to work there, otherwise they are gone.

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Dustin Stinett » May 22nd, 2007, 10:26 am

Diego,

Well have to agree to disagree on this one.

If I want to (legally) have cable TV in my home, I have to pay for it. I pay the fee that is determined by the provider regardless of how much (or even whether or not) I watch it.

With a busker, I have all the choices: Whether or not I watch, whether or not I pay, and how much I pay if I choose to do so.

I wish I had those choices with my television!

Dustin

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Re: Taking it to the Streets

Postby Guest » May 22nd, 2007, 11:35 am

Oh isnt it just so fashionable nowadays to bash street performers! Thank god for street magic. Perhaps more energy is better spent talking about bad magicians! Unfortunately many here simply miss the point. And most here need to realllllly get down off their high horses! Street Magic as it is being called today is about love of an art, nothing more or less which is just being presented in a different setting...not your cute cabaret shows, not making balloons for snotty nosed kids, not doing the redundant corporate thing for a bunch of old drunkards...and REAL street magic is certainly not about making money! It cant be, cause it dont pay that much with respect to the effort put into it! Magic is an art to be performed when given the chance whether it be on the street or indoors...Yes, some of you have had the good luck of being able to turn a hobby into a career. But again that is a very small percentage of lovers of this art...However, please remember back when most of you (before your gigs)went around to just about anyone who would (as in the words of Greg Wilson)"watch your silly little trick"...Whats a better way to do magic than by getting out and getting performing experience on the street. Trying to perform what you love to do in front of strangers takes courage and that is a special kind of MAGIC. Using your skills in front of, as one wrote "target", those who ordinarily would have no interest in magic. By the way, all spectators of magic are "targets".
Magic is art first. If you believe that there is some higher value in performing for some so-called respectable venue such as a club or stage, forget it...it just aint so! Those in it only for the money whether it be street or whatever are the real vipers to this wonderful art. I believe the real drive comes from the thrill and excitement of performing whether it be for a group of friends, clients, on t.v., or whatever, be it outdoors or in. So to all those calling themselves today street magicians I say go for it and do your thing as you are the real frontline performers to demonstrate our art to those perhaps unable, initially uninterested, or unwilling to go to PAY for a magic show. And for those lucky enough to be able to put on a show for money perhaps a bit more gratitude is due to these "street magic performers" who may just well be the catalysts to opening the the minds (and wallets) of those customers who will later pay for your show!...
Peace!


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