Rising Cards History?

Discuss the historical aspects of magic, including memories, or favorite stories.

Postby John Bodine » 10/25/04 11:52 AM

I'm wondering if someone out there might be able to point me in the direction of some history of the rising cards. I'm certain the effect goes way back but am not aware of any book or manuscript tracing its history and lineage. I'm not so interested in methods employed but that would also be interesting to read about.

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Postby Guest » 10/25/04 03:21 PM

You might want to start with "Greater Magic"...

Best, PSC
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Postby Jacky Kahan » 10/25/04 03:50 PM

Hello

check out here and here on Genii Forum

Hope this helps,

Jacky
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Postby Tabman » 10/25/04 05:00 PM

Val Evans or Andrews, can't remember which, put out a pretty good little book on the Rising Cards and as Paul pointed out theres a great section in Hilliard's card book which is probably about the same as the section in Greater Magic.
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Postby Jacky Kahan » 10/26/04 12:36 AM

Hi,

just discovered another great thread with a lot of excellent information here on Genii.. check Here

Al the best,
Jacky
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Postby Guest » 10/26/04 09:23 AM

John,

I've gone thru most of the material I have at my disposal,(a considerable task), and I can't find anything that amounts to a history. Are you just curious, or considering doing one? It would certainly be an interesting project.

As I mentioned, GM has a large chapter on the R/C's, and if you read carefully you'll find things like: "...was ascribed to DeKolta. Later research proves that this improvement was invented by Hofzinser...", or "...Another very effective method was used by Robert Heller. He showed an old broom which he said had been the property of an old witch in New England on which she used to ride...", or "...invented almost a century ago by Professor Alberti, is still one of the most elegant of drawing room tricks...", or "...We have the authority of Professor Hoffmann for saying that Hartz was the first wizard to work the rising cards in its' most magical form..."

Aalso there are methods attributed to Howard Thurston, Robert Stull, Dr. Hooker, R.W.Hull, A.P.Neyhart, M.Ceillier, M. Guimard, Henry Gordien, Harlan Tarbell, Donald Holmes, Cardini, Jack McMillen, S. Leo Horowitz, Adrian Plate, Bautier DeKolta, etc.

Books that may contain references are either mentioned or inferred in/by the text: Hilliard's own "The Art of Magic", M. Ceillier's "Manuel Pratique d'Illusionisme et Prestidigitation", Thurston's small book "Howard Thurston's Card Tricks", Professor Hoffmann's "Modern Magic", or any of the other texts by him that may include information of the R/C, etc.

As you can see, GM IS a remarkable resource for methods and for reference, both direct and deduced, for developing a history of the effect.

Another interesting possibility is the magazines the magic fraternity is so fond of publishing. Advertisements for hundred of different Rising Card effects have been offered over the years. I listed dozens off the top of my head on another website. Dr. Albos collection included so many that I lost count. I handled dozens of different type myself when I worked for Marvin Burger, from homemade articles like J.G Thompson's own model as described in "My Best", to the Burtini Card Rise, and all those in between, including versions made by Martin, Andrews, Al Baker, Neyhart, Merv Taylor, Thayer, P&L, Davenport, Ken Brooke, Anverdi, etc.

Hope this has been helpful,

Best, PSC
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Postby Philippe Billot » 10/26/04 09:53 AM

Also see The Art of Magic, page 183 (Dover Publications)
Hilliard wrote : This trick was known and practice in the middle of the seventeenth century. There is an old Dutch book on magic in which there is an illustration....etc...
Anyone have an idea of this book ?
Also in La Piezza Universale di Tutti la Profession by Thomas Gerzonus (1626), it seems there is a description of the rising card.
But I haven't this book.
Anyone want to check ?
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Postby Jacky Kahan » 10/26/04 12:33 PM

Philippe,

Is the Dutch book you're talking about "Het Natuurlijk Tover-Boeck of Speel-Toneel der Konsten" by Simon Witgeest, 1773 ... ?

If it is, i did not find any illustrations related to the rising card.

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Postby Philippe Billot » 10/26/04 11:48 PM

Hilliard said seventeenth century. Your book was from eighteenth century.
In my files, I have a book entitled "Het Nieuw Toneel der Konsten" by Simon Witgeest, dated 1679.
Perhaps, it's the book quoted by Hilliard but I can't confirm because I don't possess it.
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Postby Marco Pusterla » 10/28/04 10:39 AM

Also in La Piezza Universale di Tutti la Profession by Thomas Gerzonus (1626), it seems there is a description of the rising card.
Hi!
I suppose you mean "La Piazza Universale di Tutte le Professioni del Mondo" by Tommaso Garzoni, first published in Venice (Venezia) in 1585. While I don't have the volume, I know it is available on the internet (I remember downloading it some years ago), and if I'm not wrong it has been OCR'd. A search on Google will return a number of results, but a quick look did not return its full text.

At the moment I'm quite busy, but I will try to check if I can find any reference the the RC.

All the best, ciao!
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Marco Pusterla - http://www.mpmagic.com

Paradise Lost out now - Christian Chelman's latest effect!
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Postby Philippe Billot » 10/28/04 12:51 PM

Thanks for these accuracies. I update my files.
You write Tommaso with 2 "M" but on the net they write Tomaso, Who is right ?
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Postby John Bodine » 10/28/04 04:37 PM

Wow! Thanks to everyone who contributed. I wasn't really planning on writing a book on the history but now I may consider digging through what I have, what others have suggested, and anything else I can scratch up and putting it into an article of sorts, although I'm certain I don't have the resources to complete an exhaustive article.

Again, my thanks to everyone for this wealth of information.

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Postby Jacky Kahan » 10/28/04 11:39 PM

Mr. Varola!
Thanks a lot for this contribution!
Jacky
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Postby Philippe Billot » 10/29/04 10:44 AM

As I know you read the french language, I say :
Bravo et merci pour tous ces prcieux renseignements.
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Postby John Bodine » 10/29/04 05:04 PM

I'm most fascinated by this quote

and [of course] he can rise any card from a pack of cards
To me, when someone uses "of course" in this way it would imply that this is a standard effect, perhaps common for the time. For example, if someone were to discuss a modern conjuror they might say "and of course he can make coins appear and disappear". But the printed record must determine who receives credit and your post is most appreciated.

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Postby Dale Shrimpton » 11/04/04 05:47 AM

just to add my bit.
I have a version in my collection that was created by Tubby Allinson, of the Star magic company, which I believe was based in Wales.
It is in essence, a glass box, with thin wooden sides with a chrome Houlete inside. the box has a handle on the top, and once the cards are inside, you can have a spectator hold the item via the handle , and have the cards rise.
Its not a mechanical rise, in fact it works on the floating thread method. the way the method is hidden is wonderful. It will hopefully be getting it's first public outing in goodness knows how long, at Watford magicians in December.
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Postby George Olson » 11/04/04 10:42 AM

J.G. Thompson has a version of the one Dale mentions in The Miracle Makers,on pp 282 and he mentions some interesting history.

I built one and placed the "motivating force" in the base that the "box" sat on...

eerie!

Gave it away in San Diego years and years ago.

GO
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Postby Guest » 11/04/04 06:19 PM

Originally posted by George Olson:
J.G. Thompson has a version of the one Dale mentions in The Miracle Makers,on pp 282 and he mentions some interesting history.

I built one and placed the "motivating force" in the base that the "box" sat on...

eerie!

Gave it away in San Diego years and years ago.

GO
I sold Thompson's original to a Doctor in San Francisco, who still has it. "Buma" bought it, we played with it for a month or so, fooling everyone who came into the shop, then, since "you can't be a dealer and a collector too!", as "Buma" always said, it found a new home. It was a wonderful rise, and the mechanism was smooth as glass, and completely silent.

Best, PSC
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