Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

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Bob Farmer
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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » June 14th, 2015, 9:13 am

More reviews from guys who know guys who know:

“[A] … big beautiful book …. This book is so much fun that I've been reading it straight through, which is very unlike my usual ADD habit of hopscotching around, skimming, etc. Only around 200 pages to go...
—Chris Aguilar

“It is fantastic!”
—Tim Ellis

“It arrived today … and is a thing of beauty.”
—J.K. Hartman

“If you are even slightly interested in this trick, you must get this. “
—Don Hendrix

Bob Farmer
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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » June 19th, 2015, 10:16 am

Unsolicited reviews from non-family members:

“Congratulations on your fantastic book. It is excellent! I can't wait for your next.”
Nick S.

“Holy @#$%! What a great book! A seriously major book. Bravo!”
—Todd Karr

“This is the greatest magic book ever …”
—Pete McCabe

P.S. To answer Nick's question--look for The Bammo Flim-Flam CONglomeration this fall. A compilation of all of my Flim-Flam columns with tons of new material.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » June 24th, 2015, 8:58 am

Great review by Jared Kopf in the July 2015 MAGIC. Excerpts follow:


“[This] … new collection of ten-card poker deals is as good as it is exhaustive.

“… If a student wants to learn almost everything there is to know about the Ten Card Deal, from its countless handlings to its fascinating background, he or she needs to look no further than Bob Farmer’s gigantic omnibus, The Bammo Ten Card Deal Dossier.

“… Most impressively … [the] … Dossier essentially covers a single topic and yet somehow remains utterly engrossing across every one of its 400 pages.

“… The Bammo Ten Card Deal Dossier is a masterful work of scholarship … [and the] … editorial comments (‘Bobservations’) are witty and insightful …[enhancing] … what is already a rewarding reading experience."
—Jared Kopf

Bob Farmer
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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » July 9th, 2015, 7:27 am

More reviews:

Received. Simply wonderful!
—P.T. Murphy

“Awesome! Indeed, someone might exclaim, ‘Bammo!’
“Thanks for justifying my love of card tricks.”
—Robert Neale

I've got Bob's book and would highly recommend this to anyone who is serious about card work and the thinking behind the subject matter. Definitely worth your serious consideration.
—Steve Brooks, Magic Cafe

“Great book. Five minutes after receiving it, I discovered two great ideas, just by chance. This book is an absolute must-buy.”
—J.J. Sanvert

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » July 17th, 2015, 11:36 am

Just in case you missed it:


“This oversized book of 400 pages is a monster compendium of methods, presentations, and variations ….

“I'll be honest: when ordering this book, I figured to merely skim it and keep it on the shelf as a reference. Alas, Bob Farmer's is one of the most compelling voices on the Genii forum, and I found myself reading deeper and deeper, mostly in Bob's voice, occasionally in that of others such as Harry Lorayne's. What could have been dry reading instead makes fascinating reading.
“… you don't need my recommendation; you know it's great. This is a fine book, a masterpiece of scholarship, all told with considerable class and wit, handsomely produced.
—Steve Bryant, Little Egypt Gazette

“I can’t remember ever being so knocked out by the arrival of a card book. It is truly magnificent—far, far more splendid than I imagined a card book could be. I’ve often thought that the things I didn’t know about the ten card deal would fill a book. Well, this is it, and it is so comprehensive that I cannot conceive of it ever being bettered.”
—Lewis Jones

“… a book people will be referencing as long as card magic is performed …. [Bob has written] one of the most valuable tomes of our times in Magic. If you've ever considered performing a gambling routine that utilizes cards—just buy this damned book!”
—Bruce Bernstein

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bill Mullins » July 17th, 2015, 11:43 am

I got a copy of the book a couple of weeks ago. Last week Magicana sent me the errata sheet.

I have to say, it is by far the best errata sheet I have ever seen.

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Richard Kaufman
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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Richard Kaufman » July 17th, 2015, 3:33 pm

Hey, I didn't see no stinkin' errata sheet!
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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby AJM » July 17th, 2015, 3:37 pm

My errata sheet came with its own errata sheet...
Corner-boy Begrudger

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Chris Aguilar » July 17th, 2015, 3:38 pm

Richard Kaufman wrote:Hey, I didn't see no stinkin' errata sheet!

Isn't it the same sheet that came with every copy? Had a bit of errata, a whole routine and some discussion on using the double ender gaff in a different way.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » July 18th, 2015, 8:40 am

Perhaps the errata was not including the errata sheet. There is only one, entitled, "Pharoahs & Magicians," a bit of Cockney rhyming slang I invented. Besides some corrections, it also contains one of the best stage routines in existence. That routine would have been in the book originally, but some problems with proper credits and consents arose (now all fixed).

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 11th, 2015, 4:15 pm

If you're at Magic Live, speak with David Ben and Julie Ing at the Potter & Potter booth. Copies of the book is for sale there.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 13th, 2015, 3:41 pm

The Bammo Ten Card Deal Dossier was a complete sellout at Magic Live. Thank you for your support.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 24th, 2015, 10:05 am

More very happy campers:

Your book is really great. I venture to say it will go down in history as one of the top ten. I really mean it for various reasons.
1. All usable material
2. Documented to the "hilt"
3. Good gambling theme.
—Geno Munari

Wow, it arrived today … and I have already read through about a third of it (and that is a lot considering the massive size of this book). This book is awesome. Very easy to read and well structured. I can't wait to work out a couple of these routines and hit the “Bar Crowd.” There are enough routines in this book that you could “Do that again” all night without repeating the exact same effect and getting called out
—Poof Daddy

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 24th, 2015, 6:06 pm

I have been doing this trick for well over 50 years. I first came across it in Bruce Elliot's "100 New Tricks". However, it wasn't until I came across it in Harry Lorayne's "Dexterity" that I really got the full value out of it. Harry's routine was enough for me and will always be enough. I vaguely remember that Harry stated that he was originally not going to include it in the book but Lou Tannen persuaded him to.

That means that we all owe Lou Tannen a great debt as well as Harry. It really is terribly well routined and I do Harry's routine without any variation of my own. It doesn't need it. I find it perfect just as it is.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Richard Kaufman » August 24th, 2015, 6:08 pm

Lorayne's version is excellent, and the template for many versions which follow.

However, Mark, I doubt you've read Bob Farmer's excellent new book. It has many routines which are better than Harry's.
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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 24th, 2015, 6:28 pm

I am sure it is an excellent book, Richard. However, I will be VERY surprised if there is a routine as good as Harry's in there! I would be delighted to be proved wrong by seeing a video or any kind of description. However even if this is true (which I doubt) I will not be changing one detail of Harry's routine.

Something happens when you perform a specific item for years on end. You get the exact timing and a very honed performance and it would be foolish to tinker with this although there may be the odd exception. I remember Billy McComb making the same point. You are often better off doing a routine which may be slightly inferior to some new version or adaptation simply because you have it honed to perfection through repeated performance.

Of course you have to be very careful of the "dropped details" theory that I came up with. I wrote about this in my "Wit and Wisdom" e-book and it became quite a famous article much to my surprise. No time to explain it here. However, if your details are dropping then perhaps it may well be a good procedure to update a routine you have been performing for years.

I won't be though. I cannot perceive of a routine better than Harry's when you work for real people. And I only work for REAL people. I do not consider magicians to come under that category. As I have often stated they like the wrong things for the wrong reason.

I wish Mr Farmer luck with the book though.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Jack Shalom » August 24th, 2015, 7:07 pm

Bob's book has Harry's routine in it word-for-word from Mr. L.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 24th, 2015, 7:17 pm

Word for word? I assume he got permission? The only reason I say this is that it seems when I read the earlier part of this long thread Harry didn't seem to be aware that his material was in the book. Of course perhaps they came to some agreement over the matter later on.

Just expressing my initial surprise-no more than that. No doubt there will be suitable clarification from Mr Farmer.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Richard Kaufman » August 24th, 2015, 7:49 pm

Harry is aware that his material is in the book and he gave permission. Don't start a fire where there is no smoke.
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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 24th, 2015, 7:51 pm

Mark: I think you're use-by date has passed. I suggest you find someone else to troll. I'm immune to your puerile pontifications. I know that's a big word for you, but since you obviously move your lips when you read, your mouth will get some needed exercise.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 24th, 2015, 9:38 pm

Dearie me. Mr Farmer is being dreadfully rude I must say. However, I will resist the urge to remark that 99 percent of lawyers give the rest a bad name.

I fully accept Richard's word (after all he is not a lawyer) that Harry was fully aware what was going on despite the confusion generated by the start of the thread.

All that has to be done now is convince me that Richard's statement that there are better versions than Harry's routine in the book is correct. I know this is a subjective opinion but I am afraid I find it an extraordinary claim and extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

Do excuse the last sentence. I have been associating with some of that lunatic Randi bunch lately and I am picking up some of their extraordinary language. I bet half of them are lawyers too come to think of it.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 25th, 2015, 10:09 am

I'll let Harry have the last word (from an email he sent)

“Just finished going through the book, Bob. Wow! What work and what a job! EXCELLENT.”
—Harry Lorayne

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Daniel Z » August 25th, 2015, 10:15 am

Mark (or do you prefer Performer). Nice to see you posting here and stirring the pot as is your pleasure (if not your fate as destined by the stars). I'm not sure why you would cast aspersions on a person of Bob Farmer's merits. I imagine you know him -- at least in passing and from my interactions with him he's always been honest, true blue, loyal -- as much boy scout and crazed, evil lawyer, magical genius. His book can easily stand on its own merits and certainly does not require praise from a duffer like me. As for the best routine? well I think we can all agree that there is too big a subjective dimension (not to mention all the other factors) to settle that one. But I am actually writing in response to your indirectly crediting Randi et al. for the often quoted: "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence". While sometimes credited to Randi or Carl Sagan, even to Martin Gardener -- Gardner himself is on record saying he first heard something like that from... wait for it... Marcello Truzzi.
Of course similar ideas can be found scattered through the history of philosophy but it seems Prof. Truzzi deserves credit for this formulation (at least if Martin Gardner can be believed).

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Jack Shalom » August 25th, 2015, 10:17 am

Bob, probably my favorite routine in the book is Bruce Bernstein's "Psyche Out." I always had one little question about that routine, and maybe you or someone else can provide some insight.

Why is it set up so that in all the deals, the first card goes to the performer? It seems easy enough to switch it to regulation play, where the dealer gets the card last. In fact, that's what I do, but I always wondered why the original had it otherwise.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 25th, 2015, 11:16 am

Daniel Z wrote:Mark (or do you prefer Performer). Nice to see you posting here and stirring the pot as is your pleasure (if not your fate as destined by the stars). I'm not sure why you would cast aspersions on a person of Bob Farmer's merits. I imagine you know him -- at least in passing and from my interactions with him he's always been honest, true blue, loyal -- as much boy scout and crazed, evil lawyer, magical genius. His book can easily stand on its own merits and certainly does not require praise from a duffer like me. As for the best routine? well I think we can all agree that there is too big a subjective dimension (not to mention all the other factors) to settle that one. But I am actually writing in response to your indirectly crediting Randi et al. for the often quoted: "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence". While sometimes credited to Randi or Carl Sagan, even to Martin Gardener -- Gardner himself is on record saying he first heard something like that from... wait for it... Marcello Truzzi.

Of course similar ideas can be found scattered through the history of philosophy but it seems Prof. Truzzi deserves credit for this formulation (at least if Martin Gardner can be believed).



Daniel. You really must read my post again. There were no "aspersions" cast on Mr Farmer. After all, I did not call him an "evil lawyer". YOU did! On the contrary I merely expressed a little puzzlement that at the beginning of this interminable thread that Harry didn't seem to know that he was in the book.I merely wanted a little clarification. I was terribly polite throughout as of course I always am. Indeed my courtesy and tact is renowned throughout the world of magic.

Alas the "crazed" (your word, not mine) part of him came to the fore and he erupted in a most unseemly show of temper which quite surprised me. I do hope he does not behave like this in court otherwise the judge might perhaps hold him in contempt. Or perhaps he is not the kind of lawyer who appears in court. You do have to have a certain eloquence for that. I bet I would be good at it.

I do not know Mr Farmer to any particular degree although he did have the terribly fortunate experience of meeting me twice in his life and I do recall several decades ago having a long telephone conversation with him where he was attempting to give me advice on something or other, I think possibly with importing things into Canada. He was not a lawyer at the time and no doubt was practicing on me to try and get the hang of that particular trade. Of course the advice he was giving was completely useless so of course I completely ignored it putting it down to youthful enthusiasm rather than any practical knowledge. I do believe at the time he was a student filling in the Summer as a customs officer on the border.

I remember shuddering inwardly that students who had only just come off breast feeding were being hired to screen people entering Canada as a Summer job. Better than MacDonalds I suppose.

The first time I met him was when he was an enthusiastic callow youth in London where I had taken a table at some Magic Circle function or other where I could sell stuff to magicians. He approached my table with a fellow enthusiast named Michael Florence as I recall.

The second time I met him I went to some apartment or other (probably his) in the company of other Toronto magicians. This was decades ago. He did trick after trick and pontificated eagerly. I said nothing and merely took it all in. When I left a friend of mine who was with me and knew me well said, "You don't like him, do you?"

I was startled at his intuition and said, "I wouldn't say that. I just find him very irritating and egotistical. He plainly loves himself-that is for sure"

You see. It takes one to know one.

As to the "extraordinary evidence" thing --yes, I did know about Marcello Truzzi. One of the less rabid and demented sceptics and a very reasonable and open minded man from all accounts.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 25th, 2015, 2:11 pm

Since #ark #ewis insists on hijacking discussions with irrelevant mumblings, bone-headed invective and fictional recollections, I thought there should be a place where he could just ramble on without fear of criticism or rebuttal.

This is the place.

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=47022&p=315790#p315790

Mark, please spew forth. There you will be safe from reality.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 25th, 2015, 3:11 pm

Oh dear! Poor Robert is having a tantrum! It seems to be affecting his memory so I had better assure him that my recollections are not "ficticious".

There were actually witnesses to the meeting in the apartment who are still around. Not that it matters much of course. I do remember the phone call though. I seem to recall he was very enthusiastic about Doug Henning at the time saying "he must have done something right". Does he deny that he once had a student summer job working on the border? I do have a terribly fearsome memory of events of long ago, you know.

My mumblings are most certainly not irrelevant since they are all about the performance of magic which Mr Farmer perhaps has not had a lot of time to pursue since he is far too busy being a lawyer. Still, writing books about the subject may well be a suitable substitute for actually performing and a welcome distraction. Everyone is entitled to their little hobby after all.


Neither is my invective "bone headed". After all when you are in the presence of one of the world's greatest close up magicians (for laymen) you may as well pick up a bone of knowledge from him. I do hope that Mr Farmer will pay attention and further his knowledge in these matters. I far prefer the expression "bone knowledged" to bone headed.

As part of this knowledge may I recommend peppermint tea for him. It does relax and calm the nerves somewhat. I sense he needs it. He seems terribly stressed out.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 25th, 2015, 3:24 pm

Mark, I've just put some food in your bowl and there's water in the bowl right beside it.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Dustin Stinett » August 25th, 2015, 3:38 pm

Harry Lorayne wrote:Wow, just saw this thread, read it all. And here I always assumed I [had] SOMETHING to do with the 10-Card Poker Deal. Doubt it now. Although I've been told that I certainly popularized it when I published my routine back in the 1960s - I think. No big deal.

That is Harry's post to which "performer" is referencing. As anyone who can comprehend what they read, it has absolutely nothing to with Harry not knowing his material was in Bob's book. Harry was wondering why, up until that point in the thread, his name had not been mentioned. (The very next post is Bob's mea culpa.)

So "performer" either knew that or he didn't. Either way, his comments do not even reach up to the level of being wrong.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 25th, 2015, 3:54 pm

I am sorry, Dustin. I don't want to sound like a lawyer but you are quoting one post out of context. It is the ensuing comments that gave the wrong impression. However, I merely asked politely for clarification and was perfectly willing to accept Richard's explanation but I suddenly received from another source angry invective unbecoming of a Canadian. I expect Canadians to be suitably boring and any deviation from that I do find quite peculiar and rather startling.

I am afraid I am not quite used to that sort of thing.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 25th, 2015, 3:56 pm

Bob Farmer wrote:Mark, I've just put some food in your bowl and there's water in the bowl right beside it.


No. You have it instead. I think you have a greater need of it than I do. Put some peppermint tea in the water though.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Dustin Stinett » August 25th, 2015, 4:57 pm

performer wrote:Word for word? I assume he got permission? The only reason I say this is that it seems when I read the earlier part of this long thread Harry didn't seem to be aware that his material was in the book. Of course perhaps they came to some agreement over the matter later on.

Just expressing my initial surprise-no more than that. No doubt there will be suitable clarification from Mr Farmer. [DS: emphasis mine]

This is your context and I am not out of it. You either knew you were wrong or you didn't. Either way, your statement above is fallacious.

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » August 25th, 2015, 5:14 pm

Back to the subject at hand:

Thank you Bob Farmer. This is an amazing piece of work and a beautiful looking book in it's own right. A definite collectable. I am only halfway thru the book and can't put it down. A complete compendium written by a wizard who adds intelligent comment and humour to the subject. An amazing and highly readable history of the ten card deal that manages to be both practical and entertaining. I am loving this.
—Bob Snelgrove

“… when Ricky Jay played poker with Jimmy Kimmel on The Tonight Show and magicians asked, as they always do, ‘Where can I find that?’ The answer is, of course, in The Bammo Ten Card Deal Dossier.
“… Bob Farmer has collected the best of them, perhaps almost all of them, together in this volume. You are spoiled for choice in this 400-page encyclopedia, not only with variations of the Ten Card Deal but also other related gambling routines which follow the theme of a card game in which the spectator makes choices but the magician always wins. The real tragedy is that ultimately only one of these items will find its way into your repertoire. But finding that item in this incredible collection is going to be a hell of a lot of fun.”
—David Britland

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby performer » August 25th, 2015, 5:15 pm

Actually either way it is not terribly important. I am sure it is a good book if Harry endorsed it. Of course he may not have seen Richard's remark that there are better routines than his in the book!

Here is Harry performing it anyway. Alas in my search for it I saw beneath it in the You Tube listings another video of a horrible child exposing the entire secret. I don't like the way magic is going with this awful exposure. I'm glad I'll be dead soon. I expect my last sentence will prove that I and Mr Farmer have something in common.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPhspnS0h_U

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Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » September 20th, 2015, 9:45 am

Right now I’m working on my new book, The Bammo Flim-Flam CONglomeration. This will be a greatly expanded compilation of all of my Flim-Flam columns, along with a Scamdex to allow you to pick the perfect scam to use at the bar down the road from the auto plant.

Those of you who have The Bammo Ten Card Deal Dossier, will find many things of interest. One of them, I have included below in a shorter version for this post.

TEN CARD DEB-AC-LE

Based on IF THREE STRIKES, YOU’RE OUT created By Robin Dawes

THE GAME

You use a Ten Card deal set: AC, AD, AH, JD, JH, JC, 6S, 6D, 6H, 9H.

The Mark mixes the ten cards and deals them out into two face-down rows.

You explain that the Mark can turn the cards face up in any order he pleases:

1. If he turns up the black Ace, the AC, he loses.

2. If he turns up the red Aces, AD, AH (in any order) BEFORE he turns up the AC, he wins.

THE PITCH

You tell the Mark he has only 1 chance in 10 of hitting the AC and losing. He has a tremendous advantage, but even so, you’re willing to bet even money on the outcome (he bets a buck, if he wins, he gets his buck back, along with one of yours).

THE SCAM

In fact, the Mark is going to lose two-thirds of the time and this counterintuitive reality, combined with the even-money payoff, is going to mean big money for you. But how come the intuitive odds (that is, the ones that just feel so right) are so far from the true odds?

The answer lies, first, in psychological predispositions (no space to explain here—see the new book) and, second, in two elements of the game that, though they appear to be affective, are nothing more than misdirective.

WINDOW DRESSING

First, and most important: it doesn’t matter how many cards you use.

You can include the three Aces in ten or ten thousand cards, it doesn’t affect the odds at all. The extra cards have no effect other than to delay the discovery of the Aces. Look at the rules of the game again:

1. If the Mark turns up the AC, he loses.

2. If he turns up the red Aces, in any order, before he turns up the AC, he wins.

Consider a simpler version of this game using the Aces and a single court card.

If the single court card is the first card turned over, it has absolutely no effect on the outcome of the game: the Mark has neither won nor lost.

All the court card has done is delay the turnover of the next card. Only when an Ace is turned over does the game advance (or end).

Similarly, if the court card is the second card turned over, the game is not advanced nor ended and the odds remain the same. And this doesn’t change whether you have one court card or seven million (though more dummy cards means it takes longer to play the game).

The true game being played here is essentially this: you have three Aces, one black and two red. The Mark can mix the three cards up and arrange them in any order.

If the particular order shows an AC, before a red Ace, he loses.

If a red Ace (in any order) coms up before the AC, he wins.

Looked at this way, there are only six arrangements possible:

1st card turned over AD AD AH AH AC AC
2nd card turned over AH AC AD AC (AD) (AH)
3rd card turned over (AC) (AH) (AC) (AD) (AH) (AD)
Mark Wins or Loses: Win Lose Win Lose Lose Lose

The cards in brackets are not turned over because the Mark has already won or lost—but it is necessary in determining the true odds to include them in the calculation.

The other element of this game that seems to affect the odds, but doesn’t, is the Mark’s right to turn over the cards in any order. As cards are revealed this seems to influence the odds applicable to the rest of the game - but it doesn’t, it’s just so much irrelevant randomness.

ADDING THE BIG AND THE BIGGER LIE

An even sneakier way of stating the false odds is to say:

“On the first card, the odds are 9 to 1 that I won’t win. On the second card, they are 8 to 1 that I won’t win.”

Here you’re focusing on the first rule: if the Mark turns over the AC, he loses; and; ignoring the second rule, if he turns over two red Aces, before the AC, he wins.

Going for broke, you add the bigger lie:

“So, if you add all those together, the odds that I won’t win are pretty substantial—and a loss for me is a win for you.”

Adding the odds together like this is completely wrong, however, according to scientific research (see the new book, below), given a choice between adding the probability of events (which results in a higher probability) and multiplying the probability of events (which results in a lower probability), Marks, like rabbits, have a tendency to add rather than multiply.

Bob Farmer
Posts: 2110
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Short card above selection.

Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » September 26th, 2015, 10:44 am

I'll be at the H&R Magic Books booth at Geniicon signing books, even ones I haven't written.

User avatar
AJM
Posts: 1069
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby AJM » September 26th, 2015, 11:26 am

Great - look forward to seeing you.

I'll bring along my bound volume of 1996 National Geographic Magazines.

Perhaps you would do me the honour of inscribing this as follows: -

'To My Dear Andrew
You will always be in my heart
JK Rowling'

And maybe add a few kisses if it's not too much trouble.

Thanks!
Corner-boy Begrudger

Bob Farmer
Posts: 2110
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Short card above selection.

Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bob Farmer » September 26th, 2015, 5:57 pm

Andrew: I inscribe all my books that way so there's a raging sea of broken hearts with me as the only calm island of sanity.

Bill Mullins
Posts: 4498
Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Huntsville, AL

Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby Bill Mullins » September 26th, 2015, 6:07 pm

When he signed my book, he drew a big X and got me to write next to it "Bob Farmer his mark".

MagicbyAlfred
Posts: 639
Joined: June 7th, 2015, 12:48 pm
Favorite Magician: Bill Malone
Location: Santa Rosa, California

Re: Inventing The Ten Card Poker Deal

Postby MagicbyAlfred » September 26th, 2015, 7:50 pm

We spent a few quality hours together one evening recently, but the only signing that was done was by me -
on an IOU.

(using invisible ink)


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