Magic in BoingBoing

Discussions of new films, books, television shows, and media indirectly related to magic and magicians. For example, there may be a book on mnemonics or theatrical technique we should know or at least know about.
Brad Henderson
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Brad Henderson » December 4th, 2015, 9:34 am

Widdle, knowing how to demonstrate a single card trick does not make one a magician.

I know how to make a great Mac and cheese. That does not make me a chef.

When in college i was required to learn how to tap out a song on the piano, does that make me a pianist?

or do you think I should get business cards printed up?

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 4th, 2015, 9:39 am

Jonathan, are you really saying that a person who buys a copy of Card College is still a layman?

Brad Henderson wrote:Widdle, knowing how to demonstrate a single card trick does not make one a magician.


Yes, it does. Just not a professional magician.

Brad Henderson wrote:I know how to make a great Mac and cheese. That does not make me a chef.


Nope, it doesn't. Because a chef is paid for making food. But you can cook, and make food for people to enjoy.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Brad Henderson » December 4th, 2015, 9:48 am

actually I know at least two 'laymen' who bought card college.

I should have used the word 'cook' instead of chef. Does being able to make a single dish make one a 'cook'? Or better still, does heating up pilsbury cookie dough make one a baker?

Widdle, did you ignore the pianist example for a reason?

does being able to plunk out a tune on the piano make one a pianist?

Does finishing a paint by number kit make one a painter?

Does being able to tell a joke make one a comedian?



Do you really believe that being able to execute a single trick is only bar to claiming that one is a magician? What if the execution of the trick fools no one?

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 4th, 2015, 10:05 am

I know loads and loads of people who know only a single card trick. It is usually the 21 card trick or the four burglars. According to Widdle they are magicians. I will concede however that they are less agonising to watch that many people who specialise in card tricks. At least the agony is over and done with far more quickly.

I suppose if the specialists can claim to be magicians the people who do one card trick only and get the agony over quickly might as well claim to be magicians too. Widdle may have a point after all.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 4th, 2015, 10:42 am

I see you all want to try and paint me in corner with a strict definition of "magician."

So tell me, what is someone who knows one or two tricks, and performs them flawlessly, with their own style, over many years of unpaid appreciate impromptu performances? If not a "magician," than perhaps a "magic enthusiast?" Is this person less valuable to laypeople (in terms of seeing magic) than a magician who has a comprehensive general knowledge of the craft, but they rarely, if ever, see perform?

Brad Henderson wrote: What if the execution of the trick fools no one?


What if the execution of a trick from a "magician" fools no one?
Just because a person is an amateur (in the field of magic) doesn't mean they can't perform a trick as good or better than a pro. That's been an acknowledged given in this craft forever.

I'd rather have a thousand "magic enthusiasts" who can perform just one trick each, than one "magician" who can perform many.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 4th, 2015, 10:55 am

P.T.Widdle wrote:Jonathan, are you really saying that a person who buys a copy of Card College is still a layman?


Having all of our literature on hand - and even having read a great deal of our literature - and having much magic product and some awareness of our history might make one a serious fan of magic... though as with sports ... a pile of baseball cards does not make you a baseball player. A huge pile of baseball cards does not make you a great baseball player.

To presume your audience could not know of the "erdnase" text, and could not possibly have both that and card college on their phones or cloud storage is ... naive in a cute way. They may have all of star wars too. even the extended universe. Maybe even pre-crisis DC comics superman. Fans and trivia for lively discussion.

Do you imagine others are even less well informed than yourself?

Peek-a-boo. I see you. Do you see your presupposition about others?
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Brad Henderson
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Brad Henderson » December 4th, 2015, 11:11 am

the magician who cannot perform a trick deceptively is not a magician.

The person who does one or two tricks flawlessly is a person who knows one or two tricks.

Just as being able to play one simple song on the piano, even well, does NOT make one a pianist.

I can remove a splinter from my hand. That does not make me a surgeon, even if I have watched every episode of House.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 4th, 2015, 11:14 am

Jonathan, a person who has bought Card Collage is a magic enthusiast at the very least. They are interested in learning some magic. They will most likely perform some of the tricks in the book, perhaps becoming a magic hobbyist. In our craft, the potential is there for them to also become an expert at a card trick without being a professional magician. That seems to be somewhat unique to our craft. That's certainly not the way it is in Baseball.

Of course there are varying degrees of magical knowledge in audiences, and that's fine. But by far, the majority do not buy magic books, are aware of any of their titles, and have no interest in picking one up. That's not a naive estimation, that's a fact.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Brad Henderson » December 4th, 2015, 11:21 am

does anyone recall the joke mike close used to tell comparing the demographics of a magic lecture to that of a music lecture?

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 4th, 2015, 11:45 am

P.T.Widdle wrote:Jonathan, a person who has bought Card Collage is a magic enthusiast at the very least. They are interested in learning some magic...


Of course you can call yourself an enthusiast. And if you wish to wear your receipt for purchasing the books as a badge of fan-boy merit... fine too. That suggests possibilities for a comicon costume and expanding our genre of fan fiction.

Before we pin down the word magician let's look for context. There are people who play baseball. Some folks make a career of it. They get on teams etc. In general those guys are called baseball players. The guys who maintain the stands or sell hot dogs don't call themselves baseball players. Let's look closer to where we live. Does the theater manager call himself an actor? Does the lighting guy call himself a playwright? Sure they are in theater. Though they don't all say they are actors.

Those who enjoy watching and collecting and talking about a thing are called fans. If you like the term Magic Enthusiast - feel free to wear that badge which says ME and be proud of who you are.

And for public safety let's agree that fooling yourself does not make you a magician.

Magic, the product, exists in stories told by non-magicians. We're talking about a theatrical craft. The actor playing the part of ... drama takes direction, comedy is difficult and magic... has additional challenges.

******************

I'm not so sure there is an implied benediction from Vernon that comes with glancing at a copy of "erdnase". I doubt a practical education in how to make card tricks work for audiences really comes with that purchase of "card college". Does having the full set of Tarbell on the shelf really imbue the owner with expertise and deep knowledge of the craft? That would be wonderful and as a premise for stories it may be workable. Not sure it helps when doing tricks for others...at least as far as others are concerned.

one more item, a dust covered cobweb we may need to clear:
http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-st ... leths.html

The audience is not so ignorant as some here might believe. And they post online too. They know the meaning and history of "willing suspension of disbelief".
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 4th, 2015, 12:42 pm

Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Of course you can call yourself an enthusiast. And if you wish to wear your receipt for purchasing the books as a badge of fan-boy merit... fine too. That suggests possibilities for a comicon costume and expanding our genre of fan fiction.

Those who enjoy watching and collecting and talking about a thing are called fans. If you like the term Magic Enthusiast - feel free to wear that badge which says ME and be proud of who you are.

And for public safety let's agree that fooling yourself does not make you a magician.


Such condescending will not bring what you do as a magician any more respect.

A man who makes a coin disappear to a wide-eyed child is a magician (at least in their eyes, and at that moment). Do you need him to also be wearing a top hat? If you don't want to call him a magician, fine. But he performed magic. What else is there?

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby MagicbyAlfred » December 4th, 2015, 12:45 pm

This is a fascinating thread because it has gone so far beyond a debate over the pros and cons of exposure on a layman's blog. I would acknowledge that in pretty much all matters of opinion, everyone's opinion matters. And this a very lively and spirited debate indeed!

Kudos to JT for an awesome analogy: "To equate recognizing text as including rhetoric with having the ability to offer a persuasive argument would be absurd. Magic is to results as Rhetoric is to persuasion." It's interesting that most often the best arguments can be made in a sentence or two.

But essentially, aren't we playing a word game in arguing what is "magic" and who is really a "magician?" It's a semantical game, and a very subjective one at that. Nonetheless fascinating. If you wanted to get really technical about it, though, are any of us truly "magicians," whether a pro, an amateur or a one-trick pony? I think it can be said we are merely creating the "illusion" of magic or of being a magician. (Or in some cases, regrettably, the delusion). For classically, a magician is one with true magical or supernatural powers. So by that definition, nobody (at least with whom I am acquainted) can legitimately call him or herself a magician. No one on here has yet claimed those powers that I know of, although I suspect such a claim might just be forthcoming from Performer. As he would say, "I know these things."

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 4th, 2015, 1:26 pm

P.T.Widdle wrote:...A man who makes a coin disappear to a wide-eyed child is a magician [snip]. What else is there?


Another Seinfeld reference comes to mind.
Mundus vult decipi -per Caleb Carr's story Killing Time

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 4th, 2015, 1:38 pm

Old Murray of Blackpool would get on his high horse if you used the word "magician". He said you should use the word "conjurer". To Murray the word "magician" only applied if you did illusions or had a big show like he did back in the day. Thus Dante would be a magician and Paul Daniels would be a "conjurer". He often used to correct me when I used the term incorrectly as he saw it. Mind you, I think he was a magician the way he made my change disappear. You could forget trying to get change out of Murray. He would feign deafness with great skill.

Quite frankly there are very few magicians on this forum. Or in the community of magic generally. There are many "magic buffs" or "enthusiasts" but only a tiny few who can claim to be magicians. Magicians by definition are people who PERFORM magic on a FREQUENT basis, whether amateur or professional. Just creating material although a valuable contribution does not make you a magician. Writing books or articles on magic does not make you a magician. Pontificating or creating blogs on the internet about magic does not make you a magician. Being the President of a magic club does not make you a magician. Being a convention organiser does not make you a magician.

None of the above make you a magician. At best you are a magic buff or a contributor to the magical arts. But you are NOT a magician. You are merely a layman who happens to know how the tricks are done.

The only way you can claim to be a magician is to do magic on a frequent basis. If you do it badly then you are a bad magician but you are still a magician. If you do it well you are a good magician but still a magician.

Very few people are qualified to be termed magicians. I certainly am and a few others are. The rest of you? Sorry, the answer is no.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby mr_goat » December 4th, 2015, 2:12 pm

performer wrote:Magicians by definition are people who PERFORM magic on a FREQUENT basis,


Not according to any dictionary I can find.

Oxford:

Definition of magician in English:
noun

1A person with magical powers.

1.1A conjuror.

1.2 informal A person with exceptional skill in a particular area.

Webster

: a person who has the power to make impossible things happen

: a performer who does tricks that seem to be impossible

: a person who has amazing skills

So, as currently the world doesn't rely on the "Ronnie" Dictionary, I am afraid to inform you that you're mistaken.
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 4th, 2015, 2:26 pm

The lattice tower and suspension bridge bear superficial resemblance to cobwebs or decorative scroll-work. On paper their shapes might seem similarly ornate as if all were intended to catch the wandering eye. One is designed and built for purpose other than decoration. Literature is similar in that some shelf weights are designed to convey the how-to of craft.

Practical strategies of effective deception are not so easily set in context as scrollwork set over a plain design or cobwebs spun on neglected sheltered corner. The former must bear times test in application. The latter tangles the petty, attracts dust and announces a want of diligence.

This reader distinguishes the writer's craft as reflected in The Prestige's conceit and The Man in the High Castle's design as different from what's needed when performing magic for audiences.

*

Is there a floor wax with the word "magic" in the product name? Or a dessert topping? Just wondering.
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 4th, 2015, 3:05 pm

performer wrote:...
Very few people are qualified to be termed magicians. ...


And this community - as fans of magic (and some among us who both study and practice ) - may have missed out on noticing the update of The Wiz - encore Satuday 8pm on NBC. How so? Look how stories change over time and audiences. What works on stage and what strikes the imagination. It's the start of winter and a good time to think about what to plant for the next season. What does the audience imagine as magical and respond to the way we'd like to have them respond to shows in our craft?

Over on boingboing there's little about Santa and some about Krampus. Reaction to an early buying season? What means this auger?
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 4th, 2015, 3:27 pm

Thank you Jonathon for your responses. Once I get them back from the translator I am sure that I will be enthralled by them.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 8th, 2015, 3:00 pm

More "contamination" of magic? Or a nice starter package offered on a website whose editors know their audience - namely, magic enthusiasts.

http://boingboing.net/2015/12/08/learn- ... e-pen.html

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 8th, 2015, 3:36 pm

P.T.Widdle wrote:More "contamination" of magic? Or a nice starter package offered on a website whose editors know their audience - namely, magic enthusiasts.

http://boingboing.net/2015/12/08/learn- ... e-pen.html


I can answer that. Penguin will say it is a nice starter package and Brad will say it is a contamination of magic. Next question?

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 8th, 2015, 3:51 pm

from that ad: "get into magic tricks, and master the art in no time. "

it's that bit about mastering the art
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 8th, 2015, 3:54 pm

Jonathan Townsend wrote:from that ad: "get into magic tricks, and master the art in no time. "

it's that bit about mastering the art


Yeah, magic ads should be free of hyperbole, just like every other ad.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 8th, 2015, 3:58 pm

If it's something that has to be bought, then people are investing in learning the secrets. From this new magicians are made.
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 8th, 2015, 3:59 pm

P.T.Widdle wrote:
Jonathan Townsend wrote:from that ad: "get into magic tricks, and master the art in no time. "

it's that bit about mastering the art


Yeah, magic ads should be free of hyperbole, just like every other ad.


[insert medical/financial disclaimer text to let the reader know for the next half page warning about inflated egos that last longer than it takes to get to the dinner table can cause severe averse social reactions. If you experience effect related fantasy for longer than two minutes please contact a professional magician. Long term effect related disorders can include....]
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 8th, 2015, 4:04 pm

P.T.Widdle wrote:
Jonathan Townsend wrote:from that ad: "get into magic tricks, and master the art in no time. "

it's that bit about mastering the art


Yeah, magic ads should be free of hyperbole, just like every other ad.


Hardly. Not a very sensible way of making money I would have thought. I am a great believer in hyperbole. You should have seen some of my ads in Abra in the Seventies. A combination of downright lies, insults and humour with lots of hyperbole. I used to take in a lot of money from my ads despite me hearing Ken Brooke once state that you would be lucky to get one response a week from Abra. I got many.

No. Hyperbole is the name of the game if you want to make any money.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 8th, 2015, 4:07 pm

More Modern Hyperbole, the sequel to Mastering Matters with Words, will be released soon. Preorders being accepted for a limited edition...
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Brad Henderson » December 8th, 2015, 4:21 pm

think of all the tricks you have bought that sit in a drawer, that are absolute crap.

Just because someone reads a secret or even pays for it does not mean they will develop a love for magic.

in fact, if the odds of them buying a great trick are the same as ours, my prediction is their purchase will turn off more people to magic than attract them. (speaking generally, I don't know this particular product).

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby MagicbyAlfred » December 8th, 2015, 4:57 pm

Jonathan Townsend wrote:

"from that ad: 'get into magic tricks, and master the art in no time.' "

"it's that bit about mastering the art"

To which P.T. Widdle responded:

"Yeah, magic ads should be free of hyperbole, just like every other ad."

What is characterized as "hyperbole" by one individual, could be construed as false advertising by others. Mastery of the art of magic "in no time" through purchase of a starter magic kit is about as likely as mastery of the sport of tennis in no time through purchase of a racket and balls. And, I would add, that it is a classic trick of rhetoric and a logical fallacy to defend an indefensible position by pointing to others who have taken similarly indefensible positions.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby P.T.Widdle » December 8th, 2015, 8:39 pm

Brad Henderson wrote:my prediction is their purchase will turn off more people to magic than attract them.


You never know. As distasteful an idea it may seem to you, some BB readers are probably thinking of doing something fun (magic) for friends and family during the holidays, and will give this package a try.

Maybe it's a minority of the purchasers who actually practice and try one or two of the tricks out, and even fewer who succeed, but for those that do lay down the cash and blow a mind or two, I agree with Richard, that a new magician may very well be made (and horrors of horrors, the original intent for that person may have even been to impress the opposite sex!)

And to MagicbyAlfred, who seems so offended by the "false advertising" of the line, "master the art in no time!" I would caution you not to watch this ad by Marshal Brodien with his "false advertising" claim:

"Most magic tricks are easy once you know the secret."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uckMhd4yv0E

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jonathan Townsend » December 8th, 2015, 9:17 pm

Mundus vult decipi -per Caleb Carr's story Killing Time

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby MagicbyAlfred » December 8th, 2015, 9:29 pm

P.T. just to be clear, I was not "offended" in the least, nor am I personally accusing anyone of false advertising. Just pointing that some people might differ in their interpretation of claims made about a product, that's all.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 8th, 2015, 10:59 pm

The svengali deck does not count in the controversy as it no longer belongs to magicians who have no idea how to work it properly anyway.
We grafters stole it decades ago and possession is nine points of the law. Besides I am greatly disapproving of the way that Marshall Brodien does the "Run" move in that commercial. His thumb is in the wrong place and I do not approve. Darrell makes exactly the same mistake in his video of the deck. It proves my point about magicians having no idea how to work the deck properly.

I don't like exposure but there are certain tricks that are exempt from censure since they do turn people into magicians and more importantly line my pockets. What I object to is higher grade tricks that are exposed to the general public. I do NOT want more magicians to be hatched---I want less. Far, far less.

The tricks that should be exempt since they no longer belong to magicians anyway are the svengali deck, the mouse and worm, the small plastic cups and balls, and the Dutch Looper three card trick which has its roots as a fairground trick.

I do not approve of wonderful tricks like the sponge balls being sold to the public. I am still trying to get over the horror of greedy old Albert Goshman trying to persuade me to purchase sponges balls from him to pitch to the public. I couldn't believe such an eminent close up magician would advise on such a thing. And the sponge balls was even part of his repertoire.

I am very proud of the fact that when I have sold magic to the public there is zero chance of them ever being able to do it. Thus I protect the secrets of magic.

I still remember selling the wonder mouse at the Tralee Festival in Ireland and running out of instruction leaflets. A passing fellow scoundrel grafter advised me to double the price and sell them without instructions on the grounds that the punters at that time of night would be too drunk to notice the difference. I found that to be splendid advice even though I was a bit dubious at first.

I only had one complaint. Some burly drunken Irishman came up to me holding the poor rodent by it's tail snarling at me, "what the !@#$ is this? It doesn't !@#$%^& work!" I couldn't use my usual line of "Read the instructions" since there weren't any so I tried to explain, "It's the magic motor sir, you have to put the magic motor in", Of course the magic motor is merely the piece of wax that you attach the thread to. Joe Stuthard invented the idea of showing it openly saying it was a "magic motor" that made the mouse move. Alas the inebriated punter snarled at me "what the !@#$ do you mean a magic @#$%^^ motor" He then threw the mouse right in my face and stormed off. Naturally I put it back into stock and carried on. So the complaint actually turned into a profit since he never got a refund.

So at least with a pitchman nobody is actually going to use the tricks that are sold.That makes people like me terribly ethical. Alas Boing Boing is different and I consider that lamentable.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Brad Henderson » December 8th, 2015, 11:18 pm

PT, you misunderstand me. This has nothing to do with an idea being distasteful. It has to do with quality.

When I was a kid a pitchman was selling TV magic cards at the local five and dime. My parents bought me a set of the magic cards and the mystery cards.

I was so excited. I got home and ran to my room. I closed the door and carefully opened the instructions. I was breathless in anticipation of these cards coming to life when properly handled.

and then it all came crashing down. I had no idea what I had bought or how to do it. The instructions were indecipherable. I was crushed. It was now dinner time.

My mom's friend could tell I was upset. I explained I couldn't make the magic work and she offered to help.

of course I refused! How could I amaze her If she knew my secrets?

At that moment, I would like to say, I realized the importance of self reliance and decided to use my creativity to create my own applications of this new tool.

I'd like to say that.

Instead I just went into my room and cried.

When I finally went to a magic shop they asked me what type of magic I liked. I made it expressly clear that one of those types was NOT card tricks.

while I'm happy to report that has changed, the point remains - not all exposure, for a variety of reasons, will necessarily lead to a further interest in magic. Some may even turn people away.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 8th, 2015, 11:32 pm

Brad's tale fills me with great pleasure. I am sure this must have happened many, many times over the decades I have sold the svengali deck. It brings joy to my soul to think of all the thousands of disappointed children whose hearts I have broken by selling them something that doesn't work and at the same time having kept the secrets of magic intact. I think the Magic Castle should give me an award for services to the art of magic.

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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Richard Kaufman » December 9th, 2015, 12:13 am

Gee, Brad, I had exactly the opposite experience you did. I bought a Svengali Deck from Danny Tsukalis at Macy's and he took me to the side of the counter and showed me how to handle it. It was a revelation. That flower bloomed.
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Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Brad Henderson » December 9th, 2015, 1:04 am

which is exactly my point. the quality of the experience we have determines the likelihood of our future involvement - some experiences can do more damage than good.

I also remember the magic kit my mom bought at a garage sale. Same experience. it was more frustrating than positive.

not all exposure is good exposure

performer
Posts: 2134
Joined: August 7th, 2015, 10:35 pm

Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby performer » December 9th, 2015, 1:05 am

It all depends on the pitchman you get. I growl at the punters and scare them away so they don't dare ask me how it is done. You can't spend all day giving lessons. I usually snarl, "read the instructions" in my best customer service manner.

And a lot also depends on how busy the demonstrator is. If money is coming in hand over fist you just haven't got time to be explaining things. However, if business is quiet and you are of a generous disposition you can indeed explain how to do it. Providing it is the svengali deck of course. If you explain the worm or the mouse to them they will immediately want their money back and you will wish you hadn't said a word.

Having said all this I have despite myself actually started people on magic because they were silly enough to buy a svengali deck from me.

Jack Shalom
Posts: 405
Joined: February 7th, 2008, 12:00 pm
Location: Brooklyn NY

Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby Jack Shalom » December 9th, 2015, 1:37 am

Jonathan Townsend wrote:just encourages this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCVJRA8No_s

Who knew that there existed home movies of performer as a wee one!

MagicbyAlfred
Posts: 612
Joined: June 7th, 2015, 12:48 pm
Favorite Magician: Bill Malone
Location: Santa Rosa, California

Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby MagicbyAlfred » December 9th, 2015, 2:30 am

Performer wrote: "The svengali deck does not count in the controversy as it no longer belongs to magicians who have no idea how to work it properly anyway."

Even if I did know how to work it properly, I would never use it in actual performance. The minute a layman sees more than one of a particular card, it screams trick deck. Under no circumstances do I ever want the people who hire me or their guests to attribute any effect I do with cards to the cards being "trick cards." For a grafter pitching the deck, that is fine, in fact desirable, since it holds out the implied promise to the punter that he will be able to do tricks without possessing any skill, i.e., the deck will do it for him. So, in my view, for the very same reason that the svengali deck is a useful, profitable and desirable tool in the hands of a competent pitchman, it is equally undesirable for magicians. The grafters are welcome to it as far as I'm concerned.

mr_goat
Posts: 158
Joined: May 22nd, 2015, 11:04 am
Favorite Magician: Glenn Bishop

Re: Magic in BoingBoing

Postby mr_goat » December 9th, 2015, 6:09 am

MagicbyAlfred wrote:Even if I did know how to work it properly, I would never use it in actual performance. The minute a layman sees more than one of a particular card, it screams trick deck.


You can use it without showing the dupes.

Britland has a brilliant ACAAN using a reverse cut svengali that I fooled many people with at the Castle including Howard Hamburg.
Yes, it is mrgoat, I just can't log in with old account.


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