Magic Lot: Lubor Fiedler, Martin Lewis, Magiro, U.F. Grant, Conway

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reburbia
Posts: 52
Joined: May 24th, 2015, 7:12 pm

Magic Lot: Lubor Fiedler, Martin Lewis, Magiro, U.F. Grant, Conway

Postby reburbia » October 15th, 2017, 1:45 pm

$699 for entire lot shipped. For pictures, click http://www.ebay.com/itm/Magic-Lot-Lubor-Fiedler-Martin-Lewis-Magiro-U-F-Grant-Conway-rare-vintage/112603348239

1) Eric Lewis, "The Savoy": In the late 40s, Elliot & Lyons published a design in Phoenix magazine for a clever apparatus that could switch one metal locket for another, in plain sight of the audience. This design was inspired by an old English black art trick. In the late 70s, Eric Lewis designed two prototypes of this apparatus called "The Savoy," which fittingly was later produced in a limited run by Carl Williams and Eric's son Martin. This latter version was then copied (rather sloppily and without credit) by Mikame as "Heart of Gold." Eric's Savoy recently sold in auction for over $300. Scarce

2) Lubor Fiedler, "Color Cards": Lubor's magic is known for being offbeat and scientific; this effect is no exception. 5 cards with different colors are arranged by the spectator on a stand in any order. The spectator throws all cards into an opaque bag and shakes it. The audience is convinced there is no way for the magician to know the order. Yet the magician takes the opaque bag back, reaches inside, and pulls out the cards in the exact order chosen by the spectator. No electronics or stooges, a real magician fooler. A rare advertisement copy will be included that describes (but does not explain) an effect sold by Lubor at the time, in which a card visibly melts through a zip-lock bag full of water.

3) Lubor Fiedler, "Die-a-bolic": The magician pulls out an opaque film canister, and empty a die onto the table. Both the die and canister are thoroughly examined by the audience. A spectator secretly places the die on the table with any number on top, and covers it. The magician turns around and the spectator returns the die in a random orientation. The magician replaces the die in the canister and immediately divines the number. It is a brilliant foolproof fooler with no electronics, and every move is logical. The ungimmicked film canisters are not included but can be found online for a quarter.

4) Lubor Fiedler, "Spin gone": The magician riffles a small packet of holed cards and then shows a plastic disc with a hole in the middle. Strangely enough, the magician then balances both the cards and disc on his thumb. The disc is slowly rotated and then, like some Hollywood special effect, the cards vanish completely. The plastic disc is then removed from the magician's thumb, and the cards are found hidden behind, still balanced on the thumb! The plastic disc is not included but can be easily made, and even the cards can be replaced once you understand the design.

5) Lubor Fiedler, "50/50 chance": Lubor is responsible for some brilliant topological magic. The magician shows an envelope to the audience and then pierces it with a thread. A spectator is then ordered to immediately call out "Green" or "Orange." Despite a completely free choice, the magician then rips open the envelope and shows the thread has pierced the correct color. Everything can be examined. Ungimmicked envelopes and thread are not included but easily substituted.

6) Magiro & Eckhard Bottcher, "Pythagorus": The spectator fully examines three wooden blocks and a black stand, and then secretly arranges the blocks with any three consecutive digit. The magician is standing behind the stand with absolutely no way to see the numbers. The spectator can even come to the magician's angle and verify there is absolutely no way to see. Yet the magician divines the number immediately, using a clever system that will make you smile. No electronics, rare.

7) Magiro, "Where is the Red Chip?": The spectator secretly stacks three poker chips in any order and places a wooden cover on top. The magician touches the cover with a wooden wand and immediately divines the order. Everything is then examined. No peeking, electronics, or ditching. Clever

8) Magiro, Psychic Wand: Four white clips with different colored ribbons are examined by the spectator. These clips are then placed onto a wooden stick, which is held at the very tip of the ends by the magician. The spectator names any of the four colors, and instantly that freely selected ribbon shoots off the stick into the air. Beautiful effect with a slick mechanism

9) Magiro, Miracle Coin Tray: A spectator secretly places a coin in one of four locations on a thin wooden board. All locations are then covered with an opaque wooden lid. The performer turns around and immediately divines the locations. Requires good eyesight. Diabolical tray gaffed in a way you are not expecting.

10) Magiro, Vanishing Card: A card and envelope is pinned to a black and yellow stand. The card slowly lowers and then vanishes completely to be found inside the sealed envelope. Very unusual method and effect.

11) Magiro, "Light/Heavy Box": Spectator can only pick up a box after the magician removes a toothpick inside. No electronics to worry about failing. Each wall is 8 inches long and a half inch thick. The die beautifully painted on all sides. The built-in lid is not easy to open unless you know the secret. Therefore you can temporarily leave it in the spectator's hand without worrying that they will easily look inside.

12) Eberhard Niedrig, Zauber Butike, "Wonder of the Jakamimes": The aboriginal shamans of Brazil would often use Jakamimes, a rare ant species, to predict in which direction a flood would come. The spectator points the ant to a particular direction on the map and covers it with dome. Upon turning around, the magician grabs his wand and immediately announces the direction. The wand, dome, ant, and map are all completely examinable. Unusual props and beautiful routine.

13) Syd Bergson, "Perplexia": Syd Bergson was an IBM president and expert mentalist. His effects and methods were original and shrewd. He had a regular column in the Linking Ring called "Merely Mental" that I loved to read. His competition acts were unbelievably detailed, so many moving parts behind the scenes even though the effect appeared simple. In Perplexia, three spectators simultaneously stare at an object, but each one sees a different color.

14) Syd Bergson, "Cosmo Mind Control": Clever method for forcing a spectator to choose any color on a wooden board.

15) Syd Bergson, "Perfecta Clip Board": Truly original method for diving what a spectator wrote. Everything is examinable. Includes two boards

16) Syd Bergson, "Maximental": Gimmick and technique that allows for clean and bold predictions.

17) Pat Conway, Sym Pat Rise: No one has been more ingenious with a matchbox than Pat Conway. This is a brilliantly designed self-contained self rising matchbox.

18) Louis Gaynor, Ultissimo: The wooden stand needed to perform Ultissimo, in which a magician predicts two cards selected by the spectator. You will still need to buy two decks of cards, but the entire handling will be clearly explained.

19) Blackstone Potter & Potter Catalog, October 2017
"The moment someone with imagination and vision takes an effect... Everybody jumps up & says.. 'I can use that!'... Develop a little pride along with your magical ability." -Anneman

reburbia
Posts: 52
Joined: May 24th, 2015, 7:12 pm

Re: Magic Lot: Lubor Fiedler, Martin Lewis, Magiro, U.F. Grant, Conway

Postby reburbia » October 15th, 2017, 11:16 pm

The items in the lot have changed. Everything shipped for $499

1) Eric Lewis, "The Savoy": In the late 40s, Elliot & Lyons published a design in Phoenix magazine for a clever apparatus that could switch one metal locket for another, in plain sight of the audience. This design was inspired by an old English black art trick. In the late 70s, Eric Lewis designed two prototypes of this apparatus called "The Savoy," which fittingly was later produced in a limited run by Carl Williams and Eric's son Martin. This latter version was then copied (rather sloppily and without credit) by Mikame as "Heart of Gold." Eric's Savoy recently sold in auction for over $300. Scarce

2) Lubor Fiedler, "Color Cards": Lubor's magic is known for being offbeat and scientific; this effect is no exception. 5 cards with different colors are arranged by the spectator on a stand in any order. The spectator throws all cards into an opaque bag and shakes it. The audience is convinced there is no way for the magician to know the order. Yet the magician takes the opaque bag back, reaches inside, and pulls out the cards in the exact order chosen by the spectator. No electronics or stooges, a real magician fooler. A rare advertisement copy will be included that describes (but does not explain) an effect sold by Lubor at the time, in which a card visibly melts through a zip-lock bag full of water.

3) Lubor Fiedler, "Die-a-bolic": The magician pulls out an opaque film canister, and empty a die onto the table. Both the die and canister are thoroughly examined by the audience. A spectator secretly places the die on the table with any number on top, and covers it. The magician turns around and the spectator returns the die in a random orientation. The magician replaces the die in the canister and immediately divines the number. It is a brilliant foolproof fooler with no electronics, and every move is logical. The ungimmicked film canisters are not included but can be found online for a quarter.

4) Lubor Fiedler, "Spin gone": The magician riffles a small packet of holed cards and then shows a plastic disc with a hole in the middle. Strangely enough, the magician then balances both the cards and disc on his thumb. The disc is slowly rotated and then, like some Hollywood special effect, the cards vanish completely. The plastic disc is then removed from the magician's thumb, and the cards are found hidden behind, still balanced on the thumb! The plastic disc is not included but can be easily made, and even the cards can be replaced once you understand the design.

5) Lubor Fiedler, "50/50 chance": Lubor is responsible for some brilliant topological magic. The magician shows an envelope to the audience and then pierces it with a thread. A spectator is then ordered to immediately call out "Green" or "Orange." Despite a completely free choice, the magician then rips open the envelope and shows the thread has pierced the correct color. Everything can be examined. Ungimmicked envelopes and thread are not included but easily substituted.

6) Magiro, "Where is the Red Chip?": The spectator secretly stacks three poker chips in any order and places a wooden cover on top. The magician touches the cover with a wooden wand and immediately divines the order. Everything is then examined. No peeking, electronics, or ditching. Clever

7) Eberhard Niedrig, Zauber Butike, "Wonder of the Jakamimes": The aboriginal shamans of Brazil would often use Jakamimes, a rare ant species, to predict in which direction a flood would come. The spectator points the ant to a particular direction on the map and covers it with dome. Upon turning around, the magician grabs his wand and immediately announces the direction. The wand, dome, ant, and map are all completely examinable. Unusual props and beautiful routine.

8) Syd Bergson, "Perplexia": Syd Bergson was an IBM president and expert mentalist. His effects and methods were original and shrewd. He had a regular column in the Linking Ring called "Merely Mental" that I loved to read. His competition acts were unbelievably detailed, so many moving parts behind the scenes even though the effect appeared simple. In Perplexia, three spectators simultaneously stare at an object, but each one sees a different color.

9) Syd Bergson, "Cosmo Mind Control": Clever method for forcing a spectator to choose any color on a wooden board.

10) Syd Bergson, "Perfecta Clip Board": Truly original method for diving what a spectator wrote. Everything is examinable. Includes two boards

11) Syd Bergson, "Maximental": Gimmick and technique that allows for clean and bold predictions.

12) Conway, Sym Pat Rise: No one has been more ingenious with a matchbox than Pat Conway. This is a brilliantly designed self-contained self rising matchbox.

13) Louis Gaynor, Ultissimo: The wooden stand needed to perform Ultissimo, in which a magician predicts two cards selected by the spectator. You will still need to buy two decks of cards, but the entire handling will be clearly explained.

14) Blackstone Potter & Potter Catalog, October 2017

15) Clarence Miller, Impossible Penetration: Not the cheaply made Viking copy. This is engraved and signed Clarence Miller 1985, in beautiful dark walnut unlike his later lighter wood versions.
"The moment someone with imagination and vision takes an effect... Everybody jumps up & says.. 'I can use that!'... Develop a little pride along with your magical ability." -Anneman


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